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The Expats Will Rule Singapore!

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EADG
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Postby EADG » Sun, 18 Apr 2010 4:24 pm

I concur with both. And companies who are relocating people here from other countries thinking it's cheaper here have still yet to pick up on the seond point in terms of the effect on employees. The relative weakness of the local currency is just another factor.

It is not a cheap place to live - there may be more expensive places, but it's not cheap here anymore.

JR8 wrote:I don't think it difficult to rent here, but I don't consider it cheap...
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Postby JR8 » Sun, 18 Apr 2010 4:59 pm

I could probably rent a place in Notting Hill London more cheaply, than I could in Toa Payoh D.12


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Postby anneteoh » Sun, 18 Apr 2010 6:17 pm

EADG wrote:I concur with both. And companies who are relocating people here from other countries thinking it's cheaper here have still yet to pick up on the seond point in terms of the effect on employees. The relative weakness of the local currency is just another factor.

It is not a cheap place to live - there may be more expensive places, but it's not cheap here anymore.

JR8 wrote:I don't think it difficult to rent here, but I don't consider it cheap...


--- Surely, the Sing$ is now much stronger than the pound ( sorry, no symbols on my laptop ). If I had continued to work there ....sigh, I'd be rolling in it. I guess working for the Singaporean Govt. might be different.
Still, the cost of living goes with one of the most convenient places to live in. I'm going over just to live and get on with my own work. Imagine, one needs never have to cook, yet one's spoilt for choice.

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Postby JR8 » Sun, 18 Apr 2010 6:36 pm

anneteoh wrote:
EADG wrote:I concur with both. And companies who are relocating people here from other countries thinking it's cheaper here have still yet to pick up on the seond point in terms of the effect on employees. The relative weakness of the local currency is just another factor.

It is not a cheap place to live - there may be more expensive places, but it's not cheap here anymore.

JR8 wrote:I don't think it difficult to rent here, but I don't consider it cheap...


--- Surely, the Sing$ is now much stronger than the pound ( sorry, no symbols on my laptop ). If I had continued to work there ....sigh, I'd be rolling in it. I guess working for the Singaporean Govt. might be different.
Still, the cost of living goes with one of the most convenient places to live in. I'm going over just to live and get on with my own work. Imagine, one needs never have to cook, yet one's spoilt for choice.



Yes the S$ is up say 30% on the £. That's the problem, I get paid in £'s :cry:

anneteoh

Postby anneteoh » Sun, 18 Apr 2010 6:57 pm

JR8 wrote:Yes the S$ is up say 30% on the £. That's the problem, I get paid in £'s :cry:


--- Don't despair while you're still there! Some suggestions: -
1. ask to be paid in Sing$ or ask for your salary to be tied to the current rates of exchange with the local currency. This is only reasonable.
--- Otherwise, find ways to make up for the loss - live more cheaply, start up a business as a side line, do a few more hours odd jobs etc.
I'm saying this as you really can do a lot out there; e.g. tax is only 1% or so etc.
Chin up.

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Postby JR8 » Sun, 18 Apr 2010 7:13 pm

1) I'm self-employed with a UK income. I can ask as much as I like, won't change that though :)


I could start (another) business, but the problem is I'm bloody lazy. So in many respects I'd rather sit back and whine, than go and better my lot (not that I have a bad lot at all in the first place).

It was more an observation on how prices have 'gone up' 30% over the past two years. I came here from NYC... and things felt cheaper here than there. Now they don't...


p.s. Appreciate your kind thoughts though Anneteoh thx...

anneteoh

If it helps...

Postby anneteoh » Sun, 18 Apr 2010 7:31 pm

JR8 wrote:1) I'm self-employed with a UK income. I can ask as much as I like, won't change that though :)


I could start (another) business, but the problem is I'm bloody lazy. So in many respects I'd rather sit back and whine, than go and better my lot (not that I have a bad lot at all in the first place).

It was more an observation on how prices have 'gone up' 30% over the past two years. I came here from NYC... and things felt cheaper here than there. Now they don't...


p.s. Appreciate your kind thoughts though Anneteoh thx...


