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The reality of being an SQ GAL

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redhead
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Postby redhead » Fri, 15 Aug 2008 12:07 pm

Everything you've just said was right and real!

I have a friend from another airline which was also based here in singapore, and she was zapped by the seniors.. should i say not too senior because the crew who zapped her was only in the industry for 1 to 1.5 yrs. and my friend told me she was scolded so many times by those ugly crews acting like so perfect and on her first Supernumerary flight my friend was zapped by the crews. asking her questions which she didn't even know or never heard as if she can answer, my god! that was her first step in the aircraft and ask her things and why she don't even know. to my surprise that the crew who zapped her was not even one of the teamleaders. I told my friend to not to show she is nervous infront of them bec some crew would bully her more, for my opinion senior crews are just insecure of the new girls that's why they keep on zapping other new crew.

JadeiteJade
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Postby JadeiteJade » Sun, 17 Aug 2008 1:09 am

yah.those zappy crews r usually those that have been flying for 1-1.5 yrs.they thought they r very senior.PUI. :cool:

infinit
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Postby infinit » Tue, 26 Aug 2008 10:54 am

As harsh as the experience may be for new cabin crew, remember that you're working for the best airline. At a time where domestic flights were what most people could barely afford, this newcomer that just broke out of Malayan Airlines had no domestic routes to fly (Changi-Tengah Airbase anyone?), didn't have money and faced colossial competition. But this airline fought hard and grew so strong its the second most profittable airline behind the American-based Southwest Airlines which has a low-cost advantage. And if you ask anyone which airline's the best, chances are this one comes to mind. Qatar, Emirates and perhaps Cathay Pacific are strong competitors but the image of a graceful SQ Girl, with her timeless charm and apt for customer service clad in her kebaya knocks off the competition easily.

They've got real high standards to maintain. You're talking about working with what is quite clearly the best airline for the past 30 years. You'll have to accept that your seniors are going to have extremely high standards of you (and they should have even higher standards for themselves).

Zapping- teaching juniors or simply breaking them down? Maybe its both. I'm doing my National Service. Not with the military though, I'm with Ministry of Home Affairs (okay, its easy to guess where I'm doing my NS with) but in the military and even in here this is common. When you come in as a recruit, sure you get scolded and punished when you make mistakes but it goes beyond that. Everyone comes in with different mindsets, the whole system of being strict is meant to melt you down and mould you into the "model" soldier or staff that performs his duties with his best effort, with consistency and is a good representative of his organisation.

So that's what it is. Don't take it to heart, just take it as en experience and get better each time. I make it sound too easy don't I? Well I can say I've gone through something similar if not tougher when I was newly enlisted into NS. Think of it that way- you're a Recruit. You will have to face all this before you can go up to the next rank. So rather than let it affect you, listen to what they say and work on it but dont let it affect you and bogg you down because there simply isn't anything else you can do.

Take it positively and before long you'll be out of this phase and who knows you may get some really nice experiences and surprises along the way.


I initially planned to go to uni when I finish my NS. I considered joining SQ as cabin crew and doing a degree part time. I'll only join SQ since its my favorite airline. Dont think I'll do it though hehe

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queenie-me
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Postby queenie-me » Tue, 26 Aug 2008 6:42 pm

infinit wrote:As harsh as the experience may be for new cabin crew, remember that you're working for the best airline. At a time where domestic flights were what most people could barely afford, this newcomer that just broke out of Malayan Airlines had no domestic routes to fly (Changi-Tengah Airbase anyone?), didn't have money and faced colossial competition. But this airline fought hard and grew so strong its the second most profittable airline behind the American-based Southwest Airlines which has a low-cost advantage. And if you ask anyone which airline's the best, chances are this one comes to mind. Qatar, Emirates and perhaps Cathay Pacific are strong competitors but the image of a graceful SQ Girl, with her timeless charm and apt for customer service clad in her kebaya knocks off the competition easily.

They've got real high standards to maintain. You're talking about working with what is quite clearly the best airline for the past 30 years. You'll have to accept that your seniors are going to have extremely high standards of you (and they should have even higher standards for themselves).

Zapping- teaching juniors or simply breaking them down? Maybe its both. I'm doing my National Service. Not with the military though, I'm with Ministry of Home Affairs (okay, its easy to guess where I'm doing my NS with) but in the military and even in here this is common. When you come in as a recruit, sure you get scolded and punished when you make mistakes but it goes beyond that. Everyone comes in with different mindsets, the whole system of being strict is meant to melt you down and mould you into the "model" soldier or staff that performs his duties with his best effort, with consistency and is a good representative of his organisation.

So that's what it is. Don't take it to heart, just take it as en experience and get better each time. I make it sound too easy don't I? Well I can say I've gone through something similar if not tougher when I was newly enlisted into NS. Think of it that way- you're a Recruit. You will have to face all this before you can go up to the next rank. So rather than let it affect you, listen to what they say and work on it but dont let it affect you and bogg you down because there simply isn't anything else you can do.

Take it positively and before long you'll be out of this phase and who knows you may get some really nice experiences and surprises along the way.



Spoken from a non-crew.
It's just better said than done.

I would say, wait till you feel it. Till then, not many people will understand how the crew felt when they were being zapped.

Yup, moulding into "models" as you said. In my point, zapping another crew, will only mould them into another zapping crew. - If you get what I meant. You may use that in the NS system. But being a cabin crew is a totally different experience.

I came from a Singapore based airline. But when I joined another airline outside based. The culture is so different. There isn't any senior-junior [culture]. Everyone is happy during flight, the seniors will join in the fun to make the flight enjoyable. We don't get zapped etc. We work happily and everyone had a great flight at the end of the day. Even on my first few flights, when I still don't get things right, they did not even zap, throw faces at me. In fact, they taught me the right way on how it should be done.

Think about it, if you did get zapped, do you think everyone else have a happy ending flight? Imagine on your layover? All alone in the hotel room couldn't speak to anyone else except yourself with the walls. Maybe it isn't that bad if you have 1 or 2 nice crew who might take you out.

Here's the different being in NS and a crew:
NS: $400-600 [under government]
Crew: $2000-7000

We work so hard under pressure with the passenger, do you think we need other pressure from colleagues?

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Strong Eagle
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Postby Strong Eagle » Tue, 26 Aug 2008 9:30 pm

infinit wrote:As harsh as the experience may be for new cabin crew, remember that you're working for the best airline. At a time where domestic flights were what most people could barely afford, this newcomer that just broke out of Malayan Airlines had no domestic routes to fly (Changi-Tengah Airbase anyone?), didn't have money and faced colossial competition. But this airline fought hard and grew so strong its the second most profittable airline behind the American-based Southwest Airlines which has a low-cost advantage. And if you ask anyone which airline's the best, chances are this one comes to mind. Qatar, Emirates and perhaps Cathay Pacific are strong competitors but the image of a graceful SQ Girl, with her timeless charm and apt for customer service clad in her kebaya knocks off the competition easily.

They've got real high standards to maintain. You're talking about working with what is quite clearly the best airline for the past 30 years. You'll have to accept that your seniors are going to have extremely high standards of you (and they should have even higher standards for themselves).

Zapping- teaching juniors or simply breaking them down? Maybe its both. I'm doing my National Service. Not with the military though, I'm with Ministry of Home Affairs (okay, its easy to guess where I'm doing my NS with) but in the military and even in here this is common. When you come in as a recruit, sure you get scolded and punished when you make mistakes but it goes beyond that. Everyone comes in with different mindsets, the whole system of being strict is meant to melt you down and mould you into the "model" soldier or staff that performs his duties with his best effort, with consistency and is a good representative of his organisation.

So that's what it is. Don't take it to heart, just take it as en experience and get better each time. I make it sound too easy don't I? Well I can say I've gone through something similar if not tougher when I was newly enlisted into NS. Think of it that way- you're a Recruit. You will have to face all this before you can go up to the next rank. So rather than let it affect you, listen to what they say and work on it but dont let it affect you and bogg you down because there simply isn't anything else you can do.

Take it positively and before long you'll be out of this phase and who knows you may get some really nice experiences and surprises along the way.


I initially planned to go to uni when I finish my NS. I considered joining SQ as cabin crew and doing a degree part time. I'll only join SQ since its my favorite airline. Dont think I'll do it though hehe


You know what the problem is with this view? It assumes that supervisors need to be *ssholes in order to get anything done.

I'm an expat. One thing I've noticed in Asia is the lack of enlightened management practice. Guess what? You don't need to beat up on people to achieve maximum creativity, productivity, and effort. You just need to give them incentive.

All this post tells me (and others) that there are a lot of insecure, ego-tripping, self aggrandizing people who make it to cabin crew who thing lording over the juniors is good, when in reality it shows nothing more than a character defect.

