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biking in singapore streets

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besito
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Postby besito » Mon, 12 May 2008 2:26 pm

I will probably live in district 05... buona vista, dover, clementi area. Am using giant bike.

rasserie
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Postby rasserie » Mon, 16 Jun 2008 2:50 am

if its a bicycle, chances are, its dangerous to cycle on the road.

if u cycle on the pavement meant for pedestrians, chances are the pedestrians would not like it.

either way, u are stuck.

if i were to choose between the two, i would have chosen the pavement coz safety is first.


and also, sad to say, singaporean drivers are mean. im a singaporean FYI.

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durain
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Postby durain » Mon, 16 Jun 2008 6:40 am

if you gonna be cycling at night, defo get some lights and some high viz stuff. maybe use the high viz stuff during the day as well!

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sundaymorningstaple
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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 16 Jun 2008 11:25 am

besito wrote:Am using giant bike.


How tall ARE YOU?!? :o

How much bigger is a giant bike from a normal one? :P

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Postby zjules » Mon, 16 Jun 2008 1:56 pm

When we go biking places, usually book a 'London' cab or maxicab. Can fit a couple of bikes in, and theyre used to transporting them.

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Postby taxico » Mon, 16 Jun 2008 7:16 pm

you only need a bungee cable and a the bike can be transported in a regular sized cab/car.

remove the front wheel and put it inside the vehicle.

if you know how to remove/install the rear wheel (chain/cog) then you may not even need the cord depending on how large the frame is.

i fit a 60cm race frame perfectly in a normal sized sedan.

besito
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Postby besito » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 5:05 pm

Thanks for all the advise. Appreciate it.

Is it safe to leave a descent bike (costs about SGD800) in the MRT station during daytime? Maybe just put a $10 lock on it. My place is about 15/20mins walk, so, am thinking of using my bike to/from MRT station. Thoughts?

Also, any bike shop near kembangan/eunos?

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Postby micknlea » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 9:48 pm

No way would I leave any bike at an MRT station, you only need to read the latest chat about how many bikes are nicked from exactly those places to realise that a $10 lock is not going to do any good. I know a few people who have done just that and lost their bikes, and two of them were secondhand and not worth much either.
If you are riding something worth $800 it will likely be gone by the time you get back for it.
"My husband said it was him or the cat...I miss him sometimes." - Unknown

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Postby besito » Sat, 19 Jul 2008 12:11 am

I finally did brought my bike here in SG. Did bike around the last couple of weeks and am actually surprised that drivers give way to bikes :). Especially bus and taxi drivers. Initially, based from postings in this forum, you'll be scared to go biking on the road here in SG, but you should not be. There are some private cars that sometimes gets close to you, but they won't cut your path or something. And whats more, everywhere you go has the pedestrian lanes on the side which you can pass as well. People, especially old people, are actually friendly.. you just have to pay them respect by slowing down and do the "ting ting" :). And they are always helpful when you are lost. Overall, I believe Singapore streets are good for bikers.

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sundaymorningstaple
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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 19 Jul 2008 9:47 am

Just don't get too complacent and take cage drivers for granted. Saying that Singapore Street are good for bike riders flies in the face of all the experiences of us here as well as all the press in the local papers as well. The information we give you is based on lots of years experience here. In the words of the old US TV show "Candid Camera". "When you least expect it........"

WHAM!

But don't take our word for it. Sometimes it's better learned first hand. If you get complacent you'll definitely learn. At least that way, if you survive, you'll know better the next time! Always look for it to happen! Also be careful of cars that have a tendency to stop near the curb and just open up their doors to drop off a person without thinking (happens near MRT stations often). :P

besito
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Postby besito » Sat, 19 Jul 2008 11:10 am

SMS, Noted... thats a good one. I'll definitely keep that in my mind. cheers!

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Postby jfd » Tue, 23 Dec 2008 9:31 am

Thanks for all the info guys! I will be heading to Singapore soon and will be keen to bring my (road) bike along.

I have been riding for years on the streets of Tokyo, and from this thread it seems Singapore needs to be tackled with the same attitude - never assume drivers will do what they should do.

I am a bit concerned over how safe my bike will be if I leave it around town though. Am I still at risk of losing it if I use 2 locks? (I generally have one lock to lock front wheel to frame, and another for back wheel to frame, and if I can, also around a pole.) I never take the bicycle computer off the handlebars here in Tokyo, but assume I will need to in Singapore?

BTW, have been reading various posts from this forum for the last few days - lots of great info here, so just generally, thanks! :D

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 23 Dec 2008 9:57 am

Would be a good idea to remove anything that is easily removable. including things like speedometers, water bottles, tool carriers, pannier bags, and especially the saddle if it a gel filled ergonomically designed new style seat. Put it this way, if it's easily removable and you don't remove it, someone else will.

Forewarned is forearmed. :wink:

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Postby jfd » Tue, 23 Dec 2008 10:16 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:...and especially the saddle if it a gel filled ergonomically designed new style seat. Put it this way, if it's easily removable and you don't remove it, someone else will.

Forewarned is forearmed. :wink:


Noted, thanks for the advice. My saddle is a high quality one, but it is not that new, and in any case it is not attached to frame with a quick release lever, it is attached by allen-key bolts, which means without the right tools, it should not be easy to steal. Does that mean it should be ok, or are those that are likely to steal items of value quite determined?

My bike was a bit pricey, so I am a little concerned about theft. :(

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Postby smayrhofer » Tue, 23 Dec 2008 11:27 am

Your concern is totally warranted. Petty theft is huge here - I've had two bikes stolen before. One I left unlocked for a moment at east coast park (I know - I was practically begging for it to be stolen), the other was locked and parked at a swimming complex. Neither was expensive.

Don't leave it locked anywhere overnight, because with a little more time and the cover of darkness, your seat may disappear too.

Good luck!


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