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Is it worth spending too much money on 2B license?

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dannysg
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Is it worth spending too much money on 2B license?

Postby dannysg » Sat, 18 Jul 2009 12:33 pm

Hi all,
I'm half way on my 2B riding course in SSDC. Actually, I do not need to ride a bike so urgently but my office is nearby so I just take that advantage to get a license before the school moves to Woodsland in March next year. At first, I felt ok since I had a chance to get some experiences on how to ride a bike with clutch which I have never tried before. I am quite happy since now I can confidently control the bike as I wish. However, I feel like the assessment there is too strict and very hard to pass since we got only one chance to go through the assessment route. I am sure I can pass if I just keep spending money to book for the assessment. There are a few lessons and TP test ahead which I foresee a lot of possibility of spending more and more :-|. It's too costly for me just to get a 2B license for my convenience and I have no intention to buy a bike right after I get the license. Now I am in a dilemma whether I should quit the course or not :?. Any advice?

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Postby Strong Eagle » Sun, 19 Jul 2009 11:38 am

As a biker I think you should complete the course and buy a motorbike.

Riding in Singapore is very convenient... traffic hassles are minimized. Parking is cheap or even free in many places.

And it is far less expensive than owning a car.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sun, 19 Jul 2009 3:58 pm

Unfortunately, good rider or not though, your chances of being injured or killed increases exponentially when you ride a bike here. The cage drivers have no regard for two wheeled vehicles at all. On the other hand, most bikers here deserve to be snuffed here anyway with their bad riding habits (which occurs mostly with bikes smaller than 400cc anyway). Real bikers, riding motorcycles, not motorbikes, tend to respect the traffic laws better.

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dannysg
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Postby dannysg » Sun, 19 Jul 2009 5:20 pm

A lot of people say riding a motorbike in Singapore is very dangerous but everyday there are also a lot of people taking queue numbers to enroll in riding courses, including me. Some of my friends convert their foreign license in the morning and buy a motorbike in the evening on the same day. They even laugh at me for not being able to buy a bike here (since I do not own a foreign license).

I enrolled in a 2B riding course in SSDC and have gone through a lot of pain in their lessons. My friends, (who are proud of themselves for being able to ride in Singapore and spending less than 100 bucks on their license), again, said that I'm stupid for spending too much money on riding lessons.

Actually, partly I feel like loosing face since most of my friends laugh at me when they are on their bike and see me waiting at the bus stop, partly I want to explore how to control a big bike. I found the course helpful but the problem is I will have to spend a lot of money (nearly 1K or more) to get a license, not to mention I need to save up to invest a bike and pay monthly expense such as season parking, fuel, maintenance, insurance, road tax, ERP .... Taking public transport is the best way to save money and minimize the risk of being hit by reckless cars on the road .... I understand all these things but I can't help the temptation of getting a bike for my own convenience. However, it is too expensive just for a license ... I wish I could have a foreign license to convert :(

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Postby AngMoKio » Mon, 20 Jul 2009 6:26 am

Dannysg,

From my riding experience as long as you approach it as being a -serious- sport and not a casual way to get around, you chances of accident and injury are diminished. As long as you are honing you skills and not riding above your level you tend to be much more alert to the foibles of other drivers. Is complacency that really gets you in trouble.

Of course, you can always be unlucky.

FWIW - I don't ride here, I don't have a foreign endorsement to move over (although I have ridden a bit.) So, I will be in the same boat as you.... probably taking my 2b. Not for casual transportation, but I -really- enjoy the short weekend ride and Singapore seems like a fun place to get around that way. Honestly, even if I could just switch my license over I would be taking a refresher course. My skills are just too rusty.

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Postby Strong Eagle » Mon, 20 Jul 2009 8:28 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:Unfortunately, good rider or not though, your chances of being injured or killed increases exponentially when you ride a bike here. The cage drivers have no regard for two wheeled vehicles at all. On the other hand, most bikers here deserve to be snuffed here anyway with their bad riding habits (which occurs mostly with bikes smaller than 400cc anyway). Real bikers, riding motorcycles, not motorbikes, tend to respect the traffic laws better.


Singapore is a much safer place to ride a motorbike than most other cities, whether they be Asian, European, or American. The drivers here have much better bike consciousness than most other cities; not to say that there are not idiots. The speeds are overall slower as well.

It is perfectly possible to ride safely and without incident for 100's of thousands of miles. It means being a defensive rider. Riding a motorcycle does not imply that your chances of having an accident are greater; in fact, US studies show that on a per mile basis, motorcycle riders have less accidents per miles driven.

