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Things I don't like about Singapore

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hey_smile
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Postby hey_smile » Wed, 08 Sep 2010 8:34 pm

What? No skin? That's where the taste lies... and white rice??? It's supposed to be rice cooked with chicken fat......:P Nope, you were duped big time... it aint chicken rice... just one of those fake ones you get from the stalls that sells all sorts of meat... Eat the "Hainanese" chicken rice.. not that you'll love it either :P


poodlek wrote:
x9200 wrote:Why do you....hate!? :)... chicken rice? It is not a dish of the kings and queens but is reasonably edible. Not that I would eat it having a bit broader choice.


To be fair, I only ate it once. And part of my problem with it was my expectation that it would be hot, juicy rotisserie chicken with a tasty sauce like at Swiss Chalet back home. What I got was cold, rubbery pieces of chicken, no skin, in a sugary, oily but very bland sauce and some plain white rice. To me, it was disgusting. With all the choices here, I'm sure I won't be tempted to give it a second go.

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Postby poodlek » Wed, 08 Sep 2010 9:42 pm

hey_smile wrote:What? No skin? That's where the taste lies... and white rice??? It's supposed to be rice cooked with chicken fat......:P Nope, you were duped big time... it aint chicken rice... just one of those fake ones you get from the stalls that sells all sorts of meat... Eat the "Hainanese" chicken rice.. not that you'll love it either :P


poodlek wrote:
x9200 wrote:Why do you....hate!? :)... chicken rice? It is not a dish of the kings and queens but is reasonably edible. Not that I would eat it having a bit broader choice.


To be fair, I only ate it once. And part of my problem with it was my expectation that it would be hot, juicy rotisserie chicken with a tasty sauce like at Swiss Chalet back home. What I got was cold, rubbery pieces of chicken, no skin, in a sugary, oily but very bland sauce and some plain white rice. To me, it was disgusting. With all the choices here, I'm sure I won't be tempted to give it a second go.


It was at the Chicken Rice Shop :-|

If somebody offers me some they consider to be good/authentic, then maybe I'll try it, but I'll never again spend money on it.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 08 Sep 2010 11:21 pm

Actually, before I lost all the weight 2.5 years ago, I had Chicken Rice quite often. I actually think it's quite nice. Especially if the uncle offers you some black duck sauce as well. That along with extra chili sauce and kopi susu or chinese tea used to work well for me for lunch.

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Postby QRM » Thu, 09 Sep 2010 8:32 am

The two "famous" chicken rice joints Boon tong kee, and the meritus mandarin Chatter box restaurant, people fly in from around the world and head straight there for the chicken rice fix. Mandarin claims it was German chef that created their now famous chicken rice set in the 70s.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 09 Sep 2010 9:14 am

I've had their Chicken Rice many times back in the '80's. My wife used to sing there and so it was "convenient" and "free" :mrgreen: I wouldn't have eaten there otherwise as I find hotel food exorbitant in price and I cannot eat ambiance so don't like paying for that. But I must say, it is good.

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Postby dazzlebabe » Thu, 09 Sep 2010 9:43 am

i absolutely love chicken rice (roasted!) with oyster sauce kailan and extra black sauce. Yum yum. Even visitors and their kids love eating chicken rice.

You get protein, starch and fibre all in one dish!

I heard the chef from Chatterbox left and set up his own chicken rice stall somewhere in the west. Can anyone verify?

My list (and these come from the young ones - the future leaders!)

1) Not holding the lift door open and looking at you as the door closes.
(I've noticed some "ahem" Europeans in my office building doing the same. B*stards!

2) Not saying thanks when you hold the door open for them. I feel the older folks tend to be more appreciative. Bizarre!

3) Talking and walking abreast and expect you to walk through the wall(on the grass, on the road, through the barrier) so that they can continue their conversation and not have to stop to let you through.

4) CYCLING ON FOOTPATH.

5) Parking motorbikes on footpath. and they seem to like parking in front of postboxes, hydrants etc.

Rant over. Thursday is the New Friday (this week!)
Just me

DazzleBabe

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 09 Sep 2010 11:21 am

dazzlebabe wrote:1) Not holding the lift door open and looking at you as the door closes.
(I've noticed some "ahem" Europeans in my office building doing the same. B*stards!


When in Rome........?

They are just trying to "assimilate" as the locals claim they don't do. When they do it - being rude or kiasu or trying to speak Singlish they are just trying to blend in and be like the local population. Shame the local population cannot see in the mirror isn't it. :-|

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Postby poodlek » Thu, 09 Sep 2010 12:24 pm

dazzlebabe wrote:
4) CYCLING ON FOOTPATH.



