fogging against Dengue mosquitoes

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cirkus
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fogging against Dengue mosquitoes

Post by cirkus » Thu, 09 Oct 2008 9:16 am

Dear all,
I learned that here is a great deal of "fogging" at our and other condos here in Singapore. First we thought it is being done every once in a while, but now I found out they do it every week (at times when most people are at work). On a recent occasion, the fogging was very heavy, so that our fish in the aquarium on the balcony on the 6th floor keeled over!!!
What is this fogging stuff? I know it's against the mosquitoes, but the entire ground must be totally contaminated with that stuff. Is it safe to let children play outside on the lawns???
It seems to me that Dengue is a short term problem, but when people get sick in 20 years, no one will know it was the fogging...

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taxico
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Post by taxico » Sat, 11 Oct 2008 7:52 am

you should reduce contact with freshly dispersed chemicals although they are approved by the WHO.

i think there should not be too much chemicals stuck to grass because they don't fog lawns (as i understand it), but drains, nooks and crannies that breed mosquitoes.

as the chemicals break-down over time, letting them play at opened well-vented areas (but not immediately after fogging) should be fine.

close all doors and windows on fogging days; your condo ought to be able to advise you on which days fogging gets carried out or you can call up the company.

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Post by cirkus » Tue, 14 Oct 2008 5:33 pm

approved by the WHO-- that sounds disturbing... definetely not specific to invertebrates, as our ornamental fish have experienced... any long term studies available?? Every chemical breaks down eventually ;) Let's hope the chemicals know that and stay in the nooks and drains.

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Post by durain » Tue, 14 Oct 2008 6:47 pm

either fogging or get dengue! fogging been in use for years to control mosquitoes.

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Post by batgirl_cdn » Tue, 14 Oct 2008 7:07 pm

They fog the snot out of our condo every two weeks. Our laundry balcony backs onto the parking garage where tons of fogging is done because of the garbage shutes. The fog saturates the laundry balcony area where many people have their maids living! Smoke drifts freely into the kitchen. I've been home a couple of times and even with all windows closed it comes into all the rooms in the house.

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Post by cirkus » Fri, 17 Oct 2008 9:38 am

durain wrote:either fogging or get dengue! fogging been in use for years to control mosquitoes.
Yeah, or: either dengue or get cancer in 20 years??? Or have your babies malformed?? No one will be able to tell why you got that liver tumor- ever wondered why there are so many malformed and disfigured people, i.e. with extra fingers etc in Singapore???????????

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Post by durain » Fri, 17 Oct 2008 4:55 pm

true, but fogging not proven yet. so you can still have a good 20 years IF it does cause cancer. but as for dengue fever (DHF)... start writing your will.

having lived next to a jungle, dengue is a serious threat in tropical countries. you dont want to see a dengue victim. for now, fogging is the only way for a large area. it will kill airbource mosquitoes and also their eggs. there are others in the pipeline to control mosquitoes like zapping them using electric field after luring them with odour or co2. (dont ask, i dont know if the man-made odour is approved by WHO). the device is small-ish but needs a lot to cover an area.

i understand your concern. check with your property management when is their fogging schedule and take precaution to close all your doors and windows (and cover the fish tank). it is best not let the kids play outside until the fogging is cleared.

fogging is insecticide. if you really want to know more, you will have to ask what is the exact chemical they are using. there are different chemicals they can use for fogging. i think the property management is also protecting themselves. if any of the residents got bitten by an aedes mosquitoes, got dengue fever and die, it doesnt look good on them!

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Post by QRM » Fri, 17 Oct 2008 5:27 pm

cirkus wrote:[ever wondered why there are so many malformed and disfigured people, i.e. with extra fingers etc in Singapore???????????
Actually funny you should say that, I notice alot of them here too. Signs of inbreeding on a small island ?

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road.not.taken
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Post by road.not.taken » Fri, 17 Oct 2008 5:38 pm

I think because wherever most of us came from the extra digits were removed at birth. Lots of cultures consider it to be good luck.

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sierra2469alpha
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Post by sierra2469alpha » Fri, 17 Oct 2008 5:38 pm

...and it's not just dengue - try most forms of encephalitis. Mosquitoes are the primary carrier of all blood-carrier based diseases, vector-borne diseases, and are particularly virulent with all forms of flavovirus. To date, and someone might want to correct me, they mosquitoes carry up to 10,000 blood-borne virii (depending on the species of mosquito).

So, dengue, while nasty, isn't the only worry. If you want pictures of someone dying from encephalitis (Jap E. to be procise), let me know. It ain't pretty.

On the efficacy (i.e. the efficiency of spraying for mozzies) this link to the US CDC may be of interest:

http://www.cdc.gov/eid/content/14/5/747.htm

HTH, Mr. P

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taxico
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Post by taxico » Fri, 17 Oct 2008 6:38 pm

with all the processed foods we ingest and things that are not well made (eg, toys with lead from china), the chemicals used in thermal fogging machines should really be the last thing anyone should worry about.*

i've mentioned fish, right? and containers likes drink cans and tinned food?

the list goes on, if i haven't.

damned if they do, damned if they don't...

* = read my first reply for some basic precautions that should be taken.

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Post by kristyna » Sat, 18 Oct 2008 8:38 am

Yes, I could bring up my kids in the greenhouse but it won't be still enough prevention and protection for them...
Sometimes it pays off just to use common sense.
So I just close all windows when they do the fogging - thanks God, it is so noisy so I can hear it from a distance and get ready.
Maybe I should be more concerned, especially being a paediatrician myself. I suppose there must be tonnes of papers published on this fogging thing. Too busy or lazy to go through. :wink:

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Post by batgirl_cdn » Sat, 18 Oct 2008 9:20 am

My friend got Dengue while working in Thailand. She recovered well in hospital after a few days with high fever. Apparently 90% of infected people only get mild flu-like symptoms and don't even know they have it. It isn't a pleasant disease to have if you get a severe case, but it isn't an automatic death sentence. It drives me crazy when you have people scaremongering here. The death stats for Singapore Dengue cases in 2007 was 0.2% of the population who contracted the disease (8,826 cases).

Here are two articles with Dengue info.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/06/26/news/dengue.php
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008- ... 391146.htm

And WHO info on Dengue
http://www.who.int/topics/dengue/en/

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road.not.taken
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Post by road.not.taken » Sat, 18 Oct 2008 9:41 am

Yes, but it's bad for business and Singapore is all about business.

I lost 6 weeks in bed with Dengue, it may not be an automatic death sentence but it's not Paris in Springtime either.

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Post by sierra2469alpha » Sat, 18 Oct 2008 5:33 pm

R.N.T - nah, Paris in Springtime is dog poopies! Almost as dangerous! Ms. C and I had our honeymoon there, and I almost "came a cropper" more than a few times!

Bless, P

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