Japanese Restaurants In Singapore

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Wham
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Post by Wham » Sat, 22 Apr 2006 8:38 pm

I don't like to share my favorites as it can lead to overcrowding - but EN on Mohammed Sultan is my favorite - Okinawan japanese - VERY nice.
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Post by ZZOOzzoo » Sun, 23 Apr 2006 1:16 am

I think most sushi bars are generally decent, but I have yet to find somewhere spectacular. One place I advice you to avoid is the soba restaurant(forgot the exact name, but it's right next to "My Mum's Cuisine") in the basement of Paragon. It claims to be "authentic" and "expert" and blah blah but the thing is that they have the worst soba ever. The noodle was unpleasantly thick and, erm, tofu-ish, while the soup tasted like pure soysauce. Ugh..
Baron Greenback wrote:I had a really good meal at a place in Chimes. It was more like Korean BBQ meets Japanese food. They do a special type of beef there as well - which was divine. It is in the corner of Chines near the front entrance near the car park.

I'd give it 4 stars :D
I'm glad you found it similar to Korean BBQ, because it IS Korean BBQ. -_- Japanese have history of "borrowing" cuisines from other countries such as China, India, Korea, or even French and claim it their own with a little tweak. Unfortunately, since Japan has the biggest influence to Western world among Asian countries, many foreigners just believe it all originated from Japan. :roll:

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Post by Dianthus » Sun, 23 Apr 2006 1:49 pm

Think ZZOOzzoo is refering to a soba restaurant, Shinbashi. Too bad you didn't enjoy it. But I reckon their soba is the most authentic one found in Singapore. Soba can be cut in fine or thick. It can be much thicker than what Shinbashi offers (called Inaka Soba). Its real texture is chewy, not like those instant soba which is really soft w/o any texture. When you dip your soba, you don't dip all the soba into your cup n mix with the sauce. Instead, you only dip half of the soba. That's why the sauce is thick. Give it another try. It might taste better. Don't forget to ask for Sobayu to finish up the dish! Enjoy :)

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Post by ZZOOzzoo » Mon, 24 Apr 2006 1:38 am

Dianthus wrote:Think ZZOOzzoo is refering to a soba restaurant, Shinbashi. Too bad you didn't enjoy it. But I reckon their soba is the most authentic one found in Singapore. Soba can be cut in fine or thick. It can be much thicker than what Shinbashi offers (called Inaka Soba). Its real texture is chewy, not like those instant soba which is really soft w/o any texture. When you dip your soba, you don't dip all the soba into your cup n mix with the sauce. Instead, you only dip half of the soba. That's why the sauce is thick. Give it another try. It might taste better. Don't forget to ask for Sobayu to finish up the dish! Enjoy :)
I'm completely aware of what you said. Soba has been one of my favorite foods of all time, but I simply dislike the one at Paragon. :s As I said, it was very tofu-ish and not chewy at all. Maybe I just chose a wrong date at a wrong time? :?

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Post by Dianthus » Mon, 24 Apr 2006 11:29 pm

Hum ... maybe. But that isn't a good sign .. :?
Wish it was chewier actually .. don't you think?

Do you know any better place for soba? Or are we asking too much? Haha.

Do you know udon place called Sanuki (I think) at some food courts i.e. Scotts Picnic? Their udon used not to be over-cooked, really chewey n nice. But after a while it got over-cooked soft noodle, just like some local noodles. Perhaps they got complains that udon was too tough from those who don't know what sanuki udon is really like .. localisation may play a great part to sell the product but for Japanese that was a real shame. :(

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Post by jpatokal » Tue, 25 Apr 2006 7:47 pm

Wham wrote:I don't like to share my favorites as it can lead to overcrowding - but EN on Mohammed Sultan is my favorite - Okinawan japanese - VERY nice.
I'd tip Nirai-Kanai (in Tanglin SC) over En. Pricing is more reasonable and the food is more authentic -- the staff are all Okinawan! Soki soba (Okinawan-style ramen) is the top pick for most visitors.
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Post by EADG » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 1:00 am

ZZOOzzoo wrote:I'm glad you found it similar to Korean BBQ, because it IS Korean BBQ. -_- Japanese have history of "borrowing" cuisines from other countries ...
it's not borrowed, GyuKaku is a Japanese-owned chain of Korean food, not unlike Outback is an Aussie-themed American chain

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Post by EADG » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 1:10 am

jpatokal wrote:
Wham wrote:I don't like to share my favorites as it can lead to overcrowding - but EN on Mohammed Sultan is my favorite - Okinawan japanese - VERY nice.
I'd tip Nirai-Kanai (in Tanglin SC) over En. Pricing is more reasonable and the food is more authentic -- the staff are all Okinawan! Soki soba (Okinawan-style ramen) is the top pick for most visitors.
not all, there's some local Chinese folks working there (try speaking Japanese)......hmm...I prefer the variety of En, but must be loyal to my dragonboat team's home base....

but, jp (what does your handle mean anyway?), as you and Dianthus seem well-versed in washouku, where would you recommend for the beer-and-yakitori conviviality of izakayas? Brooklyn has always been too crowded to get in, I wonder if there are other similar places (in Singapore, I don't get to Jakarta often)? I heard that the "best yakitoriyasan in Singapore" is gone.

I wonder how badly the decreasing Japanese population in Singapore has affected the choices.
Last edited by EADG on Wed, 26 Apr 2006 1:17 am, edited 3 times in total.

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Post by EADG » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 1:13 am

Dianthus wrote:Hey EADG, how about Izakaya Nijuumaru at Cappage Plaza?

I havn't been there but heard from a Japanese guy that it's one of ok places. :)
let's check it out sometime - jp?
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Post by jpatokal » Wed, 26 Apr 2006 8:33 pm

EADG wrote:but, jp (what does your handle mean anyway?)
You'll have to ask my evil twin Al J. Patok for that. :P
as you and Dianthus seem well-versed in washouku, where would you recommend for the beer-and-yakitori conviviality of izakayas? Brooklyn has always been too crowded to get in, I wonder if there are other similar places (in Singapore, I don't get to Jakarta often)? I heard that the "best yakitoriyasan in Singapore" is gone.
As said earlier, I haven't found any truly good izakaya in Singapore yet, but if there is one somewhere it's probably in Cuppage... and I just might sign up for that Nijuumaru excursion 8-)
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Post by earthfriendly » Fri, 28 Apr 2006 3:20 am

ZZOOzzoo wrote: I'm glad you found it similar to Korean BBQ, because it IS Korean BBQ. -_- Japanese have history of "borrowing" cuisines from other countries such as China, India, Korea, or even French and claim it their own with a little tweak. Unfortunately, since Japan has the biggest influence to Western world among Asian countries, many foreigners just believe it all originated from Japan. :roll:
The major influence on Japanese cuisine is Chinese. You find a lot of similar ingredients between the two :sesame seed oil, soya sauce, rice wine, pickled ginger, tofu and soy bean by-products. However, a large part of Japanese cuisine is quite distinctive like miso paste and nigiri sushi. Chinese also eat raw fish (yusheng) but unlike the nigiri way. Rather we eat slices of raw fish and seafood.

And I love the presantation of Japanese food. It is so esthetically pleasing :wink: .

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Post by SINILA » Mon, 01 May 2006 4:45 pm

Many of my freinds go to these 2 restaurants:

Shima at Goodwood Park is good.
So is Inagi-Ku at Raffles City.

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Post by serendipity » Mon, 01 May 2006 9:37 pm

jpatokal wrote:
EADG wrote:but, jp (what does your handle mean anyway?)
You'll have to ask my evil twin Al J. Patok for that. :P
[/quote]

Blimey! And I always thought it's jp as Japan ato=after that kal=(maybe) California as you somehow strike me to have an American influence when you write... if not an American perhaps? Might be wrong...
Cause in some certain language that you seem to know as well, it's written Kalifornia instead ;)

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Post by tuesdayisbest » Wed, 03 May 2006 4:19 am

Hanabi Japanese Restaurant
559 Bukit Timah Rd,King's Arcade

Hanabi Restaurant and Sake Bar
331 North Bridge Road,Odeon Towers

* All-you-can-eat-ala-carte style.About $30-ish.About 100 selections. *

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Post by jpatokal » Sat, 06 May 2006 6:28 pm

serendipity wrote:
jpatokal wrote:
EADG wrote:but, jp (what does your handle mean anyway?)
You'll have to ask my evil twin Al J. Patok for that. :P
Blimey! And I always thought it's jp as Japan ato=after that kal=(maybe) California as you somehow strike me to have an American influence when you write... if not an American perhaps? Might be wrong...
I'm afraid I'm pulling your leg again, m'dear... it's really short for Pat J. O'Kalley. Or maybe not. :cool:

But I did live in New York for a couple of years, and I can still recite the Brooklyn alphabet when I encounter a proper source of inspiration.
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