American family relocating-comments on school for son

Discuss about childcare, parenthood, playschools, educational, family & international school issues.

Sponsored by:

Canadian International School
Post Reply
walkerstr3
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue, 18 Mar 2008 10:12 pm

American family relocating-comments on school for son

Post by walkerstr3 » Wed, 19 Mar 2008 12:05 am

We are considering a relocation to Singapore this year and are looking for American school for 10 year old. We would appreciate comments on the Singapore American School. Are there wait lists? Also, what areas to consider looking for living. We would also bring dog and cat, so not sure that apartment or condo would be for us!
Lots to think about & consider, but getting excited about the prospects and opportunities that await us! : D

User avatar
road.not.taken
Editor
Editor
Posts: 1293
Joined: Sat, 06 Oct 2007 9:24 am

Post by road.not.taken » Wed, 19 Mar 2008 6:19 am

Yes, for sure there are wait lists at the American School, they vary in length from grade to grade. I would call and speak to Admissions as soon as possible and check out their website:


www.sas.edu.sg

Expansion plans are in the works, but it'll be a few years before the new facility is complete. Would your son be a 5th grader or 6th grader next year? Intermediate school is grades 3 - 5, middle school is 6 - 8.

The American school has a great reputation which is well-deserved. The facilities are top-notch, it is academically rigorous and demonstrates a commitment to community service. Parents are encouraged to volunteer at every grade level and the after-school sports and enrichment programs are strong. The curriculum is American, but international in scope and the student body is culturally, quite diverse. If you have any specific questions, let me know.

Once school is sorted out, then your choices for living arrangements will become clearer. Good luck!


:)

walkerstr3
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue, 18 Mar 2008 10:12 pm

Post by walkerstr3 » Wed, 19 Mar 2008 11:45 am

Thanks for the response RNT!

Our son will be a fifth grader. It sounds as though I will need to move quickly on this. I would rather not begin mid year, if even a possibility?(do students transition well mid year?)

User avatar
road.not.taken
Editor
Editor
Posts: 1293
Joined: Sat, 06 Oct 2007 9:24 am

Post by road.not.taken » Wed, 19 Mar 2008 11:59 am

Mine did, but it's much better if they start at the beginning of the school year, August 11th this year. Lot's of 'new' kids then and he'll be able to sign up for extra-curricular activities before they are full. You'll be there at the right time to take advantage of all the information for parents, Back-to-school night, etc...

Call the school ASAP, get an idea of his chances, and start exploring alternatives. Lots of people on this board will tell you why local schools were successful for them -- for us it was not even a consideration (in other words, we more than likely would not have made the move if SAS was full). You're smart to be doing as much research as you can before you decide on moving. Lots of people don't and get here and face one rude awakening.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 40225
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 1:26 pm
Answers: 11
Location: Retired on the Little Red Dot

Post by sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 19 Mar 2008 1:38 pm

road.not.taken,

I've just got to ask what's up? This comment is not like you at all.
Lots of people on this board will tell you why local schools were successful for them --


The only time people get those kinds of recommendation are when they are relevant. The OP didn't ask anything about any schools other than SAS, international, local or otherwise. Why such an unworthy comment especially from you? TTOM? :?
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

User avatar
road.not.taken
Editor
Editor
Posts: 1293
Joined: Sat, 06 Oct 2007 9:24 am

Post by road.not.taken » Wed, 19 Mar 2008 2:02 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:road.not.taken,

I've just got to ask what's up? This comment is not like you at all.
Lots of people on this board will tell you why local schools were successful for them --


The only time people get those kinds of recommendation are when they are relevant. The OP didn't ask anything about any schools other than SAS, international, local or otherwise. Why such an unworthy comment especially from you? TTOM? :?
:???:

SMS, I guess you misunderstood my post?? I only meant that local schools have lots of proponents on this board (and inferred that there were other threads to research at the same time).

Since all of the International Schools have wait lists at present, it seemed only natural to mention local schools as they are the only viable option.

I think you've assigned a 'tone' to my language that I didn't intend at all. I only meant that other board members have found local schools to be successful, nothing more.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 40225
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 1:26 pm
Answers: 11
Location: Retired on the Little Red Dot

Post by sundaymorningstaple » Wed, 19 Mar 2008 10:24 pm

Fair enough, my apologies. That's often the problem with the written word isn't it. It just hit me the wrong way this morning. Actually still does but nevermind. Maybe just me. :wink:
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

walkerstr3
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue, 18 Mar 2008 10:12 pm

Post by walkerstr3 » Thu, 20 Mar 2008 12:45 am

Truly appreciate the input and heads up!!
I have spent time downloading/copying so that I'll know what to get from the school here.
This is happening very quickly and with the start of school so early (comparatively!)< I feel as though I need to hit the ground running with this!
I am interested in SAS primarily for its reputation and from what I have gathered, opportunities offered that parallel to activities we are involved in here (Academically, Scouts, & sports)
Our 10 y.o. is having the initial "I don't want to move" and leave friends, et al. We want to make this as positive and exciting (enticing-bribery- hopefully not!??!) as possible!! Any suggestions with acceptance of the whole idea? He is an extremely flexible kid, but we are throwing a lot at him with this!
I am also hoping that the Company will assist us here as necessary, plus, they are paying for our son's schooling. We are very fortunate :)
Thanks again for the input...
Problem with e-mail vs. in person is "tone". None taken on this end!!!
I am not sure how it will change my thoughts for relocate if we are not in the school of choice! It is an AWESOME opportunity for us, but REALLY want school of choice!! Not asking for too much am I??!! :?
Replies are helping me on this end too! :)

User avatar
maneo
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 751
Joined: Sat, 15 Mar 2008 2:46 pm
Location: Tropical cosmopolitan island

Post by maneo » Thu, 20 Mar 2008 2:41 am

Best thing to help the transition is for the kid to get actively involved in some activity he/she really likes.

