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locals & expatriates how you find Singapore?

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SGBoyxxx
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locals & expatriates how you find Singapore?

Postby SGBoyxxx » Mon, 05 Oct 2009 4:52 pm

do you enjoy your life here?

boring?fun?

just curious.

since I am a singaporean here ,

sometimes during weekend I don;t know where to chill up.

everywhere is just shopping centres.

normally I just hangout with frds went to orchard for a walk/eat sometime watch movie.

whereas sometime will go to exhibition example IT show.

I am just curious about those locals & expatriates living in sg .
some of them find it boring in sg .
whereas some find sg is unique and fun.

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Postby SGBoyxxx » Mon, 05 Oct 2009 5:01 pm

I am asking because I happen to see this

Finally Leaving Singapore
by Patricia Tan


It's late afternoon; I've been packing all day. My living room's littered with cardboard boxes to be picked up tomorrow by an international Moving Company. I'm tired and sweaty, and my back aches from lifting heavy piles of books. But there's a smile on my face that won't go away: my husband and I are finally leaving Singapore.

I'm a thirty year old Australian and have been living in Singapore for eight years. Love brought me here: my partner is Singaporean. We met at a university in my home town, Perth, Western Australia. After we graduated, I followed him to Singapore.

It was exciting at first. Having never lived anywhere else besides the small, quiet city of Perth, Singapore struck me as a cosmopolitan metropolis, a financial hub, a bustling shipping port. It seemed like my future here would be bright and happy.

Now I can't wait to leave. I despise Singapore and have wanted to leave for years. Packing up all of our personal belongings and moving back to Australia feels like a dream come true.

Shoes are next on my packing checklist. It horrifies me to discover that my favorite pair of leather boots is covered in mildew. This follows an earlier discovery of mildew on clothes in the back of my wardrobe. The small fortune we have spent on dehumidifiers has not helped at all. Frustrated, I wipe the sweat from my brow and more beads of sweat appear almost immediately. Curse the constant hot and humid weather here! It'll be wonderful to experience four seasons again, to feel chilly winter winds and curl up beneath a warm blanket. The perennial tropical climate in Singapore is definitely not for me.

To calm down, I look at the view outside my living room window. It's raining heavily, like it has been every afternoon for the past two weeks. It's monsoon season. There are large waterlogged fields of grass on my right. On my left looming block of residential flats nearly identical to my own. They remind me of pigeon holes in an office mailing room. It's probably only a matter of time until the grass fields are developed into more flats. Living space is a premium on this tiny island with over four million people.

photo credit: Patricia TanSingapore's crowded environment has never suited me. There are high rise buildings, people and cars everywhere. The lack of wide open space is stifling. Homesickness overwhelms me, making me long for a drive through the countryside just outside of Perth.

The high density living here has also created an unspoken class system. More than 80% of the population, including my partner and me, live in "HDB flats" built by a government organization called the Housing Development Board. Those who can afford a bit more live in private condominiums. Those who are even more affluent live in houses, which most Singaporeans refer to as "landed property". Moving from an HDB flat to a private condominium or landed property is called "upgrading" rather than simply "moving". When speaking to Singaporeans who live in more "upgraded" abodes, I sometimes feel like they are looking down on me. Such as when my ex-boss--a pampered girl in her mid-30's who still lives with her parents in their large luxurious house--said to me, "I don't mean to sound spoilt, but I cannot imagine living in an HDB flat."

Upgrading, earning more money, and gaining more material possessions are top priorities here.

It also seems important to keep track of the financial status of others. No one wants to lose or get left behind. 'Kiasu' (Hokkien for "scared to lose") is a term I often hear Singaporeans use when describing their fellow Singaporeans. Asking people, even strangers, nosey questions about their income or how much they paid for their home, car and other assets is a common occurrence (something that I find inappropriate and cannot get used to).

Singaporeans are not exactly known for their tact. In general, they come across as rude and obnoxious. Pushing, shoving, asking inappropriate personal questions, making personal remarks (they seem particularly fond of criticizing a person's appearance directly to their face), not bothering to say things like "excuse me" or "thank you", cutting queues, spitting on the floor, yelling and scolding at the drop of a hat, changing lanes on the road without signaling, and not holding the elevator door open are common behaviors. It is no surprise that the Singapore government has been running a "courtesy campaign" for years in an attempt to encourage manners.

