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Gymrats - Sharing Tips/information

Discuss about beauty & health. Need some advice or looking for a particular product? Share your beauty and health tips here.

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Postby Addadude » Wed, 01 Apr 2009 2:04 pm

aadvark wrote:can i post a qtn regarding building pecs? it's been a problem area of mine, i can't seem to bulk it up. used to go to the gym with a buddy, and while we did the same exercises (bench press, flyes... roughly same reps, same weight, we were roughly same size as well), his chest bulked up way faster than mine. i blamed it on my lousy genetics, but i am reluctant to let that bog me down after so many yrs, any suggestions?


There are lot of factors that come into play when one appears to have bodyparts that don't seem to respond to exercise. Genetics is obviously one. Mind/muscle connection is another. Simply the fact that some people are hard gainers and progress slowly is yet another. But one very important aspect is body mechanics.

Quite simply, your body's individual mechanics may make it such that bench pressing doesn't actually work your pecs. Instead your frontal delts and tris are getting all the work.

I have found that just doing incline bench pressing and weighted dips is enough for all over pec development. But that's just me. You may have to experiment with flat dumbell presses, cable cross over etc.

As a general rule, pressing exercises are better for pec size than more isolation exercises like flies and cross overs.

In fact, if I were you I would drop bench presses. They will eventually mess up your rotator cuffs (especially when you get strong on them) and they don't seem to work for you. In addition, flat benching emphasises lower pec development which can lead to the saggy tits syndrome that KSL describes. Also, the bench press is probably responsible for more torn pecs than any other exercise out there.

Incline presses, whether dumbell or barbell, create a much more sculpted look to your chest by building the upper portion of your chest. And they don't murder your rotator cuffs either.

Dips - particlarly weighted dips - are an excellent all round chest builder and are fairly safe to do.
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Postby BodyBlitz » Wed, 01 Apr 2009 4:06 pm

I think the safe thing to say is that - building a physique takes time effort and alot of dedication.

Muscles gains/fat loss/strength & conditioning are not linear, its build over a period of time with hard work - however understanding your body is key to unravel the mysteries and it takes time and effort and continual dedication to learn.

If you're impatient and want results now without even paying your dues, then don't waste your time.

Whats important is not to believe the hype and cut thru the BS put out there by magazines and popular internet sites, i recommend you go through Lyle's work and invest in his books.

http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/articles

He is someone that i go to for nutritional advice and set my bearings straight as he gives practical no-nonsense, straight to the point answers with real world experience and scientific facts to back up his findings.
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Postby ksl » Wed, 01 Apr 2009 11:20 pm

I agree with what addadude says, body mechanics and genetics play the major role, and i believe Lyle confirms this, by not committing himself to any other ideas, when he states all individuals are different.

The machines in gyms are almost standard run of the mill, with various adjustments to maximise the commercial value of the machines and do not suit everyone.

Own body weight is enough and the old fashioned push and pull isometrics and the opposite will do the trick, you don't need a machine. Just general push ups, chin ups, dips and gymnastic methods is best, there was a time when 20 chin ups, with a weight around the waist was another goal, it only takes training and anyone can do it, if they have the will. Although 3 or 4 weeks of missed training and you are back down to the start position, that's how easy one's strength decreases, lots of swinging and hanging on the bar, will give enormous arms, wrists and biceps like myself and any other well adapted gorilla in the jungle ha! Crikey my brother in law in UK is 195cm and i have bigger wrist than him and neck the same size.

I would much prefer to be medium sized, than xxl and the problem is,when training you never really think you are big, until people actually say it, and that isn't often.

Perception of oneself in the mirror is rather difficult to figure, so you have to get a guy the same size and weight to give you a better perception of yourself. Many do not consider that.

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Postby BodyBlitz » Thu, 02 Apr 2009 1:03 am

It depends on who you hang out with lol
I know some of the strong man competitors in SG, most of them are 120-115kg.

At 83kg, i'm puny compared to the them in size and strength.
Then you have the bodybuilders who are ridiculously massive for their weight.

End of the day, it depends on whether you want to choose function or form.
Although i do know a local olympic weighlifter who have massive quads from the sport.
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Postby aadvark » Thu, 02 Apr 2009 2:22 am

thanks for all the tips...i def have a lot of body fat, cos if i pinch my belly, i can def grab quite a roll of it. past few years i put on quite a bit of weight, last yr during this time of yr i was still 85kg, managed to shed abt 11kg after watching my diet and exercising more (nope, did not resort to lipo for my body :P )

from what i gather, i shld get my body fat down some more with cardio, in the meantime, complement it with dips and push-ups, and when i reach a more ideal body fat percentage, i can try to bulk up my chest with incline presses
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Postby BodyBlitz » Thu, 02 Apr 2009 12:13 pm

Yes that is correct but cardio alone do not cause a metabolic disturbance
You need to use other methods to accelerate it.

you can try HIIT - high intensity interval training and mix it up with Low impact steady state cardio
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Postby ksl » Thu, 02 Apr 2009 1:53 pm

aadvark wrote:thanks for all the tips...i def have a lot of body fat, cos if i pinch my belly, i can def grab quite a roll of it. past few years i put on quite a bit of weight, last yr during this time of yr i was still 85kg, managed to shed abt 11kg after watching my diet and exercising more (nope, did not resort to lipo for my body :P )

from what i gather, i shld get my body fat down some more with cardio, in the meantime, complement it with dips and push-ups, and when i reach a more ideal body fat percentage, i can try to bulk up my chest with incline presses


Like i said before you have no need to worry about the fat you have, the important, thing is to train all the muscle groups, and reduce fat intake to around 15 to 20%, the carbs you will need for training, and the protein for repair of muscle tissue, the whole complex synthesis will use a percentage of fat from your fat depot, but you must not cut fat out of your diet, only reduce it....the problem is if you cannot get that burn, the foods protein and carbs you are eating will go to the fat depot, its all about the actual effort, hard work, you put in, and a quick 10 minutes here and there, will not do it.

So focus on a planned training session, of 3 sets and increase to 5 sets, of light weights for rapid carb exhaustion, or slow heavy weight for muscle build. You can exhaust all daily carb intake within 30 minutes on the tread mill, by doing sprints, then it starts to take from the fat depot.

Dips you can do now, and should do now also incline press, but for stoking the fire, and burning calories do squats, but always wear a belt, for safety, don't ever believe that a slipped disc will not happen, because you don't lift heavy weight, it is nothing to do with weight so much, but the angle of lift.

understanding how to call on, the different energies of the body is important.....think about it, in terms of emergencies, the fuel is supplied from the carbs, this s what sprinters rely on for the sprint, it is short lived, with about 30 minutes use, available at one time, this is why a runner needs to plan his pace, and not be pressurised into increasing the pace, because someone overtakes.

To run dry of carbs, will cause muscles to fail and cramp, using slow movement exercise, uses only a portion of carbs, and more from the fat depot, if there is no fat in the depot, it will take the energy it needs from the muscle, so you need to ensure, you have enough protein and carbs, to do the work of muscle building, which is a slow and deliberate exercise, focussing on the muscles being trained, and doing a full flex. Half flex is no good at all, and you see many doing chin ups, with half flex, which is cheating oneself, of full muscle extension, because it is a very difficult exercise to pull up your own body weight.

Think of it this way, you are well on the road, to losing what fat you have, only think of the quality of your weight exercises to build more muscle, and ensure you have enough protein to do it, the fat you have is needed in the fuel mix otherwise, the muscle will get smaller, so its finding the balance of your diet, to suit your work out needs, you will have to experiment because of the body mechanics.

If you feel fatigued after a work out, it's because the fuel mix is not right, you should feel a buzz after a good hard work out....and there is only one reason why one should feel fatigued, probably not getting the 8 essential amino acids when you need them most....the body cannot make these 8 amino acids....so drink specially brewed vinegar while training made from brown rice, which produces the 8 essential protein amino acids in liquid form, refreshing , rejuvenating and fulfilling the metabolic cycle requirements of fuel optimisation, one citric acid cycle is equal to one ATP production...but what is the quality of fuel like, without the amino acid? think about it, and you will realise that the metabolism is impaired, when it needs to functioning at its best while exercising.

I proved this to myself, although it may be different for other individuals, but with over 25 years of running experience, I knew exactly how much weight i could lose on a run, and it wasn't more than half kilo a week, so it came as a shock, when i dropped 1kg in the first week of drinking vinegar, while training...the only logical explanation was that my diet, didn't cover the 8 essential amino acids, when i needed them most, so i continued to drink while running and weight training too, and it doubled the burning capability of the calories, on a more closer inspection of the metabolic cycle on wikipedia, I could see, that other supplements were not needed provided i got the 8 essential protein amino acids which act as intermediaries to ensure the correct fuel mixture, for high quality energy. without them, fatigue sets in.

