Tipping etiquette

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EADG
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Post by EADG » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 12:14 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote: It's also probably directly proportional to how good looking the girl with you is as well. :wink:
hehe...and how long you've been together

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Post by EADG » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 12:31 am

tiki wrote:Been through what you went throught EF back in the Sates.

I tip now and then if the service is good and most importantly if the service staff knows when to leave you alone and when to suggest stuff.

I tip more when I'm drunk though....

:)
ha, me too

but it's too bad the way it is in the States, in some ways you get better service, in others, a lot of attitude for poor service, and you're expected to tip in either case - I'll never forget the "Sky Captian" at Newark Airport 10 years ago, who yelled at me for not putting my bags though their gate (and then tip him) - I know, same place ten years later everyone was so polite

how amazing that some of the best service in the world is in Japan, where if you were to leave a tip, they would run after you thinking you forgot your change!

but they like here do often have those 10% service charges - when I don't see one and I like the service, like at Crazy Elephant, I tip accordingly

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Post by dot dot dot » Thu, 27 Apr 2006 5:46 pm

Being Dutch, I even recycle my toilet paper, let alone tipping.

Eric

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Post by Loops » Fri, 28 Apr 2006 11:29 pm

I don't tip in restaurants here very often, but that is a reflection on the service I'm afraid. I do tip my hairdresser though because she's good and I like her. If I went to a different hairdresser I probably wouldn't tip the first visit.

I didn't like this business of tipping for every drink in a bar when I went to the USA. I don't mind tipping there for food because the service people are usually good at their jobs and look after you, but I don't want to tip some miserable bar guy who doesn't even speak to me.

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Post by EADG » Sun, 30 Apr 2006 3:14 am

Loops wrote:I don't tip in restaurants here very often, but that is a reflection on the service I'm afraid. I do tip my hairdresser though because she's good and I like her. If I went to a different hairdresser I probably wouldn't tip the first visit.

I didn't like this business of tipping for every drink in a bar when I went to the USA. I don't mind tipping there for food because the service people are usually good at their jobs and look after you, but I don't want to tip some miserable bar guy who doesn't even speak to me.
yeah, this is an unfortunate state of affairs in the US - on one hand it promotes better service, on the other, it promotes poor service without and a lot of unwarranted expectations

I can tell you that for many Americans travelling abroad for their first times, the whole tipping thing becomes uncomfortable for those who just want to Do The Right Thing, tip the right amount, etc.

it was easy in NYC, just double the tax, elsewhere I carry a 15%/20% credit card-sized calculator courtesy of United Airlines - after a few drinks this becomes a blessing

easier in Japan as one never tips for anything except at a high-end ryokan, here is somewhere in-between the two

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Post by aargon » Sat, 10 Oct 2009 6:38 am

EADG wrote: easier in Japan as one never tips for anything except at a high-end ryokan, here is somewhere in-between the two
Yes, that is so true. There is zero tipping in Japan and the service (even at mcdonalds!) is exceptional.

In Singapore, is it normal to tip - I mean, people like taxi drivers, are they expecting a tip at the end of the trip? and how much would you tip the taxi driver for a trip from the airport to orchard road?

Thanks

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Post by jpatokal » Mon, 12 Oct 2009 11:32 am

aargon wrote:In Singapore, is it normal to tip - I mean, people like taxi drivers, are they expecting a tip at the end of the trip? and how much would you tip the taxi driver for a trip from the airport to orchard road?
Rule of thumb is, no tipping is necessary in Singapore, except maybe hotel bellhops. Cabbies do not expect tips and virtually all restaurants with table service already add on service charge (10%).
Vaguely heretical thoughts on travel technology at Gyrovague

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Post by TommyD » Mon, 12 Oct 2009 11:55 am

i refuse to tip any establishment that charges a 10% service charge. i find it rude, they should just increase the price of the food by 10% rather than trying to sting you with an extra 10% at the end.

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Post by Nath21 » Mon, 12 Oct 2009 12:23 pm

Whats the restuarant's motive with showing the 10% service charge? It looks rude as everyone else recognises why dont they just add 10% onto the food price or are they trying to prove something? Very weird is that singaporean thinking? I would like someone to explain it to me if it is. I went to a restuarant the other day on the top of mt Sophia and it had all prices inclusive. Refreshing idea and it was reasonably priced and I found out later run by an aussie, which gets me back to why I would really like to know the thought process behind showing the 10% service charge. Is it law or just a way to piss people off, or is there a competition between retausarants to show food prices as low and to justify the service component. Smells very american business orientated to me. ie. the customer must pay for the service not the business.

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Post by ScoobyDoes » Mon, 12 Oct 2009 2:54 pm

Generally i don't tip.... 1) if there is a Service Charge already built in 2) if its a place we hardly go and we know the next time we do/might go the staff would either have changed or forgotten us.

If service is excellent then yes, possible.

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Post by Girl_Next_Door » Mon, 19 Oct 2009 8:10 am

Was just reading this, and wondering, are Singaporean service industry really paid a lot better (even compared to the minimum wage in US)?

I was told once that MacDonalds pays SGD$3 to the students who works there and about $7 to adults, etc (I am not sure if this is 100% accurate since I don't work there personally). Waitresses in a restaurants get paid about $50/night and if there is no tips included, the salary isn't really what I would consider a lot better?

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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 19 Oct 2009 8:46 am

No, service personnel do not get paid well. About the norm is $7/hour and if they manage to collect a cash tip directly, well, there that much ahead but if they get caught pocketing a tip (even though it was given to them) they could lose their job. Additionally, the restaurant owner usually keeps the tips or if they do give out a portion of them they split it among 'everybody' who is working including the kitchen help, bus boys, everybody. Therefore it doesn't pay to go out of their way to provide good service as they won't make any more if they do. The whole service industry needs a good revamp but until you can convince the Chinese that the service industry is NOT a belittling occupation then it's never gonna change. Being in "servitude" is "low class" therefore they shun those kinds of positions and because so many of those businesses are owned by them, they feel the staffs are the dregs so therefore don't deserve to be paid any more than they can get away with. It's a sad, sorry state of affairs that has be going on longer than I can remember, and will probably continue to do so (Unless the IR's can change the perception! :wink: )
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

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Post by Girl_Next_Door » Mon, 19 Oct 2009 9:52 am

SMS, just out of curiosity, do you know if the service personnel in the better restaurants are also paid crappy salaries? I would assume (which is obviously a terrible assumption) that pricer restaurants (e.g. 1 Rochester) will provide quality services, but I am quite disappointed by their level of service inspite the high price I paid for the food!

Its seems like everywhere you go, you can't get good service.

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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 19 Oct 2009 10:42 am

Poor service is not directly related to the price of your food. That is more a function of location, decor, catchy name, decent food and what the market will bear. Service standards are generally similar across the board. Few exceptions of course, but the majority fit the bill. Occasionally there is the "professional" but is only a professional until someone offers them a decent salary or they have finished night school, etc., etc.
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

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Post by BooneC » Mon, 19 Oct 2009 12:53 pm

Way in back in history, tipping was reasonably common, esp in more "westernised" establishments.

The 10% service charge was introduced to replace tipping when tipping was very strongly discouraged. I believe the 10% is required by law to be distributed amongst the staff, though that could well included indirects.

Based on old memories so not 100% sure.

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