Singapore Expats Forum

Shock!

Discuss about the latest news & interesting topics, real life experience or other out of topic discussions with locals & expatriates in Singapore.

earthfriendly
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1827
Joined: Sat, 20 Aug 2005

Postby earthfriendly » Fri, 08 Aug 2008 3:39 am

I am not trying to sound callous here. My experience has only been with chicken. And the costco ones, which can weigh twice as heavy as other supermarket. I find that the implements can make a big difference. My Wustof classic knives (I don't care about the grand prix line) cuts better than the other lesser knives.

Which brings on the next question. Could it be premeditated? One needs to be prepared and gather all the right tools for the act.


Butcher for what kind of meat? I would imagine it is much easier to cut up a smaller and more slender body mass, as opposed to a cow.

Plavt
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 4289
Joined: Wed, 18 May 2005
Location: United Kingdom

Postby Plavt » Fri, 08 Aug 2008 4:04 am

earthfriendly wrote:
Which brings on the next question. Could it be premeditated? One needs to be prepared and gather all the right tools for the act.


Could be and tools could have been gathered but as I was saying carving up a human being is no easy task, not even for a pathologist who requires a plethora of tools.


Butcher for what kind of meat? I would imagine it is much easier to cut up a smaller and more slender body mass, as opposed to a cow.


:lol:
I was thinking more in terms of the large carcasses one sees or more commonly used to see in the local butcher's shops.

You seem to have a good knowledge of knives, hope hubby doesn't get on your bad side. :P :P

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34258
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Fri, 08 Aug 2008 9:41 am

My black steel, Vietnam Era, K-Bar Military Issue Survival knife can be sharpened to a level you can shave with. Holds an edge extremely well! Enough so, that a number of soldiers were killed while using this in close-in combat because the knife was not modified to have a ragged edge blade. This led to the problem of sneaking up on an enemy and cutting his throat and the guy turning around in that split second and shooting the attacker because the slice was painless initially (Just like a paper cut). Anyway, I've used this knife for 40 years now while deer hunting and it will hold an edge enough to go through hide, fur, bone when gutting deer in the field. These knives can be purchased in most Military Surplus Stores and with a 7" blade is long enough, sharp enough and heavy enough to do the job relatively easy. :o

Plavt
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 4289
Joined: Wed, 18 May 2005
Location: United Kingdom

Postby Plavt » Fri, 08 Aug 2008 2:49 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:My black steel, Vietnam Era, K-Bar Military Issue Survival knife can be sharpened to a level you can shave with. Holds an edge extremely well! Enough so, that a number of soldiers were killed while using this in close-in combat because the knife was not modified to have a ragged edge blade. This led to the problem of sneaking up on an enemy and cutting his throat and the guy turning around in that split second and shooting the attacker because the slice was painless initially (Just like a paper cut). Anyway, I've used this knife for 40 years now while deer hunting and it will hold an edge enough to go through hide, fur, bone when gutting deer in the field. These knives can be purchased in most Military Surplus Stores and with a 7" blade is long enough, sharp enough and heavy enough to do the job relatively easy. :o



There is a difference between merely killing somebody and chopping them into little pieces.

User avatar
Global Citizen
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 675
Joined: Mon, 07 Mar 2005
Location: Still looking for Paradise

Postby Global Citizen » Sat, 09 Aug 2008 7:56 am

Just got back from Canada and this was all over the news. The guy has not spoken one word since his arrest, not even to his lawyer. According to his employer, this psycho was a model employee; quiet, hardworking and punctual. How many times has this description been used on the perpetrators of the most heinous crimes? Guess it's the quiet ones we have to watch out for, the ones who never make any waves outwardly, while a raging inferno simmers within.
One man's meat is another's poison.

User avatar
Global Citizen
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 675
Joined: Mon, 07 Mar 2005
Location: Still looking for Paradise

Postby Global Citizen » Sat, 09 Aug 2008 8:11 am

earthfriendly wrote:
Which brings on the next question. Could it be premeditated? One needs to be prepared and gather all the right tools for the act.



My understanding of this is that he's been charged with second degree murder which means not premeditated; he was carrying the right tools so the intent was there but the victim was chosen at random, in this case the poor victim, 22 year old Tim Mclean was seated asleep next to him. Terrible tragedy and I really feel for his family's loss.
One man's meat is another's poison.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34258
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 09 Aug 2008 12:19 pm

Plavt wrote:
There is a difference between merely killing somebody and chopping them into little pieces.


:???: Who said anything about chopping somebody into little pieces? I thought the guy cut the victims head off? Gutting a deer means splitting the sturum of the deer which like removing a head, means splitting or finding the joint between two vertebrae in the neck. It's obvious you've never been large game hunting. Most of the aussies and yanks & canucks will know what I'm talking about though.


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “General Discussions”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests