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Static IPs

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Cheekybeek
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Static IPs

Postby Cheekybeek » Fri, 26 May 2006 10:45 pm

I've manually configured my IP address so that it is static. I am on Starhub and occasionally have conflict with someone else using 'my' IP. Is it a bad idea to continue with a static IP? Is there anyway to avoid IP conflicts?

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Jedi
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Postby Jedi » Sat, 27 May 2006 12:29 am

Are you running a local network (eg. wireless?). I'm fairly sure you are, so your static IP only applies to your local network. Your cable modem will have a different IP address, which Starhub automatically assigns to you. You would only have Static IP address conflicts if someone else on your network is using the same IP as you - if you're not expecting anyone else on your network then you need to look at securing your net.

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Postby Cheekybeek » Sat, 27 May 2006 9:24 am

Ok thanks.

That makes sense considering I was getting no speed with my connection.

Looking into securing it now.

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Postby Cheekybeek » Sat, 27 May 2006 10:00 am

Ok one more question:

Do I use the WPA Pre-shared key? Sorry really new to wireless broadband...

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Postby Cheekybeek » Sat, 27 May 2006 10:14 am

I did the above. All is good.

Why don't they just ask secure network Y/N

Password?

Instead of asking all the encryption options blah blah. And who is going to have a 64 character password! :???:

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Postby Strong Eagle » Sat, 27 May 2006 10:36 am

You probably don't want to use the WPA pre shared key. This is a more secure encryption system as the encryption key changes with each transmission. However, unlike large corporations with large ecommerce websites, you probably won't be the target of hackers (one large company gets more than 30,000 attempts to break in each day). You are mostly interested in making sure that your neighbors don't use your wireless router.

WEP encryption solves this. 64 bit is OK, 128 bit, better. Notice that is not 64 characters but 64 bits. Each ascii charcter, like 'A' takes 8 bits so you would need 8 characters to form a 64 bit pass phrase. Or, it takes 16 hexadecimal characters such as 0A 2B 43 5D 11 9E 3E 5F to set the key.

As for the password on the router... it is kind of pointless. You are the only one with physical access to the router, and if someone else did have access, they could just reset the whole thing anyway. The default for most routers is that they can only be programmed from a hardwire connection. Do not allow your router to be programmed from a wireless connection.

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Postby Cheekybeek » Sat, 27 May 2006 10:53 am

Whats a passphrase? Is this just my password? and wtf is hexidecimal format?

It says speed will be sacrificed at 128 bit, to what extent?

why can't they just speak english???? :???:

Thanks for your help SE and Jedi.

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Postby bigfilsing » Sat, 27 May 2006 11:23 am

As far as i know the only service provider offering static IP
s to home users is magix ( singtel). Can be usefull if you want to host games or run a webserver or similar.

From the sound of things you are running a wireless network and somebody is trying to access your netowrk from outside.
The reason you have the option to make it secure is that maybe you want to give free access to all wireless users within range. Office, bar etc.
64 bit encryption is safe enough ( as apposed to 128) and it's highly unlikely somebody will hack into that. A password is just to verify you as a user. And it's easier to change in the future if think your network is being compromised.
Leaving your wireless network is basically allowing anybody within range to use your internet connection. ( bad news if you are on a limited plan)
I can pick up 6 networks in my condo, 2 of which are unsecured. In principle i can surf the web etc for free on their network!

Good luck

PS hexadecimal is a 16 base numbering system as apposed to the normal 10 base ( decimal) system we use in daily life. Hex is more suited CPU's and IC chips. Google it ! Not fun reading but you'll understand it.

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Postby Cheekybeek » Sat, 27 May 2006 2:48 pm

I'm with Starhub. I set up the static IP for port forwarding reasons through my Linksys router.

I just made an interesting discovery...

If I connect via ethernet cable direct to the router I almost double my speed. Pay for 54Mb/s but connected at 100Mb/s.

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Postby CanesFan4Life » Sat, 27 May 2006 7:06 pm

Why not just use MAC Address Filtering? Wouldn't that be sufficient to keep you home network secure?

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 27 May 2006 7:40 pm

CanesFan4Life wrote:Why not just use MAC Address Filtering? Wouldn't that be sufficient to keep you home network secure?


You beat me to it. This is what I use as I have one desktop, two notebooks and my dopod 900 all on my wireless (the desktop is currently hardwired as is my notebook when at my desk but not when in the hall. The Desktop will be wireless next week as well using a USB dongle for wireless. All the units use MAC addresses therefore, as each MAC address is like a fingerprint while others can see the "unsecured" network they cannot access and more importantly, there is no speed penalty. You can add or delete MAC address as needed on the router table.

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Postby Cheekybeek » Sat, 27 May 2006 8:00 pm

CanesFan4Life wrote:Why not just use MAC Address Filtering? Wouldn't that be sufficient to keep you home network secure?


Probably, but then again I have no idea what it is or how to do it, just set up the thing with the password as SE suggested. Don't feel like mucking with it further.

Thanks anyhow.

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Postby Jedi » Sun, 28 May 2006 1:53 pm

MAC filtering is not that secure (and can be painful at times). The best option is using WPA, but you need to be running XP2 (assuming you're running windows). I use Pre-Shared Key, AES encryption. Choose a long, random string for your shared key.

Strong Eagle i think you are confusing WPA pre-shared key with WPA Radius, which is for Enterprise use. There is nothing wrong with using WPA pre-shared at home. WEP is well known for it's weak security.

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Postby CanesFan4Life » Sun, 28 May 2006 8:42 pm

I haven't had a problem with MAC filtering. In fact I had a guy test my network last week, and as posted earlier they could see my network but could not access. Just another option to consider.

FYI:

It is great to be able to access your network resources from anywhere in your home or office without having to plug into a wired network connection. But, if you can connect to your wireless access point from 80 feet away, then potentially every other wireless device in an 80-foot radius of your access point can as well.

There are a number of basic wireless security steps that many are already familiar with. Simple things like changing the SSID (service set identifier) from the vendor's default and disabling SSID broadcasting so you don't draw undo attention to your wireless network are a good start. Enabling some form of encryption, WEP (although it is quite flawed) or WPA, will help protect the data as it flies through the air and secure the communications between your device and the wireless router or access point.

Beyond these steps though, wireless routers or access points can generally filter access by MAC address as well. The MAC address is a unique identifier of your wireless network adapter. For a large enterprise with hundreds or thousands of wireless devices, it may not be feasible to try to maintain a listing of everyone's MAC address and constantly update the access list as users come and go. But, home offices or small to medium businesses may be able to add an extra layer of protection by filtering based on MAC address.

To determine the MAC address on a Windows system follow these steps:

1. Click Start
2. Click Run
3. Enter command (cmd) and press enter
4. In the command console, type "ipconfig /all" and press enter
5. If you have more than one network adapter, the details of each will be displayed
6. Locate the wireless adapter information
7. The MAC Address is the information labeled Physical Address

Refer to the directions for your wireless router or access point to find out how to enable MAC address filtering. Once you enable MAC address filtering and enter the MAC addresses of each of your wireless devices, the wireless router or access point will only allow those devices with MAC addresses on the access list to connect to the wireless network.

Hope this helps.

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Postby Cheekybeek » Sun, 28 May 2006 10:35 pm

Thanks for the very helpful straight forward instructions.


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