Singapore Expats Forum

Should I bring my ktichenaid mixer and gas barbecue grill?

Moving to Singapore? Ask our regular expats in Singapore questions on relocation and their experience here. Ask about banking, employment pass, insurance, visa, work permit, citizenship or immigration issues.

Sponsored by:
Image
The Club Residences

Brooklynjenn
Regular
Regular
Posts: 77
Joined: Fri, 08 Jul 2011
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Postby Brooklynjenn » Sat, 03 Mar 2012 12:05 am

Holland V is a mall there, but I guess technically the electronics store, Parisilk, is around the block from it.

movingtospore
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 699
Joined: Thu, 23 Jul 2009

Postby movingtospore » Sat, 24 Mar 2012 3:32 pm

mrsmonkie wrote:I would definitely bring the kitchenaid and other appliances. I really regret not packing all my electrical goods.

I've since wasted a huge amount of money on new toasters/irons/kettles/juice machine etc... all at a much greater cost and with limited variety as back home (Australia).

I'm a HUGE homewares fan and Singapore has a very limited variety. It's either VERY cheap or VERY expensive. I left this great wine bottle opener back in Sydney and I saw the exact one displayed in Singapore for $199.00 (same brand)....it only costs $25.00 back home :mad:

If you're not heading back home for another 5-7 years there's no point in all your electrical goods collecting dust...and anyhow what's to say you return and you realise half the stuff are old and needs upgrading.

Good luck with your move.:)


Yes, but for Americans and Canadians, those lovely appliances will burn right out on the different electrical system, even with converters. I know, mine did. :D You could call kitchenaid and ask them if they can send you a whole new electrical cord etc to install? This worked for our computers - got on that after the food processor nearly burnt up.
:P

User avatar
JR8
Immortal
Immortal
Posts: 16514
Joined: Wed, 24 Mar 2010
Location: K. Puki Manis

Postby JR8 » Sun, 25 Mar 2012 4:17 pm

movingtospore wrote:Yes, but for Americans and Canadians, those lovely appliances will burn right out on the different electrical system, even with converters.

Can you clarify what you mean by 'converter'? Do you mean like a plug adaptor, or a transformer?


I know, mine did. :D

:o Uncool!

You could call kitchenaid and ask them if they can send you a whole new electrical cord etc to install? This worked for our computers - got on that after the food processor nearly burnt up.
:P

I don't know about the 'electrical cord'. Seems to me the appliance would be being fed 240V instead of 110V so you may need to convert the supply. I say may as some appliances work on both 110 and 240v, like phone chargers and electric shavers (I just checked both of mine to be sure :)). My wife's old Dell laptop had the transformer built into the power cable and it had a switch to manually flip it from 110 <>240v. The charger on her new Macbook Pro takes both 110 and 240v automatically.

Thing is with food mixers I really don't think they're expecting you to be travelling around with them, so a US model will be 110v only. You therefore have to get a transfomer to provide the converted supply, or yes it will probably 'blow-up' on you.

p.s. Edit to add...
http://www.threedoubleyou.com/convertpower.htm
There is some general useful info on this site, though I have to say the prices look expensive to me, as I previously (10+ years ago) bought a 240<>110v 2(?)kw up/down converter for about £50. They are certainly cheaper in the US too...



User avatar
Mi Amigo
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1791
Joined: Sat, 19 Jun 2004
Location: Kinto Pino

Postby Mi Amigo » Sun, 25 Mar 2012 4:36 pm

To follow on from JR8's comments above, anything capable of working with 110V or 230V (either by a switch, or automatically, as with many AC adapters for phones, laptops, etc.) will work without much fuss here. Worst case scenario is that you have change the plug / cord, or use a plug adapter. Step 1 is to look for a label or imprinted text on the device itself - it should indicate what voltage(s) the item is rated at.

For items that are only designed to work on 110V, personally I wouldn't bother bringing them. You would need to buy a transformer of adequate power rating to use them, and those of reasonable quality are not cheap. Furthermore, aside from the voltage difference, there's also a difference in line frequency (60 Hz in USA, 50 Hz in Singapore) that may adversely affect anything with a motor in it.
Be careful what you wish for

User avatar
zzm9980
Governor
Governor
Posts: 6842
Joined: Wed, 06 Jul 2011
Location: Once more unto the breach

Postby zzm9980 » Mon, 26 Mar 2012 11:08 am

I've also had electronics burn out even with pricey voltage convertors. One was a cordless phone. It took a few months, but it was hardly drawing a heavy load either.


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “Relocating, Moving to Singapore”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests