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Happy St Patrick's Day!

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Happy St Patrick's Day!

Postby ozchick » Tue, 17 Mar 2009 6:43 am

And top of the mornin' to you all!

Goin' to Ireland for the first time in a few weeks. Anybody with a list of 'must see'/must do' places there?
Gonna see the Catholic part and all- just a wee peek in there where my forebearers came from.....jeesh....better not tell them my mother's side was English! :-|
'Are you trying to tempt me because I come from the land of plenty?'

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 17 Mar 2009 9:41 am

And what has caused you to grace us with your presence this fine mornin'? :P Only been around 3 weeks or so! Didn't know you were a partial paddy!

Hope the English side wasn't a scouser as well! :P

Have a good trip!

sms

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Postby durain » Tue, 17 Mar 2009 9:46 am

gonna have some fun with the paddy lads in the office today. thanks a million for the reminder. :)

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Postby Addadude » Tue, 17 Mar 2009 12:36 pm

Hi Ozchick

It depends how long you are going to be in Ireland. Off the top of my head:

My hometown Dublin:

Dublin city centre is easily small enough to walk across so it's well worth a look around. South of the river you'll find Grafton Street, Trinity College (well worth a wander - and check out the Book of Kells), Merrion and Stephen's Green, College Green and, if you walk far enough, the Liberties. Cross north over O'Connell Bridge and you'll find yourself in O'Connell Street, Dublin's main street. I personally would advise you to be more cautious here as it's noticeably 'rougher' in this area and there is a higher incidence of street crime.

Visiting the Guinness Storehouse is a MUST. It offers a real eye opener in how they brew the magical potion. By the time you finish the tour, you will find yourself at the very top of the brewery in the Gravity Bar - at all of 12 storeys high... (This passes fora skyscraper in Dublin!). If you time your visit right you can enjoy the sunset over panoramic views of Dublin city with a complimentary pint of the black stuff. See http://www.guinness-storehouse.com/en/Index.aspx for more details.

For a slightly more spooky experience, you should visit the 'mummies' in the basement of St. Michan's Church. This is really interesting (and my Significant Other was absolutely delighted with her visit there). See http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Eu ... -BR-1.html for more info.

For a good example of a classic irish boozer, check out McDaid's off Grafton Street. Additionally, Conway's in Parnell Street does an excellent all-day 'Irish Breakfast' - a true heart attack on a plate.

The National Art Gallery and the National Museum are worth a visit, though the museum is kind of small. (they are within a 5 minute walk of each other.

Take a trip on the DART (Dublin's answer to the MRT) north and south and you'll able to see most of the coastline from Malahide to Bray. As you pass by Dalkey you might be able to see Bono's house on the hill overlooking Dalkey Bay and Chris de Burgh's house.

If you really MUST shop, Dundrum Shopping Centre is supposedly the second largest shopping mall in Europe. You can take the LUAS (which is kind of like a tram system) there from Dublin city centre.

Further afield:

You absolutely HAVE to check out the megalithic tombs of Newgrange, Dowth and Knowth. See http://www.knowth.com/newgrange.htm These places are arguably Ireland's answer to Stonehenge.

In the extreme west coast of Ireland, you'll find the Burren - a unique landscape of limestone. This part of Ireland is also the Gelteacht, where irish (or Gailge) is spoken exclusively.

South west and you'll find the beautiful, rugged scenery of the Dingle Peninsula and the mountains of Kerry. Further south and you come to the county of Cork - again beautiful scenery and the home of the quite remarkable Garnish Island - which actually enjoys 'almost' tropical weather due to the Gulf Stream. Cork city itself is a wonderful and generally friendly place with a pub very 20 feet or so.

Hope all the above helps!

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Postby ozchick » Tue, 17 Mar 2009 5:52 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:And what has caused you to grace us with your presence this fine mornin'? :P Only been around 3 weeks or so! Didn't know you were a partial paddy!

sms


Well I'm a partial paddy if one counts one's great grandfather! Many Aussies are in the same boat I 'spose- had to come from somewhere ....

