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Basal racism in Singapore

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Vaucluse
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Postby Vaucluse » Tue, 13 Oct 2009 1:31 pm

Bless you, my child. [-o<
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Postby smayrhofer » Tue, 13 Oct 2009 1:45 pm

Funny thing. I would probably just have thought he was a typical singaporean spitting on the sidewalk. I would never have thought that it was done as an insult to me!

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Postby barney11 » Wed, 21 Oct 2009 11:31 am

smayrhofer wrote:Funny thing. I would probably just have thought he was a typical singaporean spitting on the sidewalk. I would never have thought that it was done as an insult to me!


Singaporeans typically don't spit on sidewalks. You obviously haven't lived in Singapore long enough...

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 21 Oct 2009 12:19 pm

barney11 wrote:
smayrhofer wrote:Funny thing. I would probably just have thought he was a typical singaporean spitting on the sidewalk. I would never have thought that it was done as an insult to me!


Singaporeans typically don't spit on sidewalks. You obviously haven't lived in Singapore long enough...


Barney, you don't get out near enough yourself. I've been here 27 years and I see them spitting all the time (especially if they think nobody is watching them). Of course a lot of them aren't Singaporeans. But again, a lot of them are. :-|

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Postby Saint » Wed, 21 Oct 2009 12:40 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:
barney11 wrote:
smayrhofer wrote:Funny thing. I would probably just have thought he was a typical singaporean spitting on the sidewalk. I would never have thought that it was done as an insult to me!


Singaporeans typically don't spit on sidewalks. You obviously haven't lived in Singapore long enough...


Barney, you don't get out near enough yourself. I've been here 27 years and I see them spitting all the time (especially if they think nobody is watching them). Of course a lot of them aren't Singaporeans. But again, a lot of them are. :-|


I'm guessing he's only 11

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Postby ksl » Wed, 21 Oct 2009 2:19 pm

barney11 wrote:Most Singaporeans feel that spitting is ungracious and dirty. Come to think of it, no Singaporean I ever knew had a habit of spitting. Where do you get these ideas from? lol

Err yeah SMS i know you have been a PR here for 27 years. But I am like a Citizen, who has studied in government schools and done his NS? I am as Singaporean as you can get dude.
I think it actually depends on the areas of Singapore you are in.

I have also seen a lot of spitting from the older generation here over 50's and from less affluent backgrounds, though they will spit in the bin, if there is a bin to be found otherwise it's wham! at the feet of others, but not done intentionally in most cases. Habits die hard and some never die at all!

I have noticed that i myself cough more mucus up in specific seasons here in Singapore, and use quite a few packs of tissue. I think pollen and smoke maybe the cause

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Postby econoMIC » Wed, 21 Oct 2009 3:59 pm

Once outside Compass Point I saw a mother tell her son to do his business on the sidewalk in the drain. So he took out his willy, and started peeing in the drain on the sidewalk while many shoppers and residents walked past, right next to the roadside in front of the bus stop. How disgusting is that I said to my wife. I went to the lady and told her off for letting her son do this. Unfortunately she was Singaporean and didn't even get what my problem was. :(
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Postby x9200 » Wed, 21 Oct 2009 5:20 pm

ksl wrote:I have also seen a lot of spitting from the older generation here over 50's and from less affluent backgrounds, though they will spit in the bin, if there is a bin to be found otherwise it's wham! at the feet of others, but not done intentionally in most cases. Habits die hard and some never die at all!

During SARS time the newspapers were full of pictures of people caught by police for spitting on the street, judged and convicted in 24h. Of course they all could be foreigners

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Postby ksl » Wed, 21 Oct 2009 5:30 pm

x9200 wrote:
ksl wrote:I have also seen a lot of spitting from the older generation here over 50's and from less affluent backgrounds, though they will spit in the bin, if there is a bin to be found otherwise it's wham! at the feet of others, but not done intentionally in most cases. Habits die hard and some never die at all!

During SARS time the newspapers were full of pictures of people caught by police for spitting on the street, judged and convicted in 24h. Of course they all could be foreigners
Even foreigners have bad habits? But from a cultural habit, the Chinese come out on top for spitting in the street in my book especially on the mainland and Taiwan too!

Though i must admit that after 9 months in China, all foreigners would be spitting too because of the collective coal dust in the lungs. :P Yes it is a filthy habit and one not easy to break.

EconoMic:Once outside Compass Point I saw a mother tell her son to do his business on the sidewalk in the drain. So he took out his willy, and started peeing in the drain on the sidewalk while many shoppers and residents walked past, right next to the roadside in front of the bus stop. How disgusting is that I said to my wife. I went to the lady and told her off for letting her son do this. Unfortunately she was Singaporean and didn't even get what my problem was.