Editor's note: before sending protesting emails to the author, please read another expat's similar point of view.

I can't wait to leave this tiny, overcrowded, hot and humid island full of rude, materialistic people!

With renewed vigor, I resume packing and feel a sense of relief. It feels like every item that goes into a box brings me a step further away from Singapore.

Whilst packing our photo albums, it occurs to me that we have accumulated a large collection. My favorite is our wedding album. It brings back happy memories. Friends and relatives flew in to Singapore to celebrate our wedding. Everyone I love was here enjoying a one week vacation. We went to the famous Orchard Road shopping district and Sentosa Island. Friends and family also joined me for a tour of the Night Safari, where I worked as a zoo volunteer. During that week, I would not have traded places with anyone else in the world.

Our wedding album reminds me that my partner and I became a family in Singapore. His family, particularly his mother, welcomed me with open arms. Although my mother-in-law and I barely speak each other's languages (her main language is Cantonese and mine is English), we have developed a bond. Our weekend dinners will be sorely missed. She remembers that I cannot get enough of her herbal chicken soup.

I take the time to look around my flat. It may be a simple 3 bedroom 2 bathroom HDB flat that some people look down upon. But I am proud of it. It is our first home as a married couple. We decorated it together. It holds fond memories of parties we have thrown and friends we entertained here.

During my time in Singapore, I have made friends with Singaporeans who are kind, warm and genuine--friends from the Night Safari, friends of my partner, and friends from the insurance company where I worked. They are people whose company I enjoy and will miss when we leave. It dawns on me that it is not fair to say that everyone in Singapore is rude and obnoxious. There are nice people here.

Singapore actually has many good points. It has a vibrant nightlife and lots of good restaurants. The train system is clean and efficient, which makes it easy to move around without a car (as opposed to the dependency on cars that is rife in Perth). There is a low crime rate and I often go out on my own for evening strolls along the well lit streets (something that I would never dare to do in Perth). The shopping is fantastic and I will miss certain boutiques that do not exist in Australia. Singapore has also been a great place to gain work experience and build up my resume.

My reluctance to leave surprises me.

The thought of moving back to Australia actually makes me nervous. Will I find it easy to fit back into Australian society? Will I experience reverse culture shock? Will my work experience be recognized? Will people mistake me for an expatriate Singaporean instead of an Australian repatriate?

By nightfall, the boxes in my living room are completely full. They contain all of the items that make a person feel at home-clothes, photographs, books, DVDs, ornaments, appliances and crockery. They are filled with years of memories that my partner and I accumulated in Singapore. It finally registers that I have developed a comfort zone and made a home here.

With a tinge of sadness, I seal up the last box of my belongings.

It is time to move on and continue my bittersweet journey back to Australia.

http://www.familylifeabroad.com/LeavingSingapore.html

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econoMIC
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Postby econoMIC » Mon, 05 Oct 2009 5:59 pm

Welcome to the forum. You might want to use the search function first. This topic has been discussed to a sickening extend already because for some reasons new members love to use this topic for their first post while they can't tame their excitement of coming to Singapore.

PS: yes we (expats) all like it in Singapore, that is why we are here (sort of makes sense given the fact that we are expats and could always go home to our native country). Regarding the locals: many of those who want to leave do so, but as in every country on the planet, the grass is always greener on the other side and you can't always please everyone.
a.k.a. littlegreenman

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Saint
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Postby Saint » Mon, 05 Oct 2009 11:06 pm

SGBoyxxx wrote:I am asking because I happen to see this

Finally Leaving Sing.....


Got this far reading this and got bored :roll:

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sundaymorningstaple
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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 06 Oct 2009 12:11 am

Saint wrote:
SGBoyxxx wrote:I am asking because I happen to see this

Finally Leaving Sing.....


Got this far reading this and got bored :roll:


Actually his cut & paste job is a lot easier to read than trying to decipher what the devil he writes himself. If I didin't know he was from hardwarezone, I'd swear he's from the depths of sgforum!

tayhm62
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Postby tayhm62 » Mon, 02 Nov 2009 12:46 am

Guess not only expats are leaving Singapore. Singaporeans are leaving too.


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