Cheers.

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Postby Plavt » Tue, 26 Aug 2008 9:54 pm

infinit wrote: but the image of a graceful SQ Girl, with her timeless charm and apt for customer service clad in her kebaya knocks off the competition easily.


Not entirely true, the airline has good reputation but competition is or can be stiff from budget airlines who charge lower fares over short distances.

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Postby infinit » Tue, 26 Aug 2008 11:27 pm

Strong Eagle wrote:
infinit wrote:As harsh as the experience may be for new cabin crew, remember that you're working for the best airline. At a time where domestic flights were what most people could barely afford, this newcomer that just broke out of Malayan Airlines had no domestic routes to fly (Changi-Tengah Airbase anyone?), didn't have money and faced colossial competition. But this airline fought hard and grew so strong its the second most profittable airline behind the American-based Southwest Airlines which has a low-cost advantage. And if you ask anyone which airline's the best, chances are this one comes to mind. Qatar, Emirates and perhaps Cathay Pacific are strong competitors but the image of a graceful SQ Girl, with her timeless charm and apt for customer service clad in her kebaya knocks off the competition easily.

They've got real high standards to maintain. You're talking about working with what is quite clearly the best airline for the past 30 years. You'll have to accept that your seniors are going to have extremely high standards of you (and they should have even higher standards for themselves).

Zapping- teaching juniors or simply breaking them down? Maybe its both. I'm doing my National Service. Not with the military though, I'm with Ministry of Home Affairs (okay, its easy to guess where I'm doing my NS with) but in the military and even in here this is common. When you come in as a recruit, sure you get scolded and punished when you make mistakes but it goes beyond that. Everyone comes in with different mindsets, the whole system of being strict is meant to melt you down and mould you into the "model" soldier or staff that performs his duties with his best effort, with consistency and is a good representative of his organisation.

So that's what it is. Don't take it to heart, just take it as en experience and get better each time. I make it sound too easy don't I? Well I can say I've gone through something similar if not tougher when I was newly enlisted into NS. Think of it that way- you're a Recruit. You will have to face all this before you can go up to the next rank. So rather than let it affect you, listen to what they say and work on it but dont let it affect you and bogg you down because there simply isn't anything else you can do.

Take it positively and before long you'll be out of this phase and who knows you may get some really nice experiences and surprises along the way.


I initially planned to go to uni when I finish my NS. I considered joining SQ as cabin crew and doing a degree part time. I'll only join SQ since its my favorite airline. Dont think I'll do it though hehe


You know what the problem is with this view? It assumes that supervisors need to be *ssholes in order to get anything done.

I'm an expat. One thing I've noticed in Asia is the lack of enlightened management practice. Guess what? You don't need to beat up on people to achieve maximum creativity, productivity, and effort. You just need to give them incentive.

All this post tells me (and others) that there are a lot of insecure, ego-tripping, self aggrandizing people who make it to cabin crew who thing lording over the juniors is good, when in reality it shows nothing more than a character defect.

Cheers.


Firstly most other Singaporean companies aren't very hierarchical. If you've worked in one you'd know. SQ is probably an exception. Singaporeans aren't like the Japanese where seniority is everything everywhere.

No, that's not my point. Its not about being an insecure maniac of an asshole who just picks on someone new simply because they're new.. All in their ruthless sadistic quest to show them who's the boss.

Its more of you're lacking something, you still dont realise it, our organisation doesn't tolerate any substandards so you get screwed. Actually it may not even be an Asian concept like Strong Eagle suggested. It sounds like something that came from the British colonnial times. My grandfather was with the Police Force during the British days. You're kept on your toes. Oh boy, they'd storm into your office and you're doomed if there's something as trivial as dust on top of your shelves.

Its like that in the military. I doubt they'd be anywhere as strict on American Airlines or Delta (yes I just had to use an American carrier:D) but look at the standards on them. Its so atrocious I avoid them like the plague! Well unless I'm flying domestic in the states of course where I have no choice.

Plavt: Duh! I'm talking about comparing SQ to other premium arilines. You cant compare SQ to a budget airline as that's not a fair competition. Compare apples with apples lah


Well I'm just offering a possible explanation for why things are the way with SQ. Like you said, I'm not with SQ but this is how it seems to me. I compare SQ to being with the military in those aspects I mentioned.

