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Mandarin language exchange partner required

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andrewcox
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Mandarin language exchange partner required

Postby andrewcox » Sun, 02 Mar 2008 3:13 pm

Hi, I'm looking to improve my Chinese Mandarin.

I can offer English language in exchange!

Andrew

Robertzhang
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Re: Mandarin language exchange partner required

Postby Robertzhang » Mon, 03 Mar 2008 11:57 am

andrewcox wrote:Hi, I'm looking to improve my Chinese Mandarin.

I can offer English language in exchange!

Andrew

Hi Andrew,
I am native of China, resident in Dalian, China. I would offer Chinese language in exchange. My phone No. 86-13384117870 My name is Audrey. Wait for ur reply at any time.

welshlass
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Postby welshlass » Mon, 03 Mar 2008 11:17 pm

wow- sounds like it gona be an expensive lesson all the way from China !

was hoping to hear from someone in Spore as also interested - but then am an absolute beginner !

andrewcox
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Postby andrewcox » Mon, 03 Mar 2008 11:51 pm

Yeah, Dalian is too far! I'm looking for a face-to-face language exchange!

Welshlass, I recommend a short evening course to supplement the conversation partner thing....i tried language exchange (without any foundation) but ended up teaching more English than learning any Chinese.

twisterr
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Postby twisterr » Tue, 04 Mar 2008 12:15 am

im currently learning mandarin from a preschool teacher from china who also happens to be my colleague...
it's very basic...i can try asking her if she wants to exchange language with you guys...


edit: i've asked her and she's quite keen...do pm me if you are still interested and we can arrange something.
Last edited by twisterr on Wed, 05 Mar 2008 10:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

yuji
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Postby yuji » Wed, 05 Mar 2008 10:11 am

hi i can speak chinese, but no experience on teaching. I keen to brush up my english so if you dont mind, mayb we can meet up to work out soemthing.

hamamatsu1999
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Postby hamamatsu1999 » Thu, 06 Mar 2008 9:07 am

If you need professional help, you can check out http://dajiahaochinese.blogspot.com here.

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Postby Robertzhang » Thu, 06 Mar 2008 11:16 am

hamamatsu1999 wrote:If you need professional help, you can check out http://dajiahaochinese.blogspot.com here.

Hi,
I cannot brows the website. If I want to find a Chinese mandarin teacher job, will I find it at there? U kown I am a senior high school Chinese teacher in Dalian,China. I want to find the same job in Singapore.which school supply work permit visa.Could u give me some idear?
Thank u!

viv81
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Postby viv81 » Thu, 06 Mar 2008 12:33 pm

xxx
Last edited by viv81 on Wed, 11 Feb 2009 12:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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ksl
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Postby ksl » Thu, 06 Mar 2008 12:58 pm

Robertzhang wrote:
hamamatsu1999 wrote:If you need professional help, you can check out http://dajiahaochinese.blogspot.com here.

Hi,
I cannot brows the website. If I want to find a Chinese mandarin teacher job, will I find it at there? U kown I am a senior high school Chinese teacher in Dalian,China. I want to find the same job in Singapore.which school supply work permit visa.Could u give me some idear?
Thank u!


You shouldn't have a problem finding a job, with your enthusiasm, although keeping it is another matter! Are you telling the truth? :???: It would be silly to underestimate people in Singapore, they have very good experience with mainland China! Many of your countrymen have already let the side down :wink: Although if everything is authentic, you will have nothing to worry about :)

http://www.singaporeexpats.com/forum/ftopic47981.html

quincylin
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Postby quincylin » Fri, 07 Mar 2008 11:35 pm

chinese mandarin is easy to learn..i speak mandarin, its got simple syntax, put chinese characters aside, once you get to know pinyin, like espanol, you can read out any word.

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ksl
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Postby ksl » Sat, 08 Mar 2008 12:35 am

quincylin wrote:chinese mandarin is easy to learn..i speak mandarin, its got simple syntax, put chinese characters aside, once you get to know pinyin, like espanol, you can read out any word.


You may be able to read it out, but to read it out correctly is another matter, with each character having 4 tones, these tones, are not that easy to master....Also Danish language, a handful of letters of the alphabet are also very difficult to master...even after 25 years of living, there, i still have difficulty with them.

Chinese and any other language is easy to learn when young, but over the age of 25, pronounciation becomes, a main issue for most. Only practice and correction, by listening to oneself, can you hear, the mistakes, some foreigners, speak better Chinese than most Chinese, and it is the same in English language too....Many Singaporeans can speak better English, than Englishmen.

Language is on going, there is always room for improvement of the vocabulary.

But you are right to say Chinese syntax is easy, and people will understand you, even though it is never used that way.

I love the learning of Characters and stroke order, although remembering them is another matter!

Being married to a Taiwanese was also a problem for me, because I had studied pin yin, in Beijing and Taiwan used the American system of wade giles, however Taipei have recently dropped wade giles system for pin yin, which is a step in the right direction for the British :P

My Chinese pronounciation still sucks, because i never speak Chinese much anymore, the wife has never had the patience to help out, and only speaks American English.
Although I have since been told, it's because i have lost the mid range sounds of my hearing, that i have had difficulty listening to the tones while in the linguistics class, due to military service, so hearing the tones is not easy any more.

Can you imagine how i feel about that, when listening to music!

dixy
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hi

Postby dixy » Sat, 08 Mar 2008 4:26 am

hey
i wanna learn mandarin as well, i know around 10%-15% so far
courtesy, my fellow colleagues,
i m fine with pinyin, i think anyone who is willing to make a good conversation over a cup of coffee in the town would be awesome,
anyone up for this?
lemme know
Dx
Everything will be OK in the End..if its not OK then ITS NOT YET THE END..:)

hamamatsu1999
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Postby hamamatsu1999 » Sat, 08 Mar 2008 12:27 pm

I am a part time English and Chinese teacher teaching in a school and privately. I am working on my French exam. I would like to have language exchange in French for my preparation for this exam. I prefer a semi formal setting with some goals and purposes. If you want more than casual chats over coffee for your English or Chinese and you can help me with French, contact me.

hamamatsu1999@hotmail.com

Cheuk

quincylin
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Postby quincylin » Mon, 10 Mar 2008 7:26 pm

ksl wrote:
quincylin wrote:chinese mandarin is easy to learn..i speak mandarin, its got simple syntax, put chinese characters aside, once you get to know pinyin, like espanol, you can read out any word.


You may be able to read it out, but to read it out correctly is another matter, with each character having 4 tones, these tones, are not that easy to master....Also Danish language, a handful of letters of the alphabet are also very difficult to master...even after 25 years of living, there, i still have difficulty with them.

Chinese and any other language is easy to learn when young, but over the age of 25, pronounciation becomes, a main issue for most. Only practice and correction, by listening to oneself, can you hear, the mistakes, some foreigners, speak better Chinese than most Chinese, and it is the same in English language too....Many Singaporeans can speak better English, than Englishmen.

Language is on going, there is always room for improvement of the vocabulary.

But you are right to say Chinese syntax is easy, and people will understand you, even though it is never used that way.

I love the learning of Characters and stroke order, although remembering them is another matter!

Being married to a Taiwanese was also a problem for me, because I had studied pin yin, in Beijing and Taiwan used the American system of wade giles, however Taipei have recently dropped wade giles system for pin yin, which is a step in the right direction for the British :P

My Chinese pronounciation still sucks, because i never speak Chinese much anymore, the wife has never had the patience to help out, and only speaks American English.
Although I have since been told, it's because i have lost the mid range sounds of my hearing, that i have had difficulty listening to the tones while in the linguistics class, due to military service, so hearing the tones is not easy any more.

Can you imagine how i feel about that, when listening to music!





first, pinyin and wade giles are different, both of them are chinese romanization, basically we use pinyin as chinese romanization, and now it's the most common system in use around the world. In taiwan they commonly use Zhuyin, (ㄆㄧㄣ ㄧㄣ) which is more difficult to learn.

since there are only 4 tones of "yun mus" in pinyin, make sure you practice reading and keeping them firmly in mind. such as a, can be read as ā, á, ǎ, à, i wont explain more. after you know the tones, you can read any word like dá(达),shá(啥). there's always a "practice makes perfect!".

yes, languages are on going including programing languages, yet the soul of a language, is not its vocabulary, but the culture behind it.

well, for chinese characters, i think the easist is the simplified one, in singapore they usually use simplified chinese in the public. in taiwan and hongkong they use traditional one. chinese may spend years learning familiar characters during schooldays.

i think you should try one-on-one tutoring if you decide to learn better. i doubt if language exchange doesnt work well.

Happy Chinese-Learning!


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