--- I was very much for the spirit of the 60s, East or West!
Now, if it helps. Prices here in the UK , and France (I'd just returned) have more than doubled in the last year or so, for most things.
I''m not suggesting you fly back to NYC to check out the prices. lol
Have you heard about the book - How to Keep Happy by Mona Lot?
It's a good tonic.

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Postby JR8 » Sun, 18 Apr 2010 7:39 pm

Good title... :D

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Re: The Expats Will Rule Singapore!

Postby geerang » Thu, 13 May 2010 9:31 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:I received the following email from my boss this afternoon. Thought it would make interesting reading (My boss is a Singaporean). Kind of mirrors some of my thoughts that I've made here off and on over the years......

Makes for an interesting read. I normally don't like to cut & past but I've done so on this article from the email but I've also included a link to Adam's site for reference as well hence the difference of dates. Adam is a Singapore trainer of some repute here and in the region.

The Expats Will Rule Singapore

Adam Khoo: The expats will rule Singapore
Posted 28 January, 2010

I have a prediction. My prediction is that in a couple of years, the expatriates (from China, India, US etc…) will rule Singapore. They will increasing take on more leadership roles of CEOs, directors, heads of organizations, award winners etc… If you observe closely, it is already happening now. This year’s top PSLE (Primary School Leaving Exam) student is a China National. Most of the deans list students and first class honours students in the local universities are foreigners and more and more CEOs, even that of government link corporations are expats. The top players in our National teams are expats.

As a Singaporean, I am not complaining. I think that in a meritocratic society like Singapore, it is only fair that the very best get rewarded, no matter their race, religion or nationality. Like Lee Kwan Yew said, I rather these talented and driven people be on our team contributing to our nation than against us from their home country. The question I have been asking is, ‘why are the expats beating the crap out of Singaporeans?’ What I noticed is that these expats have a very important quality that many Singaporeans (especially the new Y generation lack). It is a quality that our grandfathers and great-grandfathers (who came from distant lands) had that turned Singapore from a fishing village to the third richest country in the world (according to GDP per capita). Unfortunately, I fear this quality is soon disappearing from the new generation of Singaporeans. This quality is the HUNGER FOR SUCCESS and the FIGHTING SPIRIT!!!

Expats who come here today have the same tremendous HUNGER for success that our grandfathers had. They are willing to sacrifice, work hard and pay the price to succeed. They also believe that no one owes them a living and they have to work hard for themselves. They also bring with them the humility and willingness to learn. Take the case of Qui Biqing, the girl from Qifa Primary school who topped the whole of Singapore in last year’s PSLE with a score of 290. When she came to Singapore 3 years ago from China, she could hardly speak a word of English and didn’t even understand what a thermometer was. Although she was 10 years old, MOE recommended she start at Primary 2 because of her lack of English proficiency. After appealing, she managed to start in Primary 3. While most Singaporeans have a head start of learning English at pre-school at the age of 3-4 years old, she only started at age 10. Despite this handicapped, she had the drive to read continuously and practice her speaking and writing skills, eventually scoring an A-star in English!

This hunger and drive can also be seen in the workforce. I hate to say this but in a way, I sometimes think expats create more value than locals. Expats are willing to work long hours, go the extra mile, are fiercely loyal to you and don’t complain so much. They also come alot more qualified and do not ask the moon for the remuneration. Recently, I placed an ad for a marketing executive. Out of 100+ resumes, more than 60% came from expats. While locals fresh grads are asking for $2,500+ per month, I have expats with masters degrees from good universities willing to get less than $2,000! They know that if they can come in and learn and work hard, they will eventually climb up and earn alot more. They are willing to invest in themselves, pay the price for future rewards. Sometimes I wonder how some of the locals are going to compete with this. Of course, this is just a generalization. There ARE definitely some Singaporeans who create lots of value and show fighting spirit.

Unfortunately, I have found that more and more young Singaporeans lack this hunger for success. Instead, they like to complain, blame circumstances and wait for others to push them. Some hold on to the attitude that the world owes them a living. I shake my head when I see local kids nowadays complain that they don’t have the latest handphones, branded clothes and games. While I acknowledge that the kids of today are much smarter and well informed than I was at their age (my 4 year old daughter can use my Macbook computer and my iphone), I find that they lack the resilience and tenacity they need to survive in the new economy. Some kids nowadays tend to give up easily once they find that things get tough and demand instant gratification. When they have to work first to get rewards later, many tend to lack the patience to follow through.

So, how did this happen? Why is our nation of hardworking, hungry fighters slowly becoming a nation of complaining softies? I think the problem is that life in Singapore has been too good and comfortable. Kids today have never seen hunger, poverty, war and disasters. What makes it worse is that parents nowadays give kids everything they want and over protect them from hardship and failure. Parents often ask me why their kids lack the motivation to study and excel. My answer to them is because they already have everything! Giving someone everything they want is the best way to kill their motivation. What reason is there for them to fight to become the best when they are already given the best from their parents without having to earn it? It reminds me of the cartoon movie MADAGASCAR where Alex the Lion and his animal friends were born and raised in the Central Park Zoo. They were well taken care of and provided with processed food and an artificial jungle. When they escaped to Africa, they found that they could barely survive in the wild with the other animals because they had lots their instincts to fight and hunt for food. They could only dance and sing.

I see the same thing in the hundreds of seminars and training programmes I conduct. I see increasing more and more expats attending my Wealth Academy and Patterns of Excellence programme in Singapore. Not surprisingly, they are always the first to grab the microphone to answer and ask questions. While many of the locals come in late and sit at the back. The expats (especially those from India and China) always sit at the front, take notes ferociously and stay back way after the programme is over to ask questions. I feel ashamed sometimes when I ask for volunteers to ask questions, and the Singaporeans keep quiet, while the foreigners fight for the opportunity. For my “I Am Gifted!’ programme for students, I have the privileged to travel and conduct it in seven countries (Singapore, Indonesia, Hong Kong, China, Malaysia etc…) and see all students from all over. Is there a big difference in their attitude and behaviour? You bet!

Again, I feel really sad that in Singapore, most students who come are usually forced by their parents to come and improve themselves, Some parents even bribe them with computer games and new handphones to attend. During the course, some adopt the ‘I know everything’ attitude and lack the interest to succeed until I kick their butts. It is so different when I go to Malaysia, Indonesia and once in India. The kids there ask their parents to send them to my programme. They clap and cheer enthusiastically when the teachers enter the room and participate so willingly when lessons are on. I still scratch my head and wonder what happened to my fellow Singaporeans to this day.

So mark my words, unless the new generation of Singaporeans wake up and get out of their happy over protected bubble and start fighting for their future, the expats (like our great grandfathers) will soon be the rulers of the country. At the rate at which talented and hungry expats are climbing up , our future prime minister may be an Indian or China PR or may even an Ang Moh!


Singaporeans lack the hunger for success? I wonder who coined the term Kiasu and Kiasi then? We already had a jewish guy as "Prime Minister", his name is David Marshall. And another English guy as President, his name is Benjamin Sheares. There are a few Singaporeans of European ancestry in Parliament right now as well. Singapore has always been an immigrant society.
Sgporean in France for one year master degree. Back to Spore by 2011!

anneteoh

Re: The Expats Will Rule Singapore!

Postby anneteoh » Thu, 13 May 2010 9:59 pm

geerang wrote:
sundaymorningstaple wrote:I received the following email from my boss this afternoon. Thought it would make interesting reading (My boss is a Singaporean). Kind of mirrors some of my thoughts that I've made here off and on over the years......

Makes for an interesting read. I normally don't like to cut & past but I've done so on this article from the email but I've also included a link to Adam's site for reference as well hence the difference of dates. Adam is a Singapore trainer of some repute here and in the region.

The Expats Will Rule Singapore

Adam Khoo: The expats will rule Singapore
Posted 28 January, 2010

I have a prediction. My prediction is that in a couple of years, the expatriates (from China, India, US etc…) will rule Singapore. They will increasing take on more leadership roles of CEOs, directors, heads of organizations, award winners etc… If you observe closely, it is already happening now. This year’s top PSLE (Primary School Leaving Exam) student is a China National. Most of the deans list students and first class honours students in the local universities are foreigners and more and more CEOs, even that of government link corporations are expats. The top players in our National teams are expats.

As a Singaporean, I am not complaining. I think that in a meritocratic society like Singapore, it is only fair that the very best get rewarded, no matter their race, religion or nationality. Like Lee Kwan Yew said, I rather these talented and driven people be on our team contributing to our nation than against us from their home country. The question I have been asking is, ‘why are the expats beating the crap out of Singaporeans?’ What I noticed is that these expats have a very important quality that many Singaporeans (especially the new Y generation lack). It is a quality that our grandfathers and great-grandfathers (who came from distant lands) had that turned Singapore from a fishing village to the third richest country in the world (according to GDP per capita). Unfortunately, I fear this quality is soon disappearing from the new generation of Singaporeans. This quality is the HUNGER FOR SUCCESS and the FIGHTING SPIRIT!!!

Expats who come here today have the same tremendous HUNGER for success that our grandfathers had. They are willing to sacrifice, work hard and pay the price to succeed. They also believe that no one owes them a living and they have to work hard for themselves. They also bring with them the humility and willingness to learn. Take the case of Qui Biqing, the girl from Qifa Primary school who topped the whole of Singapore in last year’s PSLE with a score of 290. When she came to Singapore 3 years ago from China, she could hardly speak a word of English and didn’t even understand what a thermometer was. Although she was 10 years old, MOE recommended she start at Primary 2 because of her lack of English proficiency. After appealing, she managed to start in Primary 3. While most Singaporeans have a head start of learning English at pre-school at the age of 3-4 years old, she only started at age 10. Despite this handicapped, she had the drive to read continuously and practice her speaking and writing skills, eventually scoring an A-star in English!

This hunger and drive can also be seen in the workforce. I hate to say this but in a way, I sometimes think expats create more value than locals. Expats are willing to work long hours, go the extra mile, are fiercely loyal to you and don’t complain so much. They also come alot more qualified and do not ask the moon for the remuneration. Recently, I placed an ad for a marketing executive. Out of 100+ resumes, more than 60% came from expats. While locals fresh grads are asking for $2,500+ per month, I have expats with masters degrees from good universities willing to get less than $2,000! They know that if they can come in and learn and work hard, they will eventually climb up and earn alot more. They are willing to invest in themselves, pay the price for future rewards. Sometimes I wonder how some of the locals are going to compete with this. Of course, this is just a generalization. There ARE definitely some Singaporeans who create lots of value and show fighting spirit.

Unfortunately, I have found that more and more young Singaporeans lack this hunger for success. Instead, they like to complain, blame circumstances and wait for others to push them. Some hold on to the attitude that the world owes them a living. I shake my head when I see local kids nowadays complain that they don’t have the latest handphones, branded clothes and games. While I acknowledge that the kids of today are much smarter and well informed than I was at their age (my 4 year old daughter can use my Macbook computer and my iphone), I find that they lack the resilience and tenacity they need to survive in the new economy. Some kids nowadays tend to give up easily once they find that things get tough and demand instant gratification. When they have to work first to get rewards later, many tend to lack the patience to follow through.

So, how did this happen? Why is our nation of hardworking, hungry fighters slowly becoming a nation of complaining softies? I think the problem is that life in Singapore has been too good and comfortable. Kids today have never seen hunger, poverty, war and disasters. What makes it worse is that parents nowadays give kids everything they want and over protect them from hardship and failure. Parents often ask me why their kids lack the motivation to study and excel. My answer to them is because they already have everything! Giving someone everything they want is the best way to kill their motivation. What reason is there for them to fight to become the best when they are already given the best from their parents without having to earn it? It reminds me of the cartoon movie MADAGASCAR where Alex the Lion and his animal friends were born and raised in the Central Park Zoo. They were well taken care of and provided with processed food and an artificial jungle. When they escaped to Africa, they found that they could barely survive in the wild with the other animals because they had lots their instincts to fight and hunt for food. They could only dance and sing.

I see the same thing in the hundreds of seminars and training programmes I conduct. I see increasing more and more expats attending my Wealth Academy and Patterns of Excellence programme in Singapore. Not surprisingly, they are always the first to grab the microphone to answer and ask questions. While many of the locals come in late and sit at the back. The expats (especially those from India and China) always sit at the front, take notes ferociously and stay back way after the programme is over to ask questions. I feel ashamed sometimes when I ask for volunteers to ask questions, and the Singaporeans keep quiet, while the foreigners fight for the opportunity. For my “I Am Gifted!’ programme for students, I have the privileged to travel and conduct it in seven countries (Singapore, Indonesia, Hong Kong, China, Malaysia etc…) and see all students from all over. Is there a big difference in their attitude and behaviour? You bet!

Again, I feel really sad that in Singapore, most students who come are usually forced by their parents to come and improve themselves, Some parents even bribe them with computer games and new handphones to attend. During the course, some adopt the ‘I know everything’ attitude and lack the interest to succeed until I kick their butts. It is so different when I go to Malaysia, Indonesia and once in India. The kids there ask their parents to send them to my programme. They clap and cheer enthusiastically when the teachers enter the room and participate so willingly when lessons are on. I still scratch my head and wonder what happened to my fellow Singaporeans to this day.

So mark my words, unless the new generation of Singaporeans wake up and get out of their happy over protected bubble and start fighting for their future, the expats (like our great grandfathers) will soon be the rulers of the country. At the rate at which talented and hungry expats are climbing up , our future prime minister may be an Indian or China PR or may even an Ang Moh!


Singaporeans lack the hunger for success? I wonder who coined the term Kiasu and Kiasi then? We already had a jewish guy as "Prime Minister", his name is David Marshall. And another English guy as President, his name is Benjamin Sheares. There are a few Singaporeans of European ancestry in Parliament right now as well. Singapore has always been an immigrant society.


That's during the Colonial days, but it makes Singapore swing, though I wonder if the locals wouldn't feel threatened by this dominating species as described here. Rest assured, I beliee Singapore has enough taelnst to share with Britain. Anyway, the future rulers will most probably be a multiracial specie like Anglo-Chinese, or Sino Russ, SinOz, OzInd, SinoMelayu, Eurasian etc. I don't thin the future will be ruled by one dominant race, and I hope not for that matter.
Can't you wait to get back? Where are you in France and how do you find it?

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Re: The Expats Will Rule Singapore!

Postby geerang » Fri, 14 May 2010 1:31 am

anneteoh wrote:That's during the Colonial days


You are totally wrong. During David Marshall's time, Singapore was already a self governing territory. Benajamin Sheare's presidency was during the late 70s, of course SG was already a republic then.

An expat cannot rule Singapore because he has to be Singaporean to run for government. There have also been many Indian and Malay presidents. Devan nair, current president SR Nathan, etc all come to mind. I am all for meritocracy. I think the French are trying to adopt meritocracy right now.
Last edited by geerang on Fri, 14 May 2010 4:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby geerang » Fri, 14 May 2010 4:06 am

Come to think of it, loads of Chinese Singaporeans are probably not 100% pure Chinese ancestry. 70% of Singaporeans are classified as Chinese as the govt did not allow double barrel race classification, ie chinese-spanish, till recently but I think a good 30-50% of them are not really 100% pure Chinese.

A large group of Chinese came to Malaya before the British did in 1819 and more came during the British era. Most of these people were men who left China alone and they married the local Malays and Europeans (lack of Chinese women).

Lee Kuan Yew is perankan, I think he has Malay lineage from his grandmother's side. So Lee Hsien Loong would have some Malay blood in him as well. Many "Chinese" like Andrea De Cruz, Jean Danker etc are actually are mixed lineage.

Looking at the Singapore parliament right now, Arther Fong, Micheal Palmer, Christopher De Souza etc have European ancestry. I think Tharman married a Japanese lady and Pauline Straughan married an American? Don't know of what ancestry though, maybe German American or something. Vivian Balakrishan is of Chinese Indian mix.

Singapore is an immigrant society and it is very multicultural and that is great.
Sgporean in France for one year master degree. Back to Spore by 2011!


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