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How to terminate the contract during probation?

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cherrykingxu
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How to terminate the contract during probation?

Postby cherrykingxu » Mon, 13 Oct 2008 10:12 am

My probation is 3 months,if i quit the job, when should I leave the company? should I still work one week or one month after i send the resign letter?

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Postby QRM » Mon, 13 Oct 2008 10:30 am

What does it say in the probation letter?

In some cases if you work in a highly sensitive environment they would ask you to leave straight away.

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Postby sofiaj » Sun, 19 Oct 2008 7:31 pm

QRM wrote:What does it say in the probation letter?

In some cases if you work in a highly sensitive environment they would ask you to leave straight away.


is resignation during probation frowned upon by most companies here in singapore? will it make applying for another job difficult?

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 20 Oct 2008 12:06 am

Not really. Often times it was a bad fit both for you and for the company. They would rather have a happy trooper than someone who was unhappy so it better for you to leave early rather than waiting on them to invest training dollars on your and then leaving them after they have possibly made a large investment in you.

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Postby sherrielynn » Wed, 22 Oct 2008 9:11 am

It depends with your company.
See how long it needs for you to stay in the company.

But lets say you actually found another job which is able to wait for you to serve finish your notice, then it isn't a problem. But if you have yet to find for a job, why not take a break and choose what you really want ? I mean since within 3 months you are already thinking of leaving that job, it means either you can't take the work stress there or it isn't your ideal job.
So why not take a break to think what you really wish to do before applying ?
That break need not be long. Like me, i took a 2weeks break to sort of my thoughts. :)

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 22 Oct 2008 1:29 pm

Not really good advice at all. Actually it's rotten advice. Especially considering that everything may dry up while she is relaking! Recessions tend to have that ability. Quite often when I see CV's that tell me that the candidate "took a break" after working for a year or two, I just file the CV in the circular file. As an HR manager, I don't need to inteview people who will burn out in 12 to 24 months.

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Postby saint73 » Thu, 23 Oct 2008 4:22 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:Not really good advice at all. Actually it's rotten advice. Especially considering that everything may dry up while she is relaking! Recessions tend to have that ability. Quite often when I see CV's that tell me that the candidate "took a break" after working for a year or two, I just file the CV in the circular file. As an HR manager, I don't need to inteview people who will burn out in 12 to 24 months.


:cry: They are pple have their family problem to settle as they need to take a year or two....after they solve their problem want to find jobs again...Juz thk if one day u got family problem as can't go out to work ...dnt you think u not even give people chances to work again...


A good Hr manager should scan through the cv if candidate have the ability for the jobs, not just see they take so long leave as without know the reason you condemn them... :shooting:

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 23 Oct 2008 9:36 pm

When you have seen as many CV's as I have, and come across silly reasons for leaving jobs like "change of atmosphere", "change of environment", "left to find a better position", and all after only 1 or 2 years, it tells me that the person is not stable. Usually if they take a break due to family problems or health problems or educational breaks, they make a point of telling you. So, I stand by my remarks. The person who leave for a better position or more pay and is out of work for a month or two, tells me that the person not someone I want in my company. Who in their right mind quits a job "before" finding another position? Or they state on their CV's that they left for a better position or money and the next job is exactly the same kind of job for the same kind of money. Think about it.........

sms

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Postby jesse.armand » Tue, 18 Nov 2008 10:18 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:When you have seen as many CV's as I have, and come across silly reasons for leaving jobs like "change of atmosphere", "change of environment", "left to find a better position", and all after only 1 or 2 years, it tells me that the person is not stable. Usually if they take a break due to family problems or health problems or educational breaks, they make a point of telling you. So, I stand by my remarks. The person who leave for a better position or more pay and is out of work for a month or two, tells me that the person not someone I want in my company. Who in their right mind quits a job "before" finding another position? Or they state on their CV's that they left for a better position or money and the next job is exactly the same kind of job for the same kind of money. Think about it.........

sms


What kind of CVs / Resumes / Applicants have you reviewed ?

Did you consider that you can't really understand some companies, before you work there for at least 3 months ?
And some people just took jobs offered in front of their face, because they don't want to be unemployed (for people who got an offer, instead of applying).

That's why there is a probation period :), it's not just for the company, it's also for the employee :).

It will depends on the company actually, in my field, 2 years is a long period, and if the company is small, the boss is not creative or rich enough, most of these employees will find another job, or start their own business, if they're capable of that.

To be a good boss, it's not just about how to bend employees to your will, but how to make them like, respect, and love you very much :).

Sun Tzu said to treat your soldiers as your children, and they will die defending you :)

To the original poster, if after your resignation, you see a better offer, then just take it. But, it's better for you to finish your responsibilities in your previous company.

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Postby CSG » Wed, 19 Nov 2008 12:48 am

Partially agree with SMS, gaps in employment are never good unless you had some kind of emergency. That being said, i know plenty of ppl in banking and finance in general who switch jobs every 2-3 yrs. It really depends on the industry.

Also, if someone really hates their job; I would value them having the balls to quit more than if they just sat there contemplating and worrying what would happen. Of course back in the day it was easier to find jobs. Now who knows how long someone will be unemployed for.


to the original poster - you never mentioned why you want to leave

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 19 Nov 2008 10:42 am

jesse.armand wrote:
What kind of CVs / Resumes / Applicants have you reviewed ?

Did you consider that you can't really understand some companies, before you work there for at least 3 months ?
And some people just took jobs offered in front of their face, because they don't want to be unemployed (for people who got an offer, instead of applying).

That's why there is a probation period :), it's not just for the company, it's also for the employee :).

It will depends on the company actually, in my field, 2 years is a long period, and if the company is small, the boss is not creative or rich enough, most of these employees will find another job, or start their own business, if they're capable of that.

To be a good boss, it's not just about how to bend employees to your will, but how to make them like, respect, and love you very much :).

Sun Tzu said to treat your soldiers as your children, and they will die defending you :)

To the original poster, if after your resignation, you see a better offer, then just take it. But, it's better for you to finish your responsibilities in your previous company.


Jesse,

With all due respect, as a HeadHunter with 14 years of experience (not a body shop although I also did a couple of years there as well - All in SE Asia) and over 40 years in the workforce worldwide AND currently the HR & Finance Manager of a medium sized SME of over 200 staff I think I may well equipped to understand and know what I'm talking about. I've recruited from the lowest levels of worker (in my current company) to the highest levels in various industries. However, I do not venture into the IT or Financial industries as I prefer to stay in industries that I personally have my own established networks in. Having said that, it doesn't matter what industry, your CV and your actual track record must jive. Don't tell me you left for better opportunity, better pay, when in reality you were fired, let go, retrenched, laid off, or you contract was just not renewed. I know the difference between a Project Engineer who works projects all over the world and a working stiff who goes to Shenton Way every morning. I've met them all. And placed heaps of both.

Probation periods are find and you are right, they are for both. But again, the old saying always rings true. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. You shouldn't voluntarily quit any job before having another to step into. Especially in today's market where it's a buyer's market and not a seller's market.

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Postby jesse.armand » Wed, 19 Nov 2008 10:10 pm

SundayMorningStaples,

I never meant to underestimate your experiences, I'm just asking what are your experiences ? So I could understand how you came to that kind of opinion.

Yes, it's right that any industry would require a well polished CV, period of unemployment sure does will raise some questions to the recruiter.

All I'm saying is in the IT field, there are lots of turnovers, that's it :).

Mostly, this is caused by the boss who underestimate their work, or just because of confrontations over which technology to use, different conceptual understanding.

This is what I observe, most of the good IT guys (developers or other type of engineers) are honest, straightforward, and smart, and they'll know when the company is going in the wrong direction, but since they're just "IT guys" very few people are willing to understand their opinions.

You can meet lots of engineers with great degree and expertise, so they are smart in their field, but their boss probably are not, or at least they are not following the latest trends. Not all managers has a background in IT or still keeping up with the latest trends.

When those managers aren't willing to let their engineers decide on which technology is best (by cost or quality), now that will start the dissatisfaction, arguments, and turnovers.

Well there are some guys who just care about the money, and don't care of their responsibilities. But, there also lots of those who had done their best but keep on jealous on better treatment of their friends in other companies.


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