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Bremen
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Postby Bremen » Fri, 03 Mar 2006 10:52 am

Vaucluse wrote:Corruption - absolutely, but is Arroyo involved in it or is she stepping on toes trying to clean it up?


If she's involved, then it's to a very small, well-managed degree. Nothing as blatantly obvious as Estrada. She's been stepping on quite a few toes, and a lot of the people who are trying to get her out and accusing her of corruption are the people who's toes she's stepped on. ;)

She's been reducing corruption a heck of a lot more than contributing to it.
"Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life."
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coarls
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Postby coarls » Thu, 09 Mar 2006 6:15 pm

Bremen wrote:
Vaucluse wrote:Corruption - absolutely, but is Arroyo involved in it or is she stepping on toes trying to clean it up?


If she's involved, then it's to a very small, well-managed degree. Nothing as blatantly obvious as Estrada. She's been stepping on quite a few toes, and a lot of the people who are trying to get her out and accusing her of corruption are the people who's toes she's stepped on. ;)

She's been reducing corruption a heck of a lot more than contributing to it.


But she definitely has to resolve the problems there...this stone walling tactic is just pulling down the country's economy deeper...but another question arises if ever she does step down..who is going to replace her??? :???: :???: :???:
Ad astra per aspera...

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GordonGekko
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Postby GordonGekko » Thu, 09 Mar 2006 6:33 pm

Hey Coarls,

You rise valid points. Firstly, during Arroyo's reign the economy has been on steady, backward slope. Secondly, it is imperative not to leave a political vacuum behind if a president is to be ousted.
Sadly, the lack of replacement underlines the problem that has been haunting the Philippines for decades: that the ten richest families own 90% of the country's assets. :cry: The status quo shows an unwillingness of managing this situation. It's not a secret that even the richest families would be better off, if the wealth would be distributed more evenly.
You do what you are.

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Bremen
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Postby Bremen » Fri, 10 Mar 2006 10:58 am

GordonGekko wrote:Hey Coarls,

You rise valid points. Firstly, during Arroyo's reign the economy has been on steady, backward slope.


Say what? The economy nosedived under Estrada, and it's picked up tremendously under Arroyo.

However, every time the economy picks up, the leftists and Estrada cronies stir up trouble, this then brings the economy down, and then they blame it on Arroyo. They obviously don't want the poorer filipinos to start feeling the beneficial effects of a good economy, lest they start thinking good things of Arroyo.
"Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life."

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Postby coarls » Fri, 10 Mar 2006 6:37 pm

Bremen wrote:
GordonGekko wrote:Hey Coarls,

You rise valid points. Firstly, during Arroyo's reign the economy has been on steady, backward slope.


Say what? The economy nosedived under Estrada, and it's picked up tremendously under Arroyo.

However, every time the economy picks up, the leftists and Estrada cronies stir up trouble, this then brings the economy down, and then they blame it on Arroyo. They obviously don't want the poorer filipinos to start feeling the beneficial effects of a good economy, lest they start thinking good things of Arroyo.


C'mon man...the country has been up's and more down's ever since...the static saw tooth graph has never been the same...data says that it's reviving from the Peso slump because it's hitting what...P54 or P53 against the almight $1.00?? Talk about the EVAT or the GVAT or the HVAT or all those VAT they have imposed to make the "economy" cosmetically good...

It's not that we are blaming old goody two shoe Arroyo for everything...it has always been like that the culture itself that has been bestowed on the dear old country has taken it's toll...we just didn't see it before (or we weren't born yet then... :wink: ) but the impact of everything thanks to good old Marcos era is not prevalent on what is happening...

have you read this column...

__________________

There's The Rub : Revenge of the ‘trapos’

First posted 00:52am (Mla time) Mar 07, 2006
By Conrado de Quiros
Inquirer
Editor's Note: Published on page A10 of the March 7, 2006 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer

A COUPLE of foreign journalists asked me again recently how Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo has managed to cling to power despite the surveys that say most of her countrymen do not like her and want her out of power.

Well, the easiest explanation for it, one that’s been on many people’s lips for some time now, is that she has a fantastic talent for bringing out the worst in people. She has a gift for corrupting people.

There is no institution in this society that has not been touched by the hand of greed. The civil service has been corrupted, or corrupted some more since it was already corrupt from the start. The bishops have been corrupted, if indeed they too had not already been so over the years, becoming direct beneficiaries of the government gaming firm Pagcor, and therefore indirectly of gambling money. Civil society has been corrupted, the pillars of the movement becoming Arroyo’s rah-rah boys and girls. Some of them have left Arroyo, many remain with her, though the ones



















who have recovered their senses are the more important NGO figures. The media have been corrupted, until recently the country’s two biggest networks being united in singing Arroyo’s praises.

Above all the military has been corrupted, with the top positions in the chain of command being awarded to those who helped steal the votes wholesale in parts of Mindanao. Even the Left has been corrupted, with some of those who once ferociously fought Marcos for imposing a dictatorship now ferociously helping Arroyo mount one.

All this, of course, must also say something about the corruptibility of the Filipino. To corrupt, you need a corruptor and a corruptee. The stronger the corruptor or the weaker the corruptee, the more intense the corruption. What’s happened over the last few years seems a case of both: There is no stronger corruptor and there is no weaker corruptee. Congress, in particular, no longer bothers to hide its perfidies. You have to wonder about our capacity to resist worldly temptation compared to other peoples of this earth.

But I’ve yet one more theory that better explains how Arroyo has gained power and kept it. It’s something that was suggested to me by the analyses-or what passes for them in these parts-that appeared in several newspapers after the 2004 elections. Those analyses said that Arroyo’s victory at the polls showed that the reign of the entertainers over politics was over. Arroyo had shown that the most popular actor in this country could be beaten.

At the time those analyses appeared, which was long before the "Garci tape" surfaced, I was prepared to believe that Arroyo might have won the elections by a variety of cheating but not by the outright manufacturing of ballots. The cheating, I thought, consisted of the massive pillage of the treasury (Pagcor and the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office, in particular) and use of government offices to campaign, dirty tricks like the tearing down of posters of rival camps, and old-fashioned wholesale vote-buying. As it turned out, it wasn’t just that. Even with that kind of cheating and with the opposition’s propensity to self-destruct, Poe was still popular enough to win the elections. That was what compelled Arroyo to call up then-election commissioner Virgilio Garcillano.

But let us leave Garci for the nonce. Arroyo might not have won the elections but she won the crown anyway. She might not have won by farce but she won by force. Now the question is: How did she get the country to accept that?

She did so by harping on a fear that had been building up in the country since the 1990s, the fear of the entertainers overrunning politics. That fear gripped two groups of people who profoundly abhorred the thought.

The first was the middle class. That was the bulwark of Edsa People Power I and II, which felt that it subverted everything Edsa People Power stood for. Edsa People Power stood for a politics of substance, the entertainers stood for a politics of silliness. That was the equation. I maintain that Edsa People Power II was a legitimate exercise of People Power, but I would not also put it past many of those who mounted it to have been motivated by a desire to get back at the one person who symbolized the reign of the entertainers, Joseph Estrada. Edsa People Power achieved many things, but it also opened the floodgates to the possibility of stopping the entertainers not by hook but by crook, not by vote but by violence.

More than the middle class, the second group saw the entertainers as Satan’s spawn. That was the traditional politicians, the "trapos," whose star (pardon the irony) particularly in national elections had dimmed dramatically and stood to be snuffed out completely unless something drastic was done. They were being battered right and left by the actors, singers and basketball players notwithstanding the organization, personnel and money at their command. They were determined to do something about that misfortune, and found the perfect opportunity for it in the 2004 elections. Arroyo stole the elections, but they not only went along with it, they made sure it would stick. Never more would an entertainer seize Malacañang, even if it killed them -- or better still killed the entertainers -- to do it.

The analysis that the 2004 election marked the end of the reign of the entertainers is true in part. It did, not because Arroyo won the vote against a popular actor, but simply because she and the trapos mugged the electorate with the tacit consent of the middle class. The analysis in fact merely raises a more important question, which is: If the 2004 elections ended the reign of the entertainers, then who came to replace them?

In fact, what happened was not a step forward, it was a step backward. It was not progress, it was retrogression. It merely brought back what had been there before the entertainers stopped being entertaining by going into politics: The rule of the trapos.

May 2004 was the revenge of the trapos.
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