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motorbike licence in singapore

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rr78
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motorbike licence in singapore

Postby rr78 » Mon, 24 Sep 2007 7:17 pm

Hi,

I was wondering if anybody knew some information on getting a motorcycle licence in singapore.

I'm a foreigner.. who doesnt already have a motorbike licence.

What's required? how long does it take?

thanks

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Strong Eagle
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Postby Strong Eagle » Mon, 24 Sep 2007 9:51 pm

If you do NOT already have a foreign license to ride motorcycles, then you will need to sign up for rider training. There are three classes of MC licenses... 2b - 200cc and less, 2a - 400 cc and less, and 2 - unlimited.

Generally, it will take you 3 to 6 months to complete the training for each class of license... that is, six months from now you could have your 2b license, provisional, and after a year, a wide open 2b. Same for the others. About the quickest you can get all the way to class 2 is 2 1/2 years.

If you are really serious about an MC license you might ought to see what it takes to get one in your home country and convert it.

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Postby sillingw » Tue, 25 Sep 2007 9:43 am

agreed, if you do not already have, try to get one at home, I drive a large bike here and found the process of converting my UK license very easy - just an easy written test, to be taken within 12 months of getting here

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Postby hagar » Tue, 25 Sep 2007 11:16 am

As per sillingw I was able to convert my Australian Bike license to an class 2 bike licence in Singapore along with my car licence on the basis of a multiple choice theory examination alomost 7 years ago. I have sinced bought 5 bikes and sold 3 (including 1 of each for my wife).

In the last few years they have become much more strict in the conversion and allow most riders to convert only to a 2B bike licence unless their overseas license states that they are licenced to ride a larger cc bike or with some negotiation you can prove you have been licensed to ride for a number of years. I know of riders of large cc bikes from Australia and Japan that were forced to start at 2B and work their way up to class two as described by Strong Eagle.

My wife has been working on her riders licence in Singapore at the AMK driving centre. She passed her 2B well over a year ago and has subsequently passed her 2A sh will go for her class 2 early next year. The process is very good although time consuming. At least riders although not very trafic aware are experienced at controlling the bike before hitting the streets where total concentation is required to avoid being his by Singapore drivers.

If your totally inexperienced at riding I suggest going through the ropes in Singapore. My wife and 2 other friends have not regretted it.

Cheers

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Postby sillingw » Tue, 25 Sep 2007 1:13 pm

At least riders although not very trafic aware are experienced at controlling the bike before hitting the streets where total concentation is required to avoid being his by Singapore drivers.


I passed my bike test in UK many, many, many years ago, but have ridden big bikes all my life - I started with the assumption that I would be OK to ride a big bike in Singapore, so I bought a BMW R1100R and rode it - after several months, applied for the written test (see above post) passed it and they gave me a licence for the car and the bike :D I can only say that my personal experience with singapore government is :- efficient, sensible, fast and easy - now I have to renew my UK passport and am dreading that experience with UK FCO again - they could learn a thing or two. Do bear in mind Hagar's advice above, the smaller the bike, the more the car drivers bully you and it is very defensive driving that is required for a bike rider in Singapore.

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Postby Superglide » Tue, 25 Sep 2007 1:44 pm

Showed my bike when converting the licence and got it...

If I may add, most of the danger on the streets here is not just from the moronic drivers in cars, but even worse are the other local bikers!
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Postby sillingw » Tue, 25 Sep 2007 2:06 pm

Superglide wrote:Showed my bike when converting the licence and got it...

If I may add, most of the danger on the streets here is not just from the moronic drivers in cars, but even worse are the other local bikers!


Oh so true :shock:

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Postby itpaystosurf » Tue, 25 Sep 2007 5:09 pm

i think only a theory test is needed to convert overseas bike lesson.. Riding Theory Test

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Postby Strong Eagle » Tue, 25 Sep 2007 6:24 pm

itpaystosurf wrote:i think only a theory test is needed to convert overseas bike lesson.. Riding Theory Test


???

The only test which is required to convert a license is the Basic Theory test... no riding test is required.

As of now, the law being changed about 3 years ago, all foreign motorcycle license conversions can only be made to class 2b.

However as I and others know, it is possible to get converted to unlimited. The following are very helpful in getting converted to a class 2 instead of 2b:

a) Be older. Older people are not as dangerous (generally) and less prone to getting themselves killed.

b) Have proof of multiple years of big bike riding experience. I've held my license for more years than the young lady processing my application was old.

c) If you have certificates, training, etc., bring copies.

d) Buy a large bike as soon as you get here. Ride it for 10 months, then covert your license. You can argue that you have been riding safely for 10 months and ask for an upgrade.

I think the point is to keep newly transplanted 19 year olds from buying a Hayabusa and promptly killing themselves or others.

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Postby Strong Eagle » Tue, 25 Sep 2007 6:31 pm

Superglide wrote:Showed my bike when converting the licence and got it...

If I may add, most of the danger on the streets here is not just from the moronic drivers in cars, but even worse are the other local bikers!


Actually, I think that Singapore is a lot safer than many other places I have ridden. You take your life into your hands in KL or Bangkok, and in KL in particular, the bikers are maniacs.

The drivers in Greece are maniacs, all pushing for that last microsecond of advantage. South Africa not so bad except that everyone goes so fast. Taxis on Batam are truly notorious, running up on curbs or onto the grass to gain an advantage and bikers are invisible.

Traffic is much faster and larger in most US cities... and many drivers simply are aggressive... try to lane split and some clown would open his door just because you would get in front of him.

Singapore is generally easy to drive... slower speeds and a better awareness of bikers... and more training. There are three things to watch out for:

a) Goods vehicle drivers - truly bad in all respects and the majority seem not to know how to drive.

b) Taxis - Generally a good bunch but a small minority of idiots.

c) Big Beemers, Mercedes, Lexus - true a$$holes who think that the inflated price they paid for their car bought them the road as well.

Out of all the cities of any size that I have ridden in, Singapore is the most biker friendly. Having said that, I still follow my rules:

a) Every cage driver is a moron and blind.
b) Every one of them is out to get me.
c) None of them have ever learned to drive.

Keeps me safe.

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Postby sillingw » Tue, 25 Sep 2007 8:39 pm

Strong Eagle wrote:
Superglide wrote:Showed my bike when converting the licence and got it...

me too, having already ridden for some 9 months

If I may add, most of the danger on the streets here is not just from the moronic drivers in cars, but even worse are the other local bikers!


ageed - my perception (really bad to stereotype I know) malaysian day workers - and this is bec ause I woir in KL every month (not drive because I dare not)

Actually, I think that Singapore is a lot safer than many other places I have ridden. You take your life into your hands in KL or Bangkok, and in KL in particular, the bikers are maniacs.

but not San Francisco, London or many other places I have ridden - i still think more education is needed here before I can ride with real confidence instead of defensive driving.

The drivers in Greece are maniacs, all pushing for that last microsecond of advantage. South Africa not so bad except that everyone goes so fast. Taxis on Batam are truly notorious, running up on curbs or onto the grass to gain an advantage and bikers are invisible.

have lived in South Africa (Germiston) for five years - here is worse - KL even worse than here - BKK even worse - anywhere in China - worst of the lot, I will not drive there, just rent a taxi and prey (pray) maybe india is worse, but close (Greece - is as a cruise)

Traffic is much faster and larger in most US cities... and many drivers simply are aggressive... try to lane split and some clown would open his door just because you would get in front of him.

lived in US for 12 years, Boston and San Francisco - rode big bikes and Cars - never an issue, asia still has a lot to learn in my opinion, I prefer living here, but not drivingg here.

Singapore is generally easy to drive... slower speeds and a better awareness of bikers... and more training. There are three things to watch out for:

No ffff ing way but I'll read the three: :P

a) Goods vehicle drivers - truly bad in all respects and the majority seem not to know how to drive.

stereotyping, but agreed (mostly) have come across some that are OK

b) Taxis - Generally a good bunch but a small minority of idiots.

I come acoss the bunch all the time, so my opinion is lower - Taxi drivers = selfish = do not care = do as I want and you avoid - one moment of inattention = possible death

c) Big Beemers, Mercedes, Lexus - true a$$holes who think that the inflated price they paid for their car bought them the road as well.

I have a big Bmw as well, amd I respect Bikers so we are not all the same, but I dop agree - mostly, especially Mercedes, especially black, especially female drivers - comments anyone ?????

Out of all the cities of any size that I have ridden in, Singapore is the most biker friendly. Having said that, I still follow my rules:

Nope - no way, not on any day - how many cities have you ridden in??????????

a) Every cage driver is a moron and blind.

defensive riding - mandatory in Singapore

b) Every one of them is out to get me.

defensive riding - mandatory in Singapore

c) None of them have ever learned to drive.

defensive riding - mandatory in Singapore

Keeps me safe.


me too :lol:

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try accessing the following website

Postby leeds_lass » Tue, 25 Sep 2007 10:12 pm

hey RR78,

I'm in a simialr situation to you, with no licence to convert but I started my bike lessons about 4 weeks ago.

Try the following website for info on what needs doing, and in what order.


www.bbdc.com.sg

It's simple - you just need to register with a driving school, and normally that involves a one off payment fee that gives you membership for a year about $50 or so if memory serves me.

If you have never had a licence, as the previous guys mentioned, you can only do 2b lessons. It involves practical and theory - practical are about 18-25$ a time and theory about 8$ a time.

If you have any other questions, just pm me and I'll help as much as I can. I do recommend it though - I um'ed and ah'ed for a while and wish i had started earlier. happy biking....

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Postby Superglide » Wed, 26 Sep 2007 9:42 am

Strong Eagle wrote:
Superglide wrote:Showed my bike when converting the licence and got it...

If I may add, most of the danger on the streets here is not just from the moronic drivers in cars, but even worse are the other local bikers!


Actually, I think that Singapore is a lot safer than many other places I have ridden. You take your life into your hands in KL or Bangkok, and in KL in particular, the bikers are maniacs.

The drivers in Greece are maniacs


SE, I wasn't so much ranting on Singaporeans as such, but trying to point out that the danger on the roads here in Singapore imho comes from those local and Malaysian morons on small bikes, who are so completely brainless, squeezing in between me and a car at speeds around 90 km/hr, even when there is no space.

I am sure you have experienced the same, the so called white line riders here.

Call me racist, xenofobic or whatever for that, but I experience it on a daily basis, every single time I go out on the roads.

Foolish cardrivers, no problem, I can anticipate, I am much more agile and faster if needed. But these mosquito type of idiots described, you just don't see them coming all the time and to be honest: the deathrate amongst them frigging idiot local bikers here is damn high, but still too many of them survive.

And it helps me in no way to realize that in Greece they are worse. I spend my days on the roads here in Singapore, not in Athens. :wink:
If only we could pull out our brain and use only our eyes.

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Postby Strong Eagle » Wed, 26 Sep 2007 10:02 am

Superglide wrote:SE, I wasn't so much ranting on Singaporeans as such, but trying to point out that the danger on the roads here in Singapore imho comes from those local and Malaysian morons on small bikes, who are so completely brainless, squeezing in between me and a car at speeds around 90 km/hr, even when there is no space.


I tend to agree. If you see a bike with JB plates around here you can just about bet they will be doing something idiotic. And yes, they are a danger to responsible bike riders... cages just run over them... but they create very hazardous situations for responsible bikers.

And what is amazingly stupid is that they lane split in moving traffic, leaving no roon for error, only to end up at the next red light like everyone else... you'd think they'd learn.

They are just as bad, if not worse in KL... no respect for any other biker.

When I see one of them coming up behind me I try to block them from getting by.

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IMPORTANT POINT

Postby Patrick777 » Wed, 26 Sep 2007 11:17 pm

I've just passed my basic theory to convert my UK bike license ...

Because of smart Expats they now ONLY CONVERT LICENSES where the rider or car has HELD the license AT LEAST 6 MONTHS PRIOR to landing in Singapore ...

So you can no longer hop back and pass you license and then convert ...

Sorry it was pretty important for me as my wife only passed it about 12 months prior


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