Screw your subordinates when they go wrong or offer them incentives to improve instead? I won't go into that discussion, my point was merely to attempt to provide an explanation why supervisors in SQ clamp down hard on their subordinates as the thread's starter claims :)

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Postby Plavt » Wed, 27 Aug 2008 1:01 am

infinit wrote:
Plavt: Duh! I'm talking about comparing SQ to other premium arilines. You cant compare SQ to a budget airline as that's not a fair competition. Compare apples with apples lah



Well you didn''t state that and in case you haven't noticed there are destinations to which both SIA and budget airlines fly to so they therefore compete with each other! :roll:

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Postby Plavt » Wed, 27 Aug 2008 1:18 am

infinit wrote:
Its more of you're lacking something, you still dont realise it, our organisation doesn't tolerate any substandards so you get screwed.


This is nothing more than mere 'claptrap' when you are new to job or an environment or job you learn which needs co-operation and encouragement not constant belittlement and chastisement. They may like to do that in the armed forces but in civy street people are entitled to treated with some respect.

Actually it may not even be an Asian concept like Strong Eagle suggested. It sounds like something that came from the British colonnial times. My grandfather was with the Police Force during the British days. You're kept on your toes. Oh boy, they'd storm into your office and you're doomed if there's something as trivial as dust on top of your shelves.


Big deal! That was a long time ago the country is indepenent and has its own administration (good grief do I have to sate the obvious?) Since Strong Eagle runs his own company in Singapore and deals with local managers amongst others there is little doubt there is substance in what he says.

Should you care to read around a few forums and blogs you would find some information that tells you your whole view of SQ is totally misconstrued. The airline and the military are two entirely different concepts. I think you are a bit 'far-gone' with your NS. :roll:

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Postby infinit » Wed, 27 Aug 2008 11:43 am

Plavt, I've mentioned clearly that I was merely trying to provide an explanation for why the airline treats its new employees such, not to justify, or provide an alternative solution to them.

You have not provided any explanation of your own despite stating that my theory is misconstrued.

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Postby Plavt » Wed, 27 Aug 2008 11:49 am

infinit wrote:Plavt, I've mentioned clearly that I was merely trying to provide an explanation for why the airline treats its new employees such, not to justify, or provide an alternative solution to them.



I didin't need to provide an explanation, Strong Eagle provided it, you simply put forward your imputation which is wrong. I have worked in several different companies and either seen or endured the same thing!

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Postby Punkman » Fri, 29 Aug 2008 1:43 pm

sometimes teaching can be seem as zapping, reminders taken as nagging. I think one has to except that being new, no one is expected to know everything. Take it as a learning experience.

Take gordon ramsey for example. Marco Pierre white made him cry, look where he is today. And he is grateful for what his mentor did for him. sometimes the toughest words helps us to remember better. There should be a balance.

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Postby Vortex » Fri, 05 Sep 2008 7:08 pm

hi fellas...

read in the papers today bout the SQ gal got raped by her senior steward in Abu Dhabi....read that he entered the rm which is opened by hotel staff...pity the gal...must be traumatic now...
Anyway hope the guy got his balls chopped...for taking advantage of the poor gal...
Don't just dream,... Live it!!!! It's only 36 000 ft....

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Postby Plavt » Fri, 05 Sep 2008 7:32 pm

Vortex wrote:Anyway hope the guy got his balls chopped...for taking advantage of the poor gal...


He may get more than that, rape can carry the death penalty in the UAE. Let's hope the victim gets all the help she needs and can recover properly, things like this really make me sick. :x
Last edited by Plavt on Fri, 05 Sep 2008 7:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.

chichi14
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Postby chichi14 » Fri, 05 Sep 2008 7:34 pm

Punkman wrote:sometimes teaching can be seem as zapping, reminders taken as nagging. I think one has to except that being new, no one is expected to know everything. Take it as a learning experience.

Take gordon ramsey for example. Marco Pierre white made him cry, look where he is today. And he is grateful for what his mentor did for him. sometimes the toughest words helps us to remember better. There should be a balance.


ditto.

Even in any job not just in airline industry, most of the newbies will go thru the same dilemma and more often than not, they will take it personally. Getting lectured, getting nagged if you've done something wrong, reminders and all that are just part of it. Just take it as your learning experience and as soon as you get the hang of it, everything will go smoothly for you.
Last edited by chichi14 on Sat, 27 Sep 2008 9:31 am, edited 2 times in total.


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