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Renounce Singapore Citizenship

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Re: Ns

Postby Mad Scientist » Thu, 13 May 2010 6:05 pm

terrie35 wrote:He has already renounced his singapore citizenship at an embassy and received a letter saying that he ceased to be citizen of singapore, a few years ago. So will it be safe for him to visit old relatives in singapore? From your reply, it seems it is fine for him, right?


Yes he is all good to go. No worries about that.

My sons are the same. No problem at all

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work

Postby terrie35 » Fri, 14 May 2010 8:35 pm

Mad scientist, many thanks for your reply.

Are such people who renounced citizenship be allowed to work in singapore?

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Re: work

Postby Mad Scientist » Sat, 15 May 2010 4:36 am

terrie35 wrote:Mad scientist, many thanks for your reply.

Are such people who renounced citizenship be allowed to work in singapore?


Ah..... that is a different kettle of fish altogether

Once you or your son renounce , yes, you can visit as a social visitor. Conduct or attend a meeting as long as no money changes hands
Other than that all cards are off the table.
No work, stay as PR , set up business none at all . Even if you wish to return to serve the National Service will be denied. It is a one way street.

It is stated very clearly on the renunciation paper when the applicant signed it.
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ex-citizen

Postby terrie35 » Mon, 17 May 2010 4:10 am

Isn't it a pity that former singaporeans cannot work in singapore but foreigners can? I have come across some of these ex-singaporeans and they are talented and have string of masters etc. I think for a singaporean to excel abroad in their studies, it takes a lot of work and talent. So it is a pity that singapore doesn't want to make use of their talent, and instead hire some foreigners who may not be loyal to the country but for the monetary aspect. Don't bash me, this is just my opinion....

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Re: ex-citizen

Postby Mad Scientist » Mon, 17 May 2010 4:53 am

terrie35 wrote:Isn't it a pity that former singaporeans cannot work in singapore but foreigners can? I have come across some of these ex-singaporeans and they are talented and have string of masters etc. I think for a singaporean to excel abroad in their studies, it takes a lot of work and talent. So it is a pity that singapore doesn't want to make use of their talent, and instead hire some foreigners who may not be loyal to the country but for the monetary aspect. Don't bash me, this is just my opinion....


You are entitled to your opinion and I respect that. I am neither for nor against dual citizenship or whatever law that has been designated by SG Gahmen.
I, myself have children that relinquish SG citizenship for foreign ones. They are now studying in Cambridge and MIT respectively.
Singapore law can be perceive draconian and dictatorial in some form or manner by many but that is their right as the ruling Gahmen and there is nothing you and I can do. Either you go with the flow or jump ship.
They have their reasons and you have yours too. This immigration ruling was never going to be a marriage made in heaven.
Parents has to decide which is best for their family in term of future and education etc.
Once decided and take that choice, thick or thin , they have to stick to it as there is no way of turning the back clock.
I made that decision and I ride the wave. Sink or float that is the choice I have made.
We can lament on the loss of talent to SG or whatever but that will not change one bit on SG Gahmen standpoint.
There is no point lamenting on things that cannot be change. I suggest look for other greener pastures.
FYI Many countries recognised only Single Citizenship even USA. Not allowing those talented Ex-Sg to come back and work is to show others and would be ex-Sgers that the Gahmen do not need you but you need SG.
I am not bashing you , just stating what is there for you to see. I and many here cannot teach you on how to run foul with the law, we can only guide and advise you what the law states to the last T and how to manuevre those minefield laid.
Your parent or yourself has to make that call on which road you want to take.If you need other advise, drop a line and we see how best to help you
:) MS
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Re: ex-citizen

Postby waz » Mon, 17 May 2010 6:10 am

[quote="terrie35"]Isn't it a pity that former singaporeans cannot work in singapore but foreigners can? I have come across some of these ex-singaporeans and they are talented and have string of masters etc. I think for a singaporean to excel abroad in their studies, it takes a lot of work and talent. So it is a pity that singapore doesn't want to make use of their talent, and instead hire some foreigners who may not be loyal to the country but for the monetary aspect. Don't bash me, this is just my opinion....[/quote]


Hi Terrie35,

I do believe ex-Singaporean can work in Singapore. Just that they are treated the same as foreigner. They probably need to apply the appropriate visa depending on the work. A friend had that stint years back and worked in SG on an expat package. Technically, ex-Singaporean is also classify as not patriotic.

I don't think you can classify talent alone by their strings of masters etc. They just have the opportunity (money & time) to get those papers. What SG need are experience people - papers or not.

Cheers
I work to live and not live to work.

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Re: ex-citizen

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 17 May 2010 6:54 am

waz wrote:
I don't think you can classify talent alone by their strings of masters etc. They just have the opportunity (money & time) to get those papers. What SG need are experience people - papers or not.

Cheers


That & commitment to the country but by giving up their citizenship once, they've already shown how much commitment that they bring to the table.

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Re: ex-citizen

Postby Mad Scientist » Mon, 17 May 2010 7:29 am

waz wrote:
terrie35 wrote:I do believe ex-Singaporean can work in Singapore. Just that they are treated the same as foreigner. They probably need to apply the appropriate visa depending on the work. A friend had that stint years back and worked in SG on an expat package. Technically, ex-Singaporean is also classify as not patriotic.


On the face of it yeah technically you can work in SG but if you are ex-Sger your resume stick out like a sore thumb. Unless you have something that other foreigners do not have . Read this to enligthen you that the Gahmen micro manage EVERYTHING .

THE government looks closely at permanent residents' (PRs) contributions to Singapore before deciding which ones can become citizens, said Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew on Sunday night at a Tanjong Pagar GRC event.

'So please put up with the new immigrants. We are very careful about who becomes a citizen,' he said, responding to criticisms over the growing influx of foreigners living and working here.

There were more than 1.2million foreigners in Singapore last year.

Mr Lee said that 10per cent of the pool of foreigners here are new PRs, while another 20per cent are PRs who have been here for some time.

'This 20per cent, we will look at their performance and slowly absorb those who can help us. If they don't help us raise the level, they won't be citizens. We are not stupid.'

As for the remaining 70per cent of foreigners who are here on work permits, 'they are not citizens and never will be', he added. 'They will go home after two years. They do the difficult jobs and without them, MRT stations will not go up.


And this

Implications of Singapore Citizenship Renunciation

If you are thinking about renouncing Singapore citizenship, it is important to think of the implications of this decision. Once your declaration for renunciation is registered:

1. You will cease to be a citizen of Singapore.
2. Citizen benefits such as subsidies in health-care, education, taxation, employment and other privileges will cease to be applicable.
3. There is no provision for reinstatement.
4. There is also no assurance that you can continue to work or reside in Singapore as a foreigner on any type of employment permit or as a Permanent Resident.
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enunciation

Postby terrie35 » Wed, 09 Jun 2010 3:02 am

many thanks for all your replies.


Can anyone please tell me about the case of the famous singaporean pianist from Uk who came to singapore a few years ago? i have heard bits and pieces of the story but I am not sure of the details.. Why he was not allowed to play in Singapore when he is a Uk citizen?

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Re: enunciation

Postby Mad Scientist » Wed, 09 Jun 2010 3:59 am

terrie35 wrote:many thanks for all your replies.


Can anyone please tell me about the case of the famous singaporean pianist from Uk who came to singapore a few years ago? i have heard bits and pieces of the story but I am not sure of the details.. Why he was not allowed to play in Singapore when he is a Uk citizen?


Firstly he was allowed to play and become a judge on a piano competition in SG after he was fine by the court

Read this for more info
http://www.getforme.com/previous2006/06 ... ermits.htm
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Postby terrie35 » Thu, 10 Jun 2010 7:47 pm

Errr...maybe I am blur, but why must he pay a fine if he is a UK citizen?

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 10 Jun 2010 11:13 pm

terrie35 wrote:Errr...maybe I am blur, but why must he pay a fine if he is a UK citizen?


Yup. Blur alright!

Ever heard of Google?

http://www.getforme.com/homepage2005/ns ... ightly.htm

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Postby terrie35 » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 10:59 pm

i am not living in singapore so never thought of googling - anyway by the time i heard of the story, it was long past.
Last edited by terrie35 on Fri, 11 Jun 2010 11:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: ex-citizen

Postby terrie35 » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 11:05 pm

I can understand the govt's point of view that those who tried to get away from NS should be punished....but what about those who have one parent who is a foreigner? These kids may sometimes be brought up abroad and know nothing about singapore and renouncing their citizenship as they have to serve NS in their own country....so punishing these is not so favourable, in my opinion.

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 12 Jun 2010 12:16 am

It's still not an excuse as the Singapore parent DOES know about the NS issue. Therefore, the blame still lies with the parents. As far as them having to do NS in their own country (Singapore IS their country of birth and having been born here carries certain obligations) Those obligations can be minimized providing proper procedures are followed (we have numerou thread on how to do this in the Strictly Speaking Forum). But frankly, Singapore doesn't really care about other people's opinions. The laws are there and ignorance of the law is not an excuse. I daresay, most countries are like that.


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