So stamina, and endurance all require high grade fuel for synthesis of proteins and muscle building, also the carb energy fuel needs to be the best, for the sprint, no good with 2 star fuel when you need 4 star, right, so the importance must be on the fuel mixture, and without suffiecient aminos to mix with the foods, only a poor quality fuel will be delivered. Although you have no need to run out and get pulled into all the hype of food supplements at a 100$ a throw, when beverages cost $1.30 a bottle and provide more benefits than just a pill, like quenching your thirst as well as providing the amino acids.

Be careful when purchasing vinegars for drinking i have seen fruit stalls cheating customers, by selling vinegar drinks, mixed with fruit, and shaking the rice vinegar into the fruit.

These drinks are full of addtives, and the fruit is enhanced with syrup, and the vinegar is just white rice vinegar with no health benefits at all.

Heinz for example tout their vinegars on their website as healthy, but a distilled vinegar is not healthy, it is synthetic made of distilled water and acetic acid, used on salads and for industrial cleaning, no health benefits at all. They also state on their website to avoid cheaper vinegars, because they are probably made from benzene, :shock:

So the quality of vinegars out there in the market place, leave a lot to be desired.

A rule of thumb is to know that 3 types of vinegar exsist, specially brewed vinegar, synthetic vinegar, and the mixture of 1. and 2.

Obviously the 1st one specially brewed vinegars are the highest qualities and only fall into the functional category, if they have been tested, by an independant reputable bio-chemist in the food & beverage industry, to qualify for listing cardiovascular health.

One should always request the proof, and not be fooled into a purchase, because like heinze, they sell vinegar, but not health vinegar. I recieve many bodybuiling websites, asking me to exchange links, because they know the truth of vinegar drinking beverages now, of course the gyms are not keen to take it in, because there is more profit margins on the pills, it's all about money in the commercial market and not so much of health.

A very good diet, will ensure you get the amino acids anyway, but again not when you need them most, and that is when you are training and conditioning, the amounts required increase with body needs. So drinking vinegars are relatively cheap and healthy when compared to sodium benzoate drinks.

I have seen a couple of vinegar drinks in the supermarkets, which also tastes pretty good, there is one from the mainland, that should be avoided because of the aspatame, and other additives which can cause allergic reaction, it doesn't taste very nice either.

As the vinegar drinks become more popular, education in vinegars is required, because Singapore is a pirates paradise, more could be done, to protect the consumers.

Last of all drinking vinegars do not show significant weight loss after 6 months drinking without stimulating the metabolism, which means increasing the heart beat as often as possible.

The metabolic process must be started to lose weight, or eat less.

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Postby BodyBlitz » Fri, 03 Apr 2009 12:31 am

I call BS on your vinegar :P
Feel free to refute me with reason of real world results of people you've trained and diet principles you adhere to that is grounded in science.

I've gotten to where i am without vinegar - keep carbs below 100 grams and still be able to do 400m intervals, managed to do 1 bodyweight(82.5kg) clean and jerk and squat 85kg while on a caloric deficit diet.

PS: you don't need a belt, i do 120kg Deadlifts for reps without one, been training for almost 3 years seriously and never used a belt.
My client who is 47 do 60kg deadlift and injury free - will post a video of her soon.

All you need to know is that the your inner core musculature - transverse abominus/internal obliques can be used as a belt.
If you're interested in knowing more, read paul chek's earlier work in scientific back training.
*please start keep your pseudo science to your thread and stop recommending people things that are hogwash with anecdotal opinions =)
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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Fri, 03 Apr 2009 10:31 am

BodyBlitz wrote:I call BS on your vinegar :P
Feel free to refute me with reason of real world results of people you've trained and diet principles you adhere to that is grounded in science.

I've gotten to where i am without vinegar - keep carbs below 100 grams and still be able to do 400m intervals, managed to do 1 bodyweight(82.5kg) clean and jerk and squat 85kg while on a caloric deficit diet.

PS: you don't need a belt, i do 120kg Deadlifts for reps without one, been training for almost 3 years seriously and never used a belt.
My client who is 47 do 60kg deadlift and injury free - will post a video of her soon.

All you need to know is that the your inner core musculature - transverse abominus/internal obliques can be used as a belt.
If you're interested in knowing more, read paul chek's earlier work in scientific back training.
*please start keep your pseudo science to your thread and stop recommending people things that are hogwash with anecdotal opinions =)


You just lost any credibility you might have had with that rather, for lack of a better word, stupid sentence. The fact that you don't use one doesn't mean you shouldn't use one. That's like saying just because wearing a crash helmet won't prevent all head injuries, you shouldn't wear one! I'd say you are very irresponsible and I sure wouldn't recommend you to anybody as I consider you unsafe at any speed. You are an accident waiting to happen. Sorry.