But, if you do have an accident you may end up with a broken leg while the cage driver gets a dent in her door. Besides doing the 2B riding course you'll want to become a proficient motorcycle rider, learning to identify well in advance the potentially dangerous situations and deciding how to deal with them.

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Postby carlesmarx » Mon, 28 Jun 2010 12:59 am

Where is it that I can change my international motorbike driving license?

Now, I can drive all kind of bikes (it is European/Spanish license). Would they give me class 2B only, or 2? in case I get a 2B what can I do to get Class 2?

Thx!

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Postby Strong Eagle » Mon, 28 Jun 2010 7:25 am

carlesmarx wrote:Where is it that I can change my international motorbike driving license?

Now, I can drive all kind of bikes (it is European/Spanish license). Would they give me class 2B only, or 2? in case I get a 2B what can I do to get Class 2?

Thx!


You don't convert an international driving license, you convert a license from your home country. If they only give you a 2b, you need to take the 2a and then class 2 rider courses to get an unlimited.

http://driving-in-singapore.spf.gov.sg/ ... ersion.htm

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Postby Sinan » Tue, 29 Jun 2010 12:47 am

Hi there

Got my licence 2b 4 months ago, and it's worth it despite the long process to get it! Riding in singapore is really nice and really convinient!

A lot of people told me that it's quite dangerous... but ok if you're careful on the road, esp. on lorries and taxi drivers. I believe that it's much more safe compared to some european countries, people are generally careful here.. at least it's my feeling...

Go and get a bike, it's a life change here! :)

Do not hesitate to contact me =)

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Postby x9200 » Tue, 29 Jun 2010 8:12 am

Sinan wrote:A lot of people told me that it's quite dangerous... but ok if you're careful on the road, esp. on lorries and taxi drivers. I believe that it's much more safe compared to some european countries, people are generally careful here.. at least it's my feeling...

Actually I think lorry drivers are among the best drivers in Singapore. They are much more careful on what their are doing than the swarming average. They also often know how to drive a car :) Lorries are big and have more blind spot areas but this is not the fault of their drivers. Taxi drivers, yes, agree - here is a typical syndrome where random unqualified ppl are doing a job that makes them thinking they are better drivers. And if you want to increase your safety significantly install HID lights on your bike. The difference in No of various morons that tried to push me out of my way with their cars before and after installing it was truly dramatic.

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Postby Strong Eagle » Tue, 29 Jun 2010 11:26 am

Yes, lights make a difference, as does a loud horn. Bus drivers are also very good. Also, if you wear clothes that mimic TP colors it seems to help.

In order of danger to bikers:

a) Large expensive automobiles, whose owners think their road tax payment gives them total ownership of all lanes. No problem in trying to push you out of the way.

b) Goods vehicle drivers who always seem to be in a hurry and never learned to drive.

c) Taxi drivers... mostly scooting over for a fare.

d) Expat female drivers who just don't like the idea of a motorcycle sharing a lane.

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Postby x9200 » Wed, 30 Jun 2010 11:37 am

I would add to this group some young and immature idiots in tuned-like cars speeding and abruptly changing the lanes. Not really Singapore specific but pretty big population driving around. My only single encounter where somebody acted like deliberately trying to kill me was with one of those. The guy just changed the lane jumping directly in front of me so I had to push the brake. I flashed my lights and then he simply hit the break so if was less vigilant I would get smashed against his back. Unfortunately I was shocked to that extent that I did not memorized his licence plate No.

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Postby maiku » Mon, 30 Aug 2010 1:22 pm

dont ride a bike. please, just save yourself.

riding a bike is like suicide, in a slower way. Or probably just gambling with your life. :?

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Postby Strong Eagle » Mon, 30 Aug 2010 2:07 pm

maiku wrote:dont ride a bike. please, just save yourself.

riding a bike is like suicide, in a slower way. Or probably just gambling with your life. :?


You really don't know what you are talking about. I've ridden motorcycles for hundreds of thousands of miles, in many countries and cities, without incident. What matters is if you know what you are doing, a proficient motorcyclist.

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Postby revhappy » Mon, 30 Aug 2010 5:39 pm

@Maiku, I understand from your other post that you drive a BMW 5 series.

I have a few one liners for you:

Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul
Four wheels is transportation. Two wheels is an attitude
Only a Biker knows why a dog sticks his head out of a car window

:)


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