So you noticed me missing sms- aw shucks I'm chuffed! (Try saying that when you're drunk!) :)
'Are you trying to tempt me because I come from the land of plenty?'

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Postby ozchick » Tue, 17 Mar 2009 6:02 pm

Addadude wrote:Hi Ozchick

It depends how long you are going to be in Ireland. Off the top of my head:

My hometown Dublin:

Dublin city centre is easily small enough to walk across so it's well worth a look around. South of the river you'll find Grafton Street, Trinity College (well worth a wander - and check out the Book of Kells), Merrion and Stephen's Green, College Green and, if you walk far enough, the Liberties. Cross north over O'Connell Bridge and you'll find yourself in O'Connell Street, Dublin's main street. I personally would advise you to be more cautious here as it's noticeably 'rougher' in this area and there is a higher incidence of street crime.

Visiting the Guinness Storehouse is a MUST. It offers a real eye opener in how they brew the magical potion. By the time you finish the tour, you will find yourself at the very top of the brewery in the Gravity Bar - at all of 12 storeys high... (This passes fora skyscraper in Dublin!). If you time your visit right you can enjoy the sunset over panoramic views of Dublin city with a complimentary pint of the black stuff. See http://www.guinness-storehouse.com/en/Index.aspx for more details.

For a slightly more spooky experience, you should visit the 'mummies' in the basement of St. Michan's Church. This is really interesting (and my Significant Other was absolutely delighted with her visit there). See http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Eu ... -BR-1.html for more info.

For a good example of a classic irish boozer, check out McDaid's off Grafton Street. Additionally, Conway's in Parnell Street does an excellent all-day 'Irish Breakfast' - a true heart attack on a plate.

The National Art Gallery and the National Museum are worth a visit, though the museum is kind of small. (they are within a 5 minute walk of each other.

Take a trip on the DART (Dublin's answer to the MRT) north and south and you'll able to see most of the coastline from Malahide to Bray. As you pass by Dalkey you might be able to see Bono's house on the hill overlooking Dalkey Bay and Chris de Burgh's house.

If you really MUST shop, Dundrum Shopping Centre is supposedly the second largest shopping mall in Europe. You can take the LUAS (which is kind of like a tram system) there from Dublin city centre.

Further afield:

You absolutely HAVE to check out the megalithic tombs of Newgrange, Dowth and Knowth. See http://www.knowth.com/newgrange.htm These places are arguably Ireland's answer to Stonehenge.

In the extreme west coast of Ireland, you'll find the Burren - a unique landscape of limestone. This part of Ireland is also the Gelteacht, where irish (or Gailge) is spoken exclusively.

South west and you'll find the beautiful, rugged scenery of the Dingle Peninsula and the mountains of Kerry. Further south and you come to the county of Cork - again beautiful scenery and the home of the quite remarkable Garnish Island - which actually enjoys 'almost' tropical weather due to the Gulf Stream. Cork city itself is a wonderful and generally friendly place with a pub very 20 feet or so.

Hope all the above helps!


Well my Lordy wordy yes it does ! And straight from the horse's mouth too! What more could the young Ozchick want!? Jeezaloo thia amounts to services rendered Addadude- how much do you charge?! :wink:
Cork and Kerry are where the old GGP's came from..........
I reckon too that I got to hear some Irish music in an Irish setting..ah to be sure t'will set the wee heart a-flutterin'...ooh I feel the wee tears welling up already.. "Oh Danny Boy"......ooh... :oops:
Thanks again!
'Are you trying to tempt me because I come from the land of plenty?'

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A Belated Grand Slam Winning St. Paddy's Day To You Too...

Postby Dave Magoo » Sun, 22 Mar 2009 10:37 am

Hi Ozchick and a belated Happy St. Paddy's Day to you from a very proud 'plastic' Irishman today (we just won the Rugby Grand Slam overnight, which is great for you as the party will still be going for sure when you go there, even if it's a month from now!!).