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Postby ksl » Fri, 03 Apr 2009 11:53 am

BodyBlitz wrote:
sundaymorningstaple wrote:
BodyBlitz wrote:
For me, i'm gunning for 10% BF as a fitness goal this year thats why i'm hungry all the time. :???:


We touched on this a while back but there wasn't any further discussion on it. So I'll broach it again now. What are you measuring your BF% with? Are you using Accumeasure calipers or electrical induction via a body composition type electronic scales like Tanita Inner-scan monitors? Course you could be using hydrostatic weighing but I kinda doubt it.

I weigh myself at the same time every morning upon waking before breakfast or drinking any fluids. That way, I don't have to worry about the 4 hour fast from liquid or 12 hours after exercising.

I use a Tanita Inner-scan and my body fat has maintained at between 9.8 and 11.5% ever since finishing my diet last June. Granted Tanita monitors may have up to an 5% error margin when compared to DEXA but using it as a gauge it dropped from around 28% January 07 to this mornings 11.1% it's still a fair gauge of where I've come from as there is less than a 1% deviation as I use it exactly the same time & circumstances daily at 6:30 in the morning.

Independent research at several major universities (including Columbia University in New York City) has confirmed that in clinical settings, the Tanita Body Fat Monitor is accurate within +/- 5 percentage of the institutional standard of body composition analysis--Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA). It should be made clear that there is only one method of calculating body composition that is close to 100% accurate, and that is an autopsy. Tanita believes its method to be the most convenient and accessible to accurately predict body composition. The TBF Series results are repeatable to within +/- 1 percent variation when used under consistent conditions.


The best way to measure is actually MRI, after which underwater weighing then bodyfat caliper.

MRI is expensive but highly detailed and you can look into your visceral fat too.

Underwater is great but not many places have this testing, my friend who is a PE teacher said that NIE has this.
Underwater testing works as muscles is more dense than water, therefore the body fat will float.

I personally use bodyfat caliper and the mirror, simple and cheap tools.
If i have help then i'll do a 7 point test, on my own 3 point.
Then i'll compare it to the weight on the scale if there is muscles loss and the mirror to see if there is visible changes.

There was a study about the electrical impedance not being accurate due to many factors and variable -

Abstract

Percentage of body fat is strongly associated with the risk of several chronic diseases but its accurate measurement is difficult. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a relatively simple, quick and non-invasive technique, to measure body composition. It measures body fat accurately in controlled clinical conditions but its performance in the field is inconsistent. In large epidemiologic studies simpler surrogate techniques such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-hip ratio are frequently used instead of BIA to measure body fatness. We reviewed the rationale, theory, and technique of recently developed systems such as foot (or hand)-to-foot BIA measurement, and the elements that could influence its results in large epidemiologic studies. BIA results are influenced by factors such as the environment, ethnicity, phase of menstrual cycle, and underlying medical conditions. We concluded that BIA measurements validated for specific ethnic groups, populations and conditions can accurately measure body fat in those populations, but not others and suggest that for large epdiemiological studies with diverse populations BIA may not be the appropriate choice for body composition measurement unless specific calibration equations are developed for different groups participating in the study.

Summary of factors impacting BIA results

▪ Contact between limbs and trunk

▪ Inaccurate body weight

▪ Consumption of food and drink (overnight fast suggested)

▪ Moderate to intense level physical activity 2–3 hours before measurement

▪ Medical conditions impacting fluid and electrolyte balance

▪ Ambient temperature (cold increases impedance)

▪ Individual characteristics (abdominal obesity, muscle mass, weight loss, menstrual cycle, menopause)

▪ Ethnic variation, possibly mediated by body density and proportional limb length



Conclusion

BIA has become a popular method for estimation of body composition during the last two decades. Since 1990, more than 1600 published articles have been reported using BIA as a tool of body composition measurement [17,40,68] and our search with the key words of body composition and bioelectrical impedance showed that 235 articles were published in English between 2004 and 2006 and we found different levels of agreements between different BIA models and reference methods. Also, there are many different equations for BIA calibration thus results of studies should be compared with more caution. BIA seems to reasonably estimate body composition in controlled conditions for healthy and euvolemic adults by applying a population specific predictive equation and it is not recommended to generalize a few equations for international epidemiologic studies, which involve participants from diverse populations. As far as we know, for some ethnic groups such as South Asians or Middle Easterners, or African residing in Africa predictive equations have not yet been developed. Hence, it is necessary to develop new predictive equations or cross validate existing equations on new populations to be studied.