Again this doesn't surprise me at all after living in mainland China, it would have been seen as the normal thing to do back in the 90's, better to pee on the street than pee your pants...and quite a few grown up males would do that today. Not to mention i have seen adult women in Denmark drop their knickers to pee on the pavement after too many drinks too:oops: :shock:

Though the Chinese babies never really wore nappies, they had pants with open crutch, so they were taught to do it on the street, to those that have never seen it before it would be a disgusting sight, though the world is evolving slowly, back in the 90's i thought it quite a practical thing to stop nappy rash :lol:. As a father, you may also have to live with the situation when raising children, that it could happen to you too, though we would be far too embarrassed to do it on the side walk, and probably look for the nearest hedge, a warning to be prepared, when your child is nappy free. Though its not the childs fault, it's nature!

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Postby Vaucluse » Thu, 22 Oct 2009 9:36 am

econoMIC wrote:Once outside Compass Point I saw a mother tell her son to do his business on the sidewalk in the drain. So he took out his willy, and started peeing in the drain on the sidewalk while many shoppers and residents walked past, right next to the roadside in front of the bus stop. How disgusting is that I said to my wife. I went to the lady and told her off for letting her son do this. Unfortunately she was Singaporean and didn't even get what my problem was. :(


Do you have children? If you do, have you ever been in the situation with your child desperately needing to relieve him/herself and every second counts? Would you have preferred him to do it on the sidewalk?

You told her off? What a big legend you are . . . Telling a mother off in front of her child . . . you may be lucky not to have had your head kicked in if her husband was near . . . but then you wouldn't have done it, would you.

Maybe you don't get what your problem is.




(Umm, as an asterisk . . . how old was the boy?)
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Postby Addadude » Thu, 22 Oct 2009 10:47 am

Vaucluse wrote: (Umm, as an asterisk . . . how old was the boy?)


15.
"Both politicians and nappies need to be changed regularly, and for the same reasons."

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Postby Vaucluse » Thu, 22 Oct 2009 11:13 am

Addadude wrote:
Vaucluse wrote: (Umm, as an asterisk . . . how old was the boy?)


15.


Bang out of order then . . . we all know the cut-off age for peeing in public, unless drunk, is 12.
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Postby econoMIC » Thu, 22 Oct 2009 2:05 pm

Vaucluse wrote:
econoMIC wrote:Once outside Compass Point I saw a mother tell her son to do his business on the sidewalk in the drain. So he took out his willy, and started peeing in the drain on the sidewalk while many shoppers and residents walked past, right next to the roadside in front of the bus stop. How disgusting is that I said to my wife. I went to the lady and told her off for letting her son do this. Unfortunately she was Singaporean and didn't even get what my problem was. :(


Do you have children? If you do, have you ever been in the situation with your child desperately needing to relieve him/herself and every second counts? Would you have preferred him to do it on the sidewalk?

You told her off? What a big legend you are . . . Telling a mother off in front of her child . . . you may be lucky not to have had your head kicked in if her husband was near . . . but then you wouldn't have done it, would you.

Maybe you don't get what your problem is.




(Umm, as an asterisk . . . how old was the boy?)


Good rant Vaucluse. Unfortunately a rather pointless rant. It was outside Compass Point and the nearest toilet was (I am not joking) 30 seconds away. She had just walked past it on her way out! There is no way you can justify this. You children or not. If there is a toilet 20 metres around the corner it should be possible to not urinate where people walk (the drain was in the middle of the sidewalk) and instead walk the 20 metres to the loo. The boy was 10 or 12 by my reckoning. At that age children should have the bladder control to keep it in five more minutes, or in this case 30 more seconds.
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Postby vbelle » Thu, 22 Oct 2009 2:14 pm

what curious me is that..if the boy is 10/12..why didnt he feel embarrassed?

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Postby ksl » Thu, 22 Oct 2009 3:24 pm

vbelle wrote:what curious me is that..if the boy is 10/12..why didnt he feel embarrassed?


Odd that most boys would be far to embarrassed, though could be from mainland China which was a very normal occurrence to squat in the gutter back in the 1990's.

There was a street very close to the language institute that reeked of urine, every day the meet wagon would come and throw the meet on the dusty, road track, it was quite nauseating.

Having raised my own kids, I have also had several embarrassing situations while out pushing the push chair, and i recall times when they couldn't hold it long enough to reach a toilet, not there fault at all even if 5 or 6 years old. It can be quite a traumatic event for the child, who requires full emotional support. I find the topic quite educational to be honest!


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