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Favourite Book

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fishtank
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Favourite Book

Postby fishtank » Fri, 24 Mar 2006 12:04 am

I've just finished reading Jodi Picoult's My Sister's Keeper. I enjoyed reading it immensely, found it really provoking. It's like the words just simply leapt out of the book and really punched me in the gut. It is one of those books that make you richer after reading it. Hope I make sense.. haha

I'm looking for another good book to read. Clearing my annual leave but not heading anywhere. Could anyone recommend any of your fave books? :)

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Bubbles
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Postby Bubbles » Fri, 24 Mar 2006 1:20 am

Perfume by Patrick Suskind

I Dreamed of Africa by Kuki Galman

We've been here before, I think? Anyway, always good to hear others' choices.
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Dylan Thomas.

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Bubbles
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Postby Bubbles » Fri, 24 Mar 2006 1:46 am

You know, no one ever comes up with

The Bible

The Koran

The Talmud

The Vedas

Etc....


when quoting their favourite books.


Why not? Have they gone out of fashion?
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.



Dylan Thomas.

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tiki
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Postby tiki » Fri, 24 Mar 2006 2:01 am

The Pearl
'If you feel alive
in a darkened room
Do you know the name
of your solitude..'

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Quasimodo
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Postby Quasimodo » Fri, 24 Mar 2006 9:08 am

Bubbles wrote:You know, no one ever comes up with

The Bible

The Koran

The Talmud

The Vedas

Etc....


when quoting their favourite books.


Why not? Have they gone out of fashion?


They were in fashion?
One in the hand is worth two of something

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Baron Greenback
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Postby Baron Greenback » Fri, 24 Mar 2006 12:25 pm

In the UK hotels put a bible in each room, the St James version I believe. I have never thought of it as odd before now as they were just always there.

But now living in Singapore the hotels I stay in can be in countries where other religions are more prevalent. Why then have I not found a copy of the Koran next to the mini bar? :)

Do you get bibles in US hotels? I have been in hotel rooms where there is an arrow pointing East, I suppose that is the nearest comparison I can come up with.
"An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his fools."
Hemingway

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tiki
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Postby tiki » Fri, 24 Mar 2006 2:23 pm

You are required to perform an abolution before handling the Al-Quran, if I am not mistaken. I am not sure if it is a MUST or a RECOMMENDED as Islam has laws guarding the MUST, RECOMMENDED and the FORBIDDEN ( basically Halal,Haram and Makruh ).

That could be the reason why you don't find the AL-Quran in hotel rooms.
'If you feel alive

in a darkened room

Do you know the name

of your solitude..'

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sundaymorningstaple
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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Fri, 24 Mar 2006 3:09 pm

Baron Greenback wrote:In the UK hotels put a bible in each room, the St James version I believe. I have never thought of it as odd before now as they were just always there.

But now living in Singapore the hotels I stay in can be in countries where other religions are more prevalent. Why then have I not found a copy of the Koran next to the mini bar? :)

Do you get bibles in US hotels? I have been in hotel rooms where there is an arrow pointing East, I suppose that is the nearest comparison I can come up with.


Don't know if they still do, but when I lived in the US they did. Usually put there by the Gideons, I believe it's the "King" James Version not "Saint". But as a practicing agnostic I may well be wrong.

This is what I found (guess we're both right):

JAMES WHO?

Even though good modern translations of the bible are available today, many fundamentalists refuse to read any translation but the Authorized Version, otherwise known to many of them as the Saint James Bible.

The James to whom they refer is King James VI of Scotland, who became King James I of England when Queen Elizabeth I died in 1603. He did not like the Geneva Bible because it was too Protestant, so he had a panel of scholars make a new traslation suitable for the church of England.

The King James, or Authorized Version was completed in 1611. It sounded old-fashiooned even in its own day, but it is one of the great works of the English language. Even though it is not based on accurate texts, many poeple think it is infallible.

Although King James was head of bothe the Church of England and the Church of Scotland, he was not personally religious. But neither did he permit freedom of religion. If you lived in Scotland, you had to be a Presbyterian; if you lived in England, you had to be an Anglican.

King James loved to hunt, and enjoyed tramping in the warm blood and guts of animals he had killed. And, although he was gather of several children, he preferred to go to bed with young men. Today, almost four hundred years later, King James has become Saint James, the patron saint of fundamentalists.

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Postby Cheekybeek » Sat, 25 Mar 2006 4:16 pm

Fishtank- I've read that book and also liked it alot. I've just gotten The Summer Garden by Paullina Simons- delivered to me from Australia can't wait to read.

I was just in Malaysia and I checked whether they had the Bible or Koran in motel but only found the yellow pages.

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Postby Global Citizen » Sat, 25 Mar 2006 6:32 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:
Don't know if they still do, but when I lived in the US they did. Usually put there by the Gideons, I believe it's the "King" James Version not "Saint". But as a practicing agnostic I may well be wrong.

This is what I found (guess we're both right):

JAMES WHO?

Even though good modern translations of the bible are available today, many fundamentalists refuse to read any translation but the Authorized Version, otherwise known to many of them as the Saint James Bible.

The James to whom they refer is King James VI of Scotland, who became King James I of England when Queen Elizabeth I died in 1603. He did not like the Geneva Bible because it was too Protestant, so he had a panel of scholars make a new traslation suitable for the church of England.

The King James, or Authorized Version was completed in 1611. It sounded old-fashiooned even in its own day, but it is one of the great works of the English language. Even though it is not based on accurate texts, many poeple think it is infallible.

Although King James was head of bothe the Church of England and the Church of Scotland, he was not personally religious. But neither did he permit freedom of religion. If you lived in Scotland, you had to be a Presbyterian; if you lived in England, you had to be an Anglican.

King James loved to hunt, and enjoyed tramping in the warm blood and guts of animals he had killed. And, although he was gather of several children, he preferred to go to bed with young men. Today, almost four hundred years later, King James has become Saint James, the patron saint of fundamentalists.


Isn't homosexuality a sin according to the Bible?
And who can forget King Henry VIII and his many wives dilemma and so the Church of England was created!

Apparently royalty didn't have to adhere to the same conventional religious doctrine the rest of the populace did.

More than enough to turn me off religious bigots and hypocrisy.
One man's meat is another's poison.

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sundaymorningstaple
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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Sat, 25 Mar 2006 6:43 pm

Global Citizen wrote:Apparently royalty didn't have to adhere to the same conventional religious doctrine the rest of the populace did.

More than enough to turn me off religious bigots and hypocrisy.


If that didn't then this will:

The Papal History


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