If the BIA equation is not appropriately chosen based on age, gender, level of physical activity, level of body fat and ethnicity, the results of the study will not be reliable.
Overall BIA is a useful tool for clinical studies, but for large epidemiological studies with diverse population, particularly in developing nations, BIA has limited use unless valuation studies are conducted specifically for the populations under study.


http://www.nutritionj.com/content/7/1/26


Like SMS says, all your credability has slipped away with a silly remark, that lacks commonsense :roll:

A coach with no safety procedures, is a dangerous person and you are just asking for trouble. The more weight you place on your spine, compresses the disc extremely tight together, in fact you do not even have to lift anything while bending and you can pop the disc, with more weight directly on the spine, the risks increase 10 fold.

It's only a matter of time when the weakest disc pops, mine crumbled up when i was 29, while working on a building site, the weight i had was no more than 25kg and we was 2 men carrying it, there was also no pain at all, that day, the next morning however i couldn't walk at all, it took 6 weeks off work, before i could walk and in the end I had to give up the work for 1 year, still it never healed up, and an operation was ruled out because of the danger of making me paralysed, I had to leave construction and retrain, it took over 20 years, before the 4th and 5th vertabraes welded together and the pain subsided, but I have today what is called a flat back, and have great difficulty bending foreword and backward bend is not possible at all, so be wise think about it.

I hope you learn something here, because you would be held liable has a coach, the first thing one must be 100% sure about as an instructor, is public safety, ignorance is no excuse.

It is true to say that all people in construction in Singapore have little or no idea of ergonomics....that is to say that everyone using a shovel, is probably lifting wrong, and placing undue force on the spinal coloumn, it's only in strong union Countries like Denmark, that learn such techniques, thanks to the unions, that care for their workers.

In fact ergonomics would be a very good eduction for anyone here in Singapore, because it also covers government employees, reduces sick days, and improves overall quality of work place, even sports and athletics.

The good news I had last week, is that my 34 year old daughter has been picked for the para olympic judo team for 2012 in London for the blind. She must now relocate for training to London, I'm so proud, but i new she had the will power, one tough cookie at 4ft 9 inch, and won by ippon which i think is the equivelent to a knockout out of her 65kg opponent.

I feel so proud, that i made the right choice when she was 7, to study self defence, because of the gang related environment we grew up in and to keep her on the right path, it is now paying off, although sport fighting has been passed down from my father, who trained boxers and wrestlers from the 30's until the 80's for the community, obviously his passion.

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Postby BodyBlitz » Fri, 03 Apr 2009 3:22 pm

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_art ... r_both&cr=

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_art ... part_1&cr=

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_art ... part_2&cr=

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_art ... part_3&cr=

read and learn.
You guys are behind times already, and this has been out for a very long time.
Paul Chek's Scientific back study was a gem in his prime, Mcgill and hodges picked up and expanded on it.

Just because you did it that way doesn't mean it meant to be done that way.
Much like having old practices you didn't really understand, but yet do it because you didn't know any better.

Think about it, if you did go to the gym to improve your everyday life and train for function.. then what practical function is there for a belt? Do you carry your belt everywhere you go and before you lift something off the ground, dawn your belt?

If you're competing sure, but in everyday life? seriously?!

I can show you real world results, what have you guys to say about all your "safe" practices? Man i like to stir the pot. :P
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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Fri, 03 Apr 2009 5:43 pm

You are not stirring the pot. You are just making you self look sillier and sillier. I just hope you don't end in a lawsuit for giving out bad advice that borders on criminal. If you get sued, it would actually serve you right.

Without going into a whole lot of detail and just a cursory of the first link only, you come across this statement:

"This is unless, of course, the lifter is wearing a weight belt. As I've discussed in previous articles, belt wearing may completely alter the recruitment patterns of the core musculature, which may provide gross stability for the torso, but no additional stability for the spine!"


The operative word here is "May" which means possibly yes and possibly no. Not an affirmative in either case. Therefore, why would you throw away a saftety measure when a guy/girl is only training and not a professional but listening to someone who "supposedly is". BZZZZZZZ you lose.

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Postby Addadude » Fri, 03 Apr 2009 6:48 pm

BB, I must admit that I find it very funny that younger people involved in almost every endeavour like to proclaim that 'the older guys are behind the times'. But, very often their 'prooof' of this is simply a regurgitation of a topic that the 'older guys' have come across time and time again.

It happens all the time in my business (advertising) and I usually laugh, because these young guys sound just like I did 20 years ago - and I sound like those 'older guys' who use to so annoy me with their 'been there, done that' attitude.

But the fact is, we have indeed 'been there and done that'.

In the local BB forums here, young guys love to cite stuff from T-Nation as though it is some kind of gospel truth. But the funny thing is, a LOT of the stuff on T-Nation is anything but new. It is often at best a reinterpretation of an idea that is in fact decades old.

Case in point - the pros and cons of using a lifting belt. In the first gym I trained in (far too long a go in a country far, far away), it was seriously frowned upon - for exactly the same reasons that you mentioned. I subsequently moved to a very hardcore Olympic weightlifting and powerlifting gym where just about everyone used a belt for heavy squats, deadlifts and rows. There were a few guys who were vehemently against this practice and there were a lot of, uh, 'debates'... Now we are talking about something I saw happening in gyms more than 25 years ago... And I'm sure that argument is much older than that!

In my own experience, I've found that using a belt for deadlifting is not really all that useful. I'll happily do a set of 10 reps with 110kg without one but I keep the exercise very, very strict. At most the belt will act as a reminder for me to keep my torso 'tight'.

When it comes to squats, rows or standing overhead presses however, I find it essential when the weights start to get heavy.

These days I mostly use my belt as a kind of harness (with a chain) to add weight for weighted dips and pull ups - hardly the use it was inteneded for!
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Postby ksl » Fri, 03 Apr 2009 9:58 pm

Sigh! :roll: Just like my son! Always do the opposite, thinking he can wind people up and that he knows best! :roll: How childish and immature is that :roll: he's also finding out the hard way! The belt is a support to be used, until one learns the correct lifting stance, you should know better than to make a silly statement, when you are a trainer!

The wooden spoon cannot cut it! It's all back in your face real time, no matter how many links you post. It's nothing to do with us old fogeys :lol: it's just plain old commonsense which you lack :) no hard feelings though, i just wouldn't like you to get taken to court over it! :wink:

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Postby BodyBlitz » Sun, 05 Apr 2009 3:41 am

addadude

Not really, i don't regard T-nation as gospel truth.
I've studied Paul Chek's Scientific back training and have understood the mechanics of the inner core mechanics.

Much of it has evolved and Dr. Stuart Mcgill's stuff has expanded on that knowledge and came up with the bracing technique which alot of O'lifters have used - which incorporate the Valsa technique.

If you're interested buy it from Amazon.

If you want to remind yourself to keep your torso tight you can do these few things prior to the lifts -

- Activation of your TVA - Ab wheels and side bridges
- Activation of your posterior chain - I usually find doing lat pull downs targeting your lower traps to get them firing provide very useful feedback signals to your nervous system when your thoracic is rounding as you know there and then tension is lost to maintain integrity for the neutral arc.
- Using the valsa technique.

Unless you're having a competition which tend to have more intensity/intensiveness/psychological pressure to perform, i don't see any use for a belt because it only makes you train lazily.

Lastly if lifts do fail and they do sometimes, you can sense it half way through the lift by then you should call it off as a technical failure and either call it, stop take a breather and continue.

Quality of movement and lifts should never be compromise and safety will be priority if you were to schedule your lifts properly.

Been there and done that is not something i'm looking into if its not practical and applicable to daily life.

Sure it'll work, tell me why it works and how practical is it for people who aren't competitive OL'ers or PL'ers or Strongman.


SMS,

I can give you book recommendation and courses you can go to but will you buy it or go for it?

If yes, pm me and i'll tell you the titles - if no then our discussion ends here because i cannot possibly summarize all the information and years of lifting experience for you to understand it.

Even after absorbing the information, it'll take at least 6 months to really understand through constant practice and the entire functional anatomy of how you can go about apply it and designing progressions.

Ksl,

I could say alot of things but i'll follow churchill on this -
"Never argue with an idiot someone watching might not be able to tell the difference."

so i'll agree with everything you say - belts are good, drinking vinegar bought from you is even better, don't need to do anything and you'll be the next arnie or ronnie :P

What else do you need me to agree or make a plug about?
http://bodyblitz.sg - A new era of fitness.


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