Singapore Expats Forum

Looking for fresh beef

Discuss your views about Singapore business & economy, current policies & issues, starting a business in Singapore.
User avatar
Barczar
Chatter
Chatter
Posts: 197
Joined: Wed, 22 Jun 2005
Location: Singapore

Postby Barczar » Sat, 31 Mar 2007 11:55 pm

Fresh Meat for Beef Balls? Now having grown up on a large ranch with a proud ranching, and farming heritage my version of beef balls only comes around once a year...usually in the Spring. Good ol Prarie Oysters available during the branding and castrating season. Now there is nothing quite like fresh beef balls, but any camp cook will tell you that you can eat em after they've been chilled or frozen too, they still taste the same no matter how you store them!

I have two ways of eating beef, the first is to cut a slice off the ass end and ride the rest home...the second is to knock the horns off, wipe its' ass and put it on the plate...that's about as fresh as you get cowboy!

There is no way you can honestly tell me that the meat I get at Espiritos Santos or the Swiss Butcher that has been chilled (or in some cases frozen) tastes "worse" than any kind of beef ball you can make with "fresh meat!" Ask any meat eater...

But then again, what do I know? If you can prove that your "fresh meat" beef balls taste better, then "chef" you've got yourself a customer!
If you want to play with the Big Dogs you can't pee like a Puppy!

earthfriendly
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1832
Joined: Sat, 20 Aug 2005

Postby earthfriendly » Sun, 01 Apr 2007 1:35 am

I always thought dishes that use ground beef like meatball, humburger and meatloaf is the best way to use up lesser quality meat. Once ground up, it is hard to tell what goes into it . And it may not always be meat in it :o .

Do keep me posted once you have your buisness set up. I am interested in food prepared by chef who takes such great care in his dishes.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34262
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sun, 01 Apr 2007 11:56 am

Hey EF, Considering the expense he's going to have to go through to get it, I wouldn't be surprised at the COST as well. Better off reopening the closed wagu burger restuarant ($109 for essentially a hamburger with fungus on it!)

:P

Oh and don't even ask what goes into a hotdog! :shock:

User avatar
Asian_Geekette
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 558
Joined: Wed, 10 Jan 2007
Location: Still based in Singapore but wanders around...

Postby Asian_Geekette » Sun, 01 Apr 2007 12:21 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:Hey EF, Considering the expense he's going to have to go through to get it, I wouldn't be surprised at the COST as well. Better off reopening the closed wagu burger restuarant ($109 for essentially a hamburger with fungus on it!)

:P

Oh and don't even ask what goes into a hotdog! :shock:


sms,

Hamburger with fungus??? Or do you mean hamburger with mushroom?

About hotdogs... there's the story going around about cultured worms being put into hotdogs. Though I'm not sure if it's an urban legend or what.

I find the discussion here to be quite interesting and amusing at the same time. About fresh vs chilled beef and the thing about cow balls. I mean beef balls. :D

Cheers,
A_G
My business is not to remake myself, but make the absolute best out of what God made. -Robert Browning

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34262
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sun, 01 Apr 2007 1:40 pm

Asian_Geekette wrote:Hamburger with fungus??? Or do you mean hamburger with mushroom?

I find the discussion here to be quite interesting and amusing at the same time. About fresh vs chilled beef and the thing about cow balls. I mean beef balls. :D

Cheers,
A_G


I really meant fungus. Or should that be fungi? Of course mushrooms are a type of fungus as well but we would have to use mushrooms that are found near cows wouldn't we? That would have to be Psilocybin mushrooms otherwise known as Magic Mushrooms (usually found growing on cow flops!) That way you wouldn't care about the prices :wink:

The wagu burger came with a topping of truffles if I'm not mistaken. Truffles without the fancy name is a fungus that is found growing underground and pigs are used to locate them (fondness for them) but you have to be quick as the pigs will also eat them when they find them. Good Truffles are Expensive

Now there is a unique dish for our OP: Prairie Oysters and truffles! :o

Of course followed by a nice vintage Ice Kachang and local Kopi :cool:

earthfriendly
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1832
Joined: Sat, 20 Aug 2005

Postby earthfriendly » Mon, 02 Apr 2007 1:38 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:Better off reopening the closed wagu burger restuarant ($109 for essentially a hamburger with fungus on it!)


Wow, what a price to pay for a hamburger :o . And humburger supposed to be a quick and affordable meal. Can one really tell it is wagyu beef once ground up?

User avatar
Asian_Geekette
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 558
Joined: Wed, 10 Jan 2007
Location: Still based in Singapore but wanders around...

Postby Asian_Geekette » Mon, 02 Apr 2007 10:44 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:The wagu burger came with a topping of truffles if I'm not mistaken.
Now there is a unique dish for our OP: Prairie Oysters and truffles! :o

Of course followed by a nice vintage Ice Kachang and local Kopi :cool:


Thanks for clarifying sms. With truffles, of course price will be quite expensive since truffles are difficult to find.

I searched for prairie oysters in google. In my home country, those things are made into soup # 5 (name of the dish). It's supposed to be an aphrodisiac. :D :P
My business is not to remake myself, but make the absolute best out of what God made. -Robert Browning

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34262
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 02 Apr 2007 3:36 pm

Just in case you all are adventurous here's a recipe for Mountain/Prairie Oysters:

Rocky Mountain Oysters Recipe

2 pounds calf testicles*
2 cups beer
2 eggs, beaten
1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
¼ cup yellow cornmea1
Salt and ground black pepper to taste
Vegetable oil**
1 tablespoon hot pepper sauce

* Be sure to ask your butcher for calf testicles, not bull testicles. Calf testicles are the size of a walnut and are much more tender than the larger bull testicles.

** Use enough vegetable oil to fill your frying container halfway to the top (to allow for bubbling up and splattering) and to completely cover calf testicles while frying.

With a very sharp knife, split the tough skin-like muscle that surrounds each testicle. Remove the skin (you can remove the skin easily if the testicles are frozen, then peel while thawing). Slice each testicle into approximately ¼- to ½- inch-thick ovals. Place slices in a large pan or blow with enough beer to cover them; cover and let sit 2 hours.

In a shallow bowl, combine eggs, flour, cornmeal, salt, and pepper. Remove testicles from beer; drain and dredge thoroughly in the flour mixture. In a large, deep pot, heat oil to 375 degrees F. Deep fry 3 minutes or until golden brown (will rise to the surface when done). Drain on paper towels. Serve warm with your favorite hot pepper sauce.


My eyes were watering as I read the part with the very sharp knife!
:o

:cool:

User avatar
Asian_Geekette
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 558
Joined: Wed, 10 Jan 2007
Location: Still based in Singapore but wanders around...

Postby Asian_Geekette » Mon, 02 Apr 2007 11:13 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:Just in case you all are adventurous here's a recipe for Mountain/Prairie Oysters:



Thanks for posting the recipe sms. I was just wondering... won't this be a lil bit tough? Would beer make it a bit tender?

And won't it be a bit expensive to make... after all, there's only a pair per calf.

Just wondering...
My business is not to remake myself, but make the absolute best out of what God made. -Robert Browning

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34262
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 03 Apr 2007 10:12 am

Aside from beef steer ranchers, I doubt if there is a large calling for them. At least comparative to the amount of "normal" beef that is consumed. As long as people like to eat veal, then there will be ample supply of Calf's testicles. I reckon that they aren't too expensive as they probably end up in beef hotdogs if not purchased in pairs! :P


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “Business in Singapore”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests