Hot chicks, cheap drinks, cool crowd.

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melbournejustice
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Hot chicks, cheap drinks, cool crowd.

Post by melbournejustice » Mon, 05 May 2008 11:46 pm

Where can I find all of the above?

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sundaymorningstaple
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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 06 May 2008 1:07 pm

Melbourne?
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

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Post by Gilly » Tue, 06 May 2008 1:50 pm

No hot chicks in Melbourne :-&

melbournejustice
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Post by melbournejustice » Wed, 07 May 2008 12:22 am

Anyway, what's the deal with white men and asian chicks here. What's wrong with Asian men? Someone enlighten me.

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Re: Hot chicks, cheap drinks, cool crowd.

Post by hei guess what » Wed, 07 May 2008 10:57 am

melbournejustice wrote:Hot chicks, cheap drinks . . . Where can I find all of the above?
Thailand?

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Post by at914 » Thu, 08 May 2008 11:31 am

melbournejustice wrote:Anyway, what's the deal with white men and asian chicks here. What's wrong with Asian men? Someone enlighten me.

Its more about the personality than the race. Nothing wrong with asian men. Just most of them are really shy, skinny, and awkward. Or maybe its just my impression.

But again I'm asian and I'm dating a white guy right now.

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Post by melbournejustice » Thu, 08 May 2008 12:44 pm

With due respect, Asian men (I take this to mean East Asian men) are not shy, skinny and awkward! It's a farcical generalization based on ignorance.

First, one is bound to look awkward if he or she is forced to speak another foreign language. So, one must not expect a Mandarin- or Hokkien-speaking person to be totally at ease in speaking English vis-a-vis a native English speaker. Similarly, Westerners with no knowledge of Mandarin in China would be equally seen as 'awkward' in the Chinese context. Language matters.

Second, Asians, particularly Chinese, are not shy. In fact, I would go as far as to say that they are generally more comfortable with their sexuality than Westerners. For example, there is less sexual tension between the opposite sex in an Asian work setting than a Western setting. Asian women also generally do not feel too much of a need to flaunt their body, boobs, hips, etc. True story: Two women, one Chinese and the other American, waiting for their husbands in the hospital to pick them up after giving birth. The American mother was putting on her make-up. The Chinese mother was looking at her and asked her why she had to do that particularly after giving birth. The American mother wanted to look 'good' for her husband. The Chinese mother thought this ridiculous: "What makes her think that she is not 'good enough' to begin with?" Read Francis Hsu's Americans and Chinese: Passage to Differences for an insight on this matter. Space constraints prevents me on talking on this matter at length.

Third, Asians, particularly Chinese, are not skinny. In fact, China is currently facing the battle of the bulge. Chinese kids are getting too fat!

My advice then is to observe people in their own cultural setting, including language and that [we] as responsible and educated human beings must not foist our own idea or ideas of 'a good life' on others. That said, if Westerners think that the world 6.5 million people who live in Asia, Latin America and Africa appreciate being preached by the 800 million who live in the West, then the world should buckle up for a truly rough journey in this century.

So, contrary to your views, at914, Asians are not as weak as you think. Perception here is important because it affects how one reacts and responds to another person or a group. I know because I have lived abroad for over twenty years in both the East and the West and have seen the real change in people's lives, particulary Asians, who have gone from abject poverty to prosperity in a span of three to four decades-- an incredibly short time in nation-building and perhaps unheard of in human history. If anything, Asians are determined not weak and gung ho not shy. For this reason, I know Asians resent being seen as second-class global citizens.

As a Jewish scholar once said: 'Experience is more forceful than logic.' Take this wisdom to heart. Don't further aggravate Asians and put them in a negative light. Having achieved success in such a short time, they will no longer listen to the West. The ideas contained in this text are solely mine.
Last edited by melbournejustice on Fri, 09 May 2008 1:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 08 May 2008 3:53 pm

Recently arrived here have you? Haven't had a chance to see the local male population in all their splendor yet? The perception espoused above is like all perceptions, it's not usually the overwhelming majority, but it is a very large minority that stand out like sore thumbs. When the most telling traits here is being work-a-holics coupled with the 3rd lowest fertility in the world. (1.32 I believe it is currently), AND their (the boys) penchant for whining and whinging about having to do National Service while "the girls" don't, it does tend to tar all males here with the same brush. That and the extremely high levels of ED noted in Singapore ( http://www.sma.org.sg/smj/4401/4401a3.pdf ) and the highest incidences of Myopia (60+% of the population by the time they hit JC) all tend towards confirming the stereotype at least here in Singapore - not necessarily all Asian Males however .......

However, it must be said, that as more and more local males go overseas for educations they seem to find their "maleness" and they tend to stand out or are at least comfortable with their maleness and don't have to whine about everything. For that matter, some of them actually carry their own books instead of making the maids do it. :o
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

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Post by banana » Thu, 08 May 2008 4:09 pm

Wow SMS, anything else you wanna put down about the males in your adopted country? I totally get that the view you share is entirely subjective, just like everyone elses' but that sounded a little harsh.

I happen to be one of those who "found my maleness" and I can assure you, it has nothing to do with having gone overseas. What it is is simply learning to express masculinity in a more globalised (read: westernised) way.