Sadly this isn't a purely Singaporean thing. I'm not sure if there's a law against it here. I know there is in Ontario, although it's rarely enforced. When at home, if I see someone riding on the sidewalk I pull the Singaporean trick and refuse to get out of the way for them. IMO, they *can* get the heck off the sidewalk to get around me. Here I get out of the way :)

Funny story about doors: My husband and an older local lady were approaching a single door that opened towards them at the same time. My husband quickened his pace a bit so he could get there to hold the door for her. She quickened her pace even more, thinking it was a race. Despite her scramble, my husband arrived first, and when he held the door open for her to go through, she looked at him all shocked and suspicious and quickly scrambled through the door and away. I wonder if she's still trying to figure out the trick he was trying to pull :P

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Postby carteki » Thu, 09 Sep 2010 12:53 pm

poodlek - thanks for the story - I loved it :D

As a cyclist I fully understand the cycling on the sidewalks - its the only way to reasonably ensure that I get to my destination unharmed.
But in general SG is majorly pedestrian unfriendly:
- shops and eateries spilling out onto the sidewalks
- rubbish bins left out to trip over
- cars parked on sidewalks
- pedestrian traffic lights being so short that it is not possible to cross the road at one change (and I walk FAST)
Did you know that in NY the pedestrian crossing is green for as long as the traffic light is green. So what if it causes congestion - more incentive for people to take public transport.

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Postby x9200 » Thu, 09 Sep 2010 1:19 pm

poodlek wrote:I'm not sure if there's a law against it here.

There is a law and it is illegal to ride on the pavement. So is riding the motorbike between the lanes and few hundreds other things cheerfully practised by everybody who only can move around. I vaguely recall reading at the traffic police website that they were going to allow some bike pavement riding in selected districts but not sure how did it end up.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 09 Sep 2010 1:29 pm

It is legal to ride on the pedesterian pathways in Tampines.

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Postby x9200 » Thu, 09 Sep 2010 1:40 pm

poodlek wrote:Funny story about doors: My husband and an older local lady were approaching a single door that opened towards them at the same time. My husband quickened his pace a bit so he could get there to hold the door for her. She quickened her pace even more, thinking it was a race. Despite her scramble, my husband arrived first, and when he held the door open for her to go through, she looked at him all shocked and suspicious and quickly scrambled through the door and away. I wonder if she's still trying to figure out the trick he was trying to pull :P


I had a trainee (young student) who, when we waked together, always rushed to help seeing me slowly opening any heavy door. I am over 1.8m tall and not exactly a weak posture neither and she (yes!) was like half of my size so not sure what did she think :) Probably just tried to be polite. I had to explain to her that I am doing it it this way not to hit somebody who can be just standing behind the door.

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Postby x9200 » Thu, 09 Sep 2010 1:45 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:It is legal to ride on the pedesterian pathways in Tampines.

Yep. This is this something I read earlier:
http://www.spf.gov.sg/feedback/newsrelease_footways.htm

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Postby curiousgeorge » Thu, 09 Sep 2010 2:03 pm

x9200 wrote:There is a law and it is illegal to ride on the pavement. So is riding the motorbike between the lanes and few hundreds other things cheerfully practised by everybody who only can move around.


I had a conversation about this with a TP at the Bukit Batok Driving Centre when I got my Singapore Driving Licence.

There is no law against lane splitting for motorbikes. However, any driver/rider can be done for reckless/dangerous driving/riding.

I pushed this point, and he said that it depends, but that lane splitting above 50km/h is "probably" considered reckless. Depends on the TP and whether you inconvenience any other driver.

This rumoured law against lane splitting is a car driver conspiracy started in frustration at the bikes that get to the head of the traffice queue at the lights :cool:

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Postby poodlek » Thu, 09 Sep 2010 2:22 pm

x9200 wrote:There is a law and it is illegal to ride on the pavement.

Yep. This is this something I read earlier:
http://www.spf.gov.sg/feedback/newsrelease_footways.htm


By pavement do you mean sidewalk? This article says cyclists are supposed to ride on the street.

Personally, as a cyclist I'd much prefer to ride on the street than have to weave around pedestrian traffic on the sidewalk. It's certainly a pet peeve of mine back home, as a friend of mine had her 12 week old puppy hit by a cyclist on the sidewalk who didn't even stop. The puppy had its two front legs broken. In Toronto, motorists are *much* more considerate and cautious than they are here, so there's really no excuse in TO to be riding on the sidewalk at any time, unless the cyclist is a child, riding at a child's pace. In Singapore, I can see a case for either side.


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