Well, I saw that you're on your way to the Emerald Jewel of Europe, and couldn't resist adding a little to Addadude's splendid summary. You must excuse me if some parts overlap, but here are some things that I'd add based on a lifetime of popping over the pond on a regular basis to see the rellies et al (even up to a grand Irish wedding last September in the wilds of Connemara):

1. For Dublin, not much to add to Addadude's fine effort, but would suggest that, for once, don't be ashamed to do the open-topped bus tour (I'd usually avoid like the plague, but did on one visit to Dublin for a different perspective and was very pleasantly surprised). The bus tour I did included the 'poet's tour' where you can get to check out Ireland's numerous literary giants, as well as take in the ABSOLUTE MUST of the Guinness Brewery Tour, as Addadude suggested. There are numerous buses doing the rounds, so you can jump on and off at your own pace and get to take your time wherever you want to go. Look out for 'Brogan's Bar" too not far from the Guinness Brewery...if you see it, drop by for a cheeky pint of the Black & White, let them know you know a 'young' Irishman by the name of Dave Brogan from Granard, Co.Longford, and you may earn yourself a free pint!!

2. For the rest, if you can, try to hire a car and then 'drive Ireland' if possible. You see so much more that way. If starting in Dublin, take the coast road south through Waterford, Wexford and onwards to the hallowed counties of Cork and Kerry, as previously saluted. If time, take in the likes of Tipperary town too, if only to prove that it is indeed a long way to go :-)

3. For traditional live Irish music, you can never go wrong wherever you go, but I've always found places in Galway City and Co. Clare to be particularly good in this respect. I suspect you're too early in the year to catch a music festival, but look out for them nevertheless. There is a particularly famous one in Lisdoonvarna, County Clare, for which, if it's not festival season, the music in the pubs is still particularly "grand" all year round :-) Regardless of the music situation, the wild west coast of Connemara, Co. Galway is another must for sure :-)...as I say, I was there again last September for a cousin's wedding, and I never fail to be blown away by it's beauty and preserved Irish heritage.

4. Final tip for now, make sure you abandon any notion of luxurious 5 star hotel accommodation, and instead aim for the traditional Irish B & B lifestyle for most of your trip, particularly when in the rural havens of Cork, Kerry, and Galway/Connemara. They are cheap, cheerful, generally of a good standard, and you'll experience good ole Irish hospitality like you wouldn't believe. The best way to get inside the heart of Ireland, in my opinion.

I hope that helps....am happy to meet up before you go for a pint of the Black & White somewhere to chat further on this and catch up...we miss you from the Motley Crew for sure!!

If we don't catch up before you go, have a great trip...you're gonna love it for sure :-D

From a fellow It's-Time-For-Another-Return-To-The-Irish-Motherland-Magoo
One day, lad, all this will be yours....what, the curtains?

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Postby cbavasi » Sun, 22 Mar 2009 7:33 pm

Ozchick - What a treat to be going to Ireland! I think that is one of the favorite places I've ever been. We did the Dublin (to) Galway driving route. Like Dave Magoo said - definitely go to the B&Bs. We did that in every place we stopped and it was fantastic. I still giggle when I think of the first place we stayed and the innkeeper made us an amazing cooked breakfast and kept talking about the Irish sausage and how once you have an Irish sausage you'd never want another kind (to which I looked at my boyfriend - now husband - and started to laugh and say "well... I don't know, the English sausage is preeetttty good"... :lol: )
Cork & Kerry are amazing... and we also did a day trip to the Aran Islands and absolutely breathtaking. Have a WONDERFUL time... I'm jealous!

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Postby ozchick » Mon, 23 Mar 2009 8:37 pm

Hey thanks Magoo and CB. Gonna print out this thread. Too late for the 5 star accom I'm afraid. Got 1 night of that but THEN will look for B and B's and I've been told by family too that this is a good way to go. May join Motley manana not sure yet....
Oz
'Are you trying to tempt me because I come from the land of plenty?'


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