It's something that is personally comfortable but once you hang out (does anyone still say this?) at certain establishments and are able to objectively observe people, you will realise thoroughbred local males just express themselves differently. Unfortunately, the more English educated females also tend to believe and aspire towards the western lifestyles espoused on mass media, hence the popularity and perceived alpha-ness of westerners and westernised males.

So yeah, put that in your pipe and smoke it.
some signatures are more equal than others

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Post by sierra2469alpha » Thu, 08 May 2008 4:19 pm

melbournejustice wrote: As a Jewish scholar once said: 'Experience is more forceful than logic.'
Quoting Isaac Abrabanel. Impressive. An "interesting" choice of quote given the subject matter of the posting.

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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 08 May 2008 6:10 pm

banana wrote:Wow SMS, anything else you wanna put down about the males in your adopted country? I totally get that the view you share is entirely subjective, just like everyone elses' but that sounded a little harsh.
ED - Fact, not subjective
Myopia - Fact, not subjective
Fertility Rate - Fact, not subjective
Whinging about NS - Fact, just read any forum or local daily

"not usually the overwhelming majority, but it is a very large minority" - Fact I hope. If it's the majority there really is trouble.

What's subjective? :???:

I'm not saying this is what I believe. I'm saying it is the perception more times than not. Just like the impression that at914 has (I believe she is Asian as well? And Singaporean) Not all Singaporean are kiasu but enough are that the moniker sticks doesn't it? Same goes with the Buffet Syndrome. You know and I know it not true, but the percentage is higher than most other places and that how the stereotypes get formed.

:-|
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

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Post by melbournejustice » Fri, 09 May 2008 12:41 am

SundayMorningStaples, your proposition that Asian males have to go overseas to find their 'maleness' - whatever that means - underscores your lack of appreciation and understanding of East Asian cultures. At another level, it's insulting, not only to Asians, but I believe, to Westerners, too.

Second, this proposition assumes that what is good in the West is also good for Asia - an assertion that is out of touch with the current Asian zeitgeist. In fact, I know of no scholar who would agree with your assertion. Hence, this proposition is poppycock to the nth degree.

Third, the fact that Singaporean males suffer from ED, myopia, low fertility rates and complain incessantly about their conscription does not mean that they are any less 'male' for the reason that you have not defined what being 'male' means. Had you done so, your argument may have gained more traction. I use of word 'may' in the last sentence because I know that it would be near impossible to convince the world (apart from the Klu Klux Klan and their ilk), particularly the Chinese and Indians, including many of my right-thinking Western friends, that the only legitimate form of masculinity is the Western form.

My view is that the world has since moved on from your colonial mindset where Asians are seen as decadent, poor, corrupt and worse, unable to decide for themselves what it best for them. If anything, one should applaud Singaporeans for their intelligence and guts to defy the West during the 1960s and implement export-oriented policies instead of import-oriented substitution policies - which as we have seen, ruin economies! That said, China and India, having learnt from the miraculous 'Tiger' economies (Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong), have primed their industries for exports to the rich West since the late twentieth century; and increasingly, for their burgeoning domestic market.

Furthermore, from Christendom right up to the mid-twentieth century, the Jews were not able to define themselves. Others, particularly Germans of the latter generation, defined what it meant to be a Jew. They thought they know better. In hindsight, we all know now that these people were wrong to believe in what they did. As a result, many innocent lives, particularly Jewish lives, were lost. Today, the West, particularly the Western media, tries to define, in vain in my view, what it means to be a Muslim. I have learnt from history and in my brief sojourn in this world that I must not, within reasonable limits, as a matter of principle and good neighborliness, even attempt to impose my idea of a 'good life' on others. To do so would devoid others a psychological breathing space to create their own identity. Let Asians define their own identity.

Anyway, can you tell me now where I can find my hot chicks, cheap drinks, and a cool crowd in Singapore? I am past my academic life! It's just that I felt an obligation to correct this Western bias given my background. Without correction, there would be no end to problems; and I simply love this world too much to let it happen!

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Post by banana » Fri, 09 May 2008 8:18 am

Subjective as in these are your perceptions based on your observation as a non Singaporean (yes, we all know you've been here for 25 years, blah blah blah), as in you have not gone through NS, you have not faced the pressures of maintaining cultural identity in a changing world because let's face it, white man culture is still largely the standard, rightly so or not.

But we digress, OP wanted places to go. melbournejustice, I'm guessing you're looking for joints somewhat off the beaten track. you probably know your zouks and clarke quays yeah? try places along Dempsey Road or Rochester Drive if you're looking for something classier. Loof is not a bad start either.

when you're ready for a more local experience, there are a few places around Boat Quay that aren't as dodgy or filled with expats of the wanker variety. you just have to know where to look. apparently St James Powerstation is quite popular as well.

finally, when people recognise you are cool, someone will bring you to the really good places. :lol:

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Post by kaseyma » Fri, 09 May 2008 8:59 am

Drinks are never cheap in SG, but there are a lot of party places.
The places mentioned above are a good start (St James Powerstation, Zouks and others at Clarke Quay, Dempsey Road, etc.).
Time to explore. :)

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Post by melbournejustice » Sat, 10 May 2008 4:13 pm

Hi All, I appreciate the recommendations. I will check those places out.

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