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Ambulances waiting at red lights?

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Ambulances waiting at red lights?

Postby QRM » Wed, 29 Jul 2009 9:10 pm

The other day I was sitting in the car at a red stop light, next to me a ambulance pulled up siren and lights blaring and flashing, it stops and waits for the lights to turn green :shock:, it didn't even attempt to drive down the empty wrong side of the road.

I asked a Local who was with me why the two cars in front of it does not get out of the way? He pointed out they would be breaking the rules and to let the Emergency vehicle through on a red light may cause a bigger accident.

I am stunned after 5 years of being here I have accepted alot of "oddness" but this really takes the biscuit. If it was me in the ambulance with a sick or dying kid or family member, I would kick the driver out and drive it myself, or at least get out and tell the berks in front to drive up the pavement to make way.

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Postby Plavt » Wed, 29 Jul 2009 9:24 pm

I understand what you are saying but what are the directives issued to Ambulance drivers? Even here in the UK those driving emergency vehicles can still be prosecuted for driving through red lights emergency or not although that rarely if ever happens. :-k

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Postby QRM » Wed, 29 Jul 2009 9:33 pm

Plavt wrote:I understand what you are saying but what are the directives issued to Ambulance drivers? Even here in the UK those driving emergency vehicles can still be prosecuted for driving through red lights emergency or not although that rarely if ever happens. :-k


OK red light is one thing but the drivers in front not even bothering to try and get out of his way? I know in the UK the biggest central London gridlock parts like Moses and red sea when needed, by driving up pavements etc. In fact used to enjoy the chance to test the 4x4 suspension by bouncing up and driving along the pavement to let a fire engine through, and I have to confess try and tail gate it to squeeze through the traffic jam.

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Postby ksl » Wed, 29 Jul 2009 10:00 pm

Now you can understand just how dangerous this place is, when an emergency breaks out, all hell will break lose.

Look around you, when you are out in the tourist area's and see if you can see any fire fighting equipment, I said to my wife while on Sentose, if their was an emergency here, many would die in the stampede and there are no fire extinguishers to be seen inside of the buildings.

HDB flats are also time bombs waiting to blow, with only one way out, and that is a locked metal gate. I have put smoke alarms up, and have a planned route out!

Also I think most of the crew are NS men, probably with limited skill levels, that I have seen.

Advanced driving skills are needed for emergency driving, and one can still be prosecuted if you are the cause of an accident, even the police are liable.

All though the courts do use commonsense in these type of cases.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 29 Jul 2009 11:26 pm

That's one of the reasons why I bought a 2nd story flat. a pair of emergency jacobs ladders in two of the bedrooms sorts out the alternate escape route and by only being on the second story no need to worry about having to jump the last bit. Course 20 years on Oil Rigs tends to make one very fire conscious. Especially having been burned up a bit on one in 1978.

http://www.amazon.com/Kidde-468094-25-F ... _hi_text_b

These are similar to what I have. Brought them back from one of my home trips right after buying the flat 10 years ago. I'm sure you can find something similar here though.

Edited to add link
Last edited by sundaymorningstaple on Thu, 30 Jul 2009 8:57 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Postby littlegreenman » Thu, 30 Jul 2009 12:14 am

ksl wrote: ...HDB flats are also time bombs waiting to blow, with only one way out, and that is a locked metal gate. I have put smoke alarms up, and have a planned route out!


I actually wrote a letter about this to our MP once. Never got a reply. In the first place I am wondering why you need a metal gate on the front door (ground floor units maybe but higher up?) in a country that is so very safe. That is a huge safety risk. Mark my words, one day one of them HDB blocks is going to burn out and they will be looking for the charred bodies of many children or old that didn't make it out and the rescue crews couldn't make it in on time. Sad. Also some of those very old HDBs can be like a maze with no labeling pointing to the nearest exit route.

QRM wrote:I know in the UK the biggest central London gridlock parts like Moses and red sea when needed, by driving up pavements etc. In fact used to enjoy the chance to test the 4x4 suspension by bouncing up and driving along the pavement to let a fire engine through, and I have to confess try and tail gate it to squeeze through the traffic jam.


Amen! You have a lot of very aggressive drivers here in London and many are speeding and jumping lanes, it is terrible. But once a rescue vehicle comes through even the narrowest A-road becomes clearer than the orbital will ever be at 3am.

sundaymorningstaple wrote:That's one of the reasons why I bought a 2nd story flat. a pair of emergency jacobs ladders in two of the bedrooms sorts out the alternate escape route and by only being on the second story no need to worry about having to jump the last bit. Course 20 years on Oil Rigs tends to make one very fire conscious. Especially having been burned up a bit on one in 1978.


LOL, good man! Another one of SMS' stories.

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Postby morenangpinay » Thu, 30 Jul 2009 7:20 am

crap i live in an hdb. lol yah theres only one exit..and even all the windows have grills.

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Postby Asdracles » Thu, 30 Jul 2009 10:24 am

You have metal gates, but nobody forces you to lock it.....

In all the time I have been living here, I have never lock the gate when I'm at home.

But right, the HBD design is a bit strange in a country where they care so much about safety and related issues

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 30 Jul 2009 11:10 am

Frankly, the design dovetails perfectly with the governments attitude towards it population here if you think about it.

People here are nothing but drones who are programmed to not to analyze too closely and just be worker drones. As the government like to call the population "Human Capital" (depreciable assets) the housing arrangements for that 94% of the population are basically holding facilities (garage?) much like the chicken coops where egg layers are kept until they can no longer lay. Once they are used up, they are tossed on the heap for junk. Similar to what is done here once you hit 55. So, as life is considered cheap in Asia, why build a back door and incur more costs than necessary? :-|

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Postby hibri2 » Thu, 30 Jul 2009 11:31 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:Frankly, the design dovetails perfectly with the governments attitude towards it population here if you think about it.

People here are nothing but drones who are programmed to not to analyze too closely and just be worker drones. As the government like to call the population "Human Capital" (depreciable assets) the housing arrangements for that 94% of the population are basically holding facilities (garage?) much like the chicken coops where egg layers are kept until they can no longer lay. Once they are used up, they are tossed on the heap for junk. Similar to what is done here once you hit 55. So, as life is considered cheap in Asia, why build a back door and incur more costs than necessary? :-|


that was a really spot on comment

just wanted to add that everything you describe is basically an effect of the confucianism practiced around here and could explain why the population wont complain (even if they feel that it is not safe for them), that is one of the reasons "individuals [life] is cheap in asia", they are logs to burn to keep the "community" fire working...
"Do not pray in my school, and I will not think in your church." - Unknown.

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Postby ScoobyDoes » Thu, 30 Jul 2009 11:57 am

So what, under the SG Highway Code, am i supposed to do if i'm sitting first at the traffic lights with the blues-&-twos going on in my lughole just behind, assuming i can even hear them over my CD? ;)

I would automatically move out the way, if clear to do so, based on UK training and a sense of moral obligation but........

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Postby littlegreenman » Thu, 30 Jul 2009 1:45 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:...So, as life is considered cheap in Asia, why build a back door and incur more costs than necessary? :-|


But then why does every flat come with a storage room, err of course I mean BOMB SHELTER! That might be the point I missed so far. So if your flat is on fire you might just want to go into your bomb shelter? Then again you might suffocate in there until the fire is out. Would the bomb shelter be adequate protection?

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 30 Jul 2009 2:35 pm

The Bomb Shelter was designed to keep the economy going. It is designed as a maids quarters (that's why there's an electrical point and lights in side) As it's too small for a small bedroom, it's considered as a "Maid" Quarters UNLESS there is a smaller utility room off the kitchen (then that is the "Maids" quarters and the Bomb Shelter become a storage room inanimate objects have more priority that a lowly maid.

Oh, the economy.....

As the Bomb Shelter is too small for a normal single bed, you have to have one custom made as well as a mattress so that gives the local furniture uncle some extra cash making miniture beds for short maids and too small quarters. :wink:

I say this Image but unfortunately all too often it's true! :x

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Postby ScoobyDoes » Thu, 30 Jul 2009 2:55 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:As the Bomb Shelter is too small for a normal single bed, you have to have one custom made as well as a mattress so that gives the local furniture uncle some extra cash making miniture beds for short maids and too small quarters. :wink:



You mean like the tiny sofas that get bolted inside the back of a Renault Kangoo? :lol:

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Postby morenangpinay » Thu, 30 Jul 2009 3:03 pm

er they probly expect the maid to sleep standing up. lol


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