My daughter was just 7 when we first arrived in SG.
She was in a bad mood complaining daily about the friends she missed until we joined a club where she could ride horses.
Compared to riding twice a year in CA, riding 2-3 times a week in SG was wonderful.

User avatar
road.not.taken
Editor
Editor
Posts: 1293
Joined: Sat, 06 Oct 2007 9:24 am

Post by road.not.taken » Thu, 20 Mar 2008 8:24 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:Fair enough, my apologies. That's often the problem with the written word isn't it. It just hit me the wrong way this morning. Actually still does but nevermind. Maybe just me. :wink:
Apology accepted :wink: I went back and re-read it a few times and for the life of me, I can't see how it was misinterpreted but obviously it was, sorry!

Have you ever heard of the Four Agreements? A book by don Miguel Ruiz? I really don't go for self help books, and truthfully never read this one -- but I couldn't help but think of it, after reading your post (here they are, more or less, paraphrased:

1. Be Careful With Your Words. Speak with integrity and truthfully, say only what you mean to say and avoid using the word to speak against yourself or to gossip about others.

2. Don't take anything personally because nothing others do is because of you. What others say and do is a projection of them, not you. When you can learn this, you can avoid a whole lot of hurt. (I have trouble with this, because if you decide not to take things personally, that means not taking the bad -- and the good).

3. Don't make assumptions, ask questions, no mattr how hard they are to ask and communicate with others as clearly as you can to avoid misunderstandings, sadness and drama. (A very important one for forum members!)

4. Always do your best, even though it might change from moment to moment; it will be different when you are healthy as opposed to sick. Under any circumstance, simply do your best, and you will avoid self-judgment, self-abuse and regret. The boy scouts had it right!

Seems like a lot of misunderstandings on the board could be cleared up if people followed these guidelines more often. :roll:

PhoenixT
Member
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri, 05 Oct 2007 12:20 pm

Helping son's transition

Post by PhoenixT » Thu, 20 Mar 2008 9:13 am

Hi there OP- I used to do cross-cultural training for expats and their families; mainly working with children prior to their move. I agree with the other poster that you should sign him up for activities that he enjoys so that once you're here, he's too busy having fun and meeting new friends. Though all of you will go through some degree of culture shock, it will help you all to stay busy.

In preparation though, of course the biggest thing is to hear him out and his concerns and ask him to also understand that this is a great opportunity for the FAMILY- and that includes him. The best is to try and find another 10 y.o. or similar age who has done the move and let him talk to this person. Also, expose him a little to things that are Asian - I don't know if you're close to a Chinatown or Little India in the states - take him to eat dim sum/ yum cha while you're still in the US. What I used to like to do in my programs was go to the travel agencies and get a load of brochures/ magazines on Singapore and surrounding countries - then have the child cut out photos and paste them on a 5x6 index card --- making 'postcards' and 'we're moving cards' that he can send to his friends.

Good luck on the move. Ask your husband's company if they would consider sending you all to a cross-cultural training program - one that includes your son or has one especially for him.

User avatar
road.not.taken
Editor
Editor
Posts: 1293
Joined: Sat, 06 Oct 2007 9:24 am

Re: Helping son's transition

Post by road.not.taken » Thu, 20 Mar 2008 9:32 am

PhoenixT wrote:I agree with the other poster that you should sign him up for activities that he enjoys so that once you're here, he's too busy having fun and meeting new friends.
That's one of the reasons the American school is so attractive -- it has American football, baseball, boy scouts, lacrosse, etc... all easily accessible. Makes it much easier for kids to plug in and find friends.

walkerstr3
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue, 18 Mar 2008 10:12 pm

Post by walkerstr3 » Thu, 20 Mar 2008 9:42 pm

I feel so much better!
Thanks PhoenixT, I love the suggestion of making postcards!
He/we are adventurous eaters here, so I'm sure we'll love the food there!
Lacrosse-hooray!!! Other activities sound wonderful!! I don't think it will be much to get involved, I guess it is the unknowns that we can't answer for our kid at this time!! We look forward to checking it all out!
I will add to my list of things to ask!
I was also able to connect with someone in Sg last night-so I am feeling a bit better about some of the "unknowns" that go along with this adventure!!
Thanks again for the insight and replies! :lol:

Taga-Bukid
Member
Member
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu, 04 Oct 2007 2:53 pm

Post by Taga-Bukid » Fri, 21 Mar 2008 8:24 am

In addition, buy a Vonage unit or any other VOIP in the US, the USB-type w/c you can plug into your computer (i.e. avoid the 110V / 220V issue). This way your 10 year old can call his friends in the US and stay in touch with them. By getting a VOIP or Vonage in the US you can get a local US telephone # (I don't think you can get this with VOIPs here in SG). Your son's friends can call him as well, without incurring overseas charges. Further benefit is that all minutes are free as they're included in the monthly $25. Also get a computer webcam so that your son can still "see" his friends and they can see him while they're chatting (with your approval of course and at reasonable times/hours), assuming his friends have webcams as well.

We arrived November of last year and both the Vonage and webcams have helped in our daughter's transition. Our oldest, 8 years old, calls her friends and cousins and sees them during chats.

There is a waitlist @ SAS. Severity depends upon their grade as posted earlier. Our daughters have been on the waitlist since November, but it looks like they've got spots for the next academic year starting this fall. The facilities are great.

Good luck with the move.

blueoon
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat, 22 Mar 2008 2:30 pm
Location: woodlands

Post by blueoon » Sat, 22 Mar 2008 2:48 pm

hmmm seems so complicated..

anyway, all the best!

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “Parenting, Family & Schools”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests