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Odd - 2-pin plug won't go in electrical outlet

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ferrisld
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Odd - 2-pin plug won't go in electrical outlet

Post by ferrisld » Wed, 20 Aug 2008 7:48 pm

Hi all,
Encountering something odd - I bought a battery recharger which had two pins (plug "B" about half-way down the screen at http://www.american-allergy-supply.com/ ... dn3000.htm) and tried to plug it into my electrical socket, which is more in line with plug "D", same link as above. It won't seem to go in. This is odd as I'm almost positive I've put "B" into "D" before here in Singapore. Also, as the link above suggests, both "B" and "D" are used in Singapore.

Anyone know what might be going on here? Having a battery recharger without electricity is a bit useless. ;)

Thanks!

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sundaymorningstaple
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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 20 Aug 2008 8:50 pm

Unfortunately you have a "C" Plug but of either the CEE 7/16 or the CEE 7/17 specifications - don't know which unless I were to measure the gap between pins.
Domestic AC power plugs and sockets: Encyclopedia - Domestic AC power plugs and sockets


Domestic AC power plugs and sockets - Type C European 2-pin
CEE 7/16 (Europlug)

This two-wire plug is unearthed and has two round, 4 mm pins, which usually converge slightly. It is popularly known as the Europlug and is described in CEE 7/16. This is probably the single most widely used international plug. It will mate with any socket that accepts 4.0 mm round contacts spaced 19 mm apart. It is commonly used in all countries of Europe except the UK, Ireland, and (former) UK dependencies such as Malta. It is also used in various parts of the developing world such as India. This plug is generally limited for use in class II applications that require 2.5 A or less. Because it can be inserted in either direction into the socket, it is symmetrical (that is, live and neutral are connected at random). This plug is also defined in Italian standard CEI 23-5.
CEE 7/17

This peculiar symmetrical plug might easily be categorised under E or F. It has two pins like 7/16 does, but they are 4.8 mm in diameter like types E and F, and also a round, plastic or rubber base that stops the plug being inserted into small sockets that 7/16 can fit into. Instead, only large round sockets such as those intended for types E and F can take it. The base has holes in it to accommodate both side contacts and socket earth pins. Class II applications. Also defined in CEI 23-5.
BS 4573

In the United Kingdom and Ireland, there is a special version of the type C plug for use with shavers (electric razors) in bath or shower rooms. It has 5 mm diameter pins 16.6 mm apart, and the sockets for this plug can often take CEE 7/16, US and/or Australian plugs. They are also often capable of supplying either 230 V or 115 V. In wet zones, they must contain an isolating transformer compliant with BS 3535.
Sockets

Some Type C sockets can only take 4 mm pins or have plastic barriers in place to prevent Schuko or French plugs entering however many can take 4.8 mm pins and have plenty of room for a 4.8 mm pin round Schuko or French plug to be inserted

ferrisld
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Post by ferrisld » Wed, 20 Aug 2008 9:08 pm

Well that's bollocks - I thought Best Denki wouldn't sell me something that I couldn't use in Singapore as they are a "big chain" but I guess I was wrong! That being said, your message was quite helpful as it a) helped me identify it as CEE 7/17 (based on the description of the plastic base of the plug) and b) inspired me to try to put it into the hairdryer outlet (my hairdryer has outlets for different plugs, compared to my regular wall outlets) in my bathroom - and it fits perfectly in there. :) So, problem solved! Thanks!

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micknlea
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Post by micknlea » Wed, 20 Aug 2008 9:46 pm

So it doesn't fit with one of those little plastic adaptors with the plastic earth point? You know the ones I mean, cost about $1.50 in supermarket? I wish I could find a pic but I can't. :? I use these on all my two pin plugs as it enables the point to work without having the earthing plug.
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sundaymorningstaple
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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 20 Aug 2008 11:17 pm

You are just lucky that all your plugs are CEE 7/16's. You do find both over here due to the fact that soooo much stuff is imported and I usually just cut off the plug and put on a large 3-pin plug on it. That way there's no need for adapters at all. When I take something that has been converted to local 3-pin I take a multi-adapter (like the one in my computer bag which will I think handle darn near everything) That way for a $1.50 (cost of a 3-pin plug) it will fit any normal socket here in Singers. It doesn't need a ground wire and it doesn't matter which wire is connected to which pin (as long as it's not the ground wire pin - the big pin).

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