Singapore Expats Forum

Is it Swinging in Singapore time again?

Discuss about the latest news & interesting topics, real life experience or other out of topic discussions with locals & expatriates in Singapore.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34785
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Is it Swinging in Singapore time again?

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Thu, 08 Dec 2005 3:26 pm

CUBBY LEONG
cubby@newstoday.com.sg

ONE by one, they made their way to the home of the woman who headed the drug syndicate. And, one after another, the waiting Central Narcotics Bureau (CNB) officers nabbed them.

A British management consultant, a construction supervisor also from Britain, a young Malaysian woman who works as a sports coach, a Japanese director, Thai prostitutes ... all of them were arrested. Some were carrying drugs, some had imbibed them. When it was all over, the officers had rounded up the 31-year-old Thai woman who heads the drugs syndicate, her American boyfriend, as well as 12 others who came to buy cocaine, Ice, cannabis or Ecstasy from her home.

The profile of these
buyers showed the syndicate was catering to well-heeled expatriates.
According to the CNB, the operation kicked off just after 3pm on Monday, when the officers — who had received some information about the syndicate — spotted a 45-year-old British management consultant making his way to the Thai woman’s Oxley Garden home.

The van carrying the Briton was
stopped and cocaine and ketamine were found on board.

A procession began. A 30-year-old British director was next to arrive and when he left 20 minutes later, his vehicle, too, was stopped. A cocaine-stained packet was seized.

Another British man, together with a female Malaysian sports coach were the next to drop by. Her urine tested positive for cannabis. Around 7.50pm, the operation
took another twist. A 24-year-old Thai woman spotted leaving the syndicate chief’s home was found to have packets of the stimulant Ice hidden in her underwear. She
turned out to be a runner for another drug trafficker — a 37-yearold Thai prostitute.

The raids now moved to Balestier Road — where a further two male Thai prostitutes were caught for substance abuse and Telok Blangah Rise, where the 37-year-old trafficker and some clients were caught. All this while, the woman at the heart of the Oxley Garden syndicate remained unaware that her clients were being picked up as they left her home. Finally, around 8.20pm, she and her boyfriend, an American who works as a senior operations manager, left their Oxley Garden home. They were nabbed and both tested positive or drugs. Only the mopping-up remained and it was in the course of this that two other client a Japanese director and a Singaporean contractor were nabbed.

While some of the clients have been let off on bail, the syndicate leader and the drug trafficker are likely to be charged today.


I really can't believe it. But, as I pointed out earlier, the local drug enforcement officers are connected a whole lot better than most think. Learn the hard way and swing or cold storage for a long time.

User avatar
Global Citizen
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 675
Joined: Mon, 07 Mar 2005
Location: Still looking for Paradise

Postby Global Citizen » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 8:39 am

Wow its deja vu. When will some learn?
One man's meat is another's poison.

User avatar
Mary Hatch Bailey
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1579
Joined: Thu, 06 Oct 2005
Location: Bedford Falls

Postby Mary Hatch Bailey » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 8:40 am

Global Citizen wrote:Wow its deja vu. When will some learn?


Oh, didn't you know? The death penalty is a powerful deterrent...

Ya right.

User avatar
Global Citizen
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 675
Joined: Mon, 07 Mar 2005
Location: Still looking for Paradise

Postby Global Citizen » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 8:57 am

Mary Hatch Bailey wrote:
Global Citizen wrote:Wow its deja vu. When will some learn?


Oh, didn't you know? The death penalty is a powerful deterrent...

Ya right.



Not sure to whom you're aiming this at but since you've quoted me I feel compelled to respond. I don' t make the laws; I can only respect and obey them as it stands. In case you missed it, I was one of those who was sitting on the fence in Van's case because I felt compassion and as a mother and parent to a son, I can well sympathise with what Van's mother must have been and still is going through. Yes I even felt for Van because of his youth and asked myself, God forbid what if I were in his mother's shoes.

Having said that, that's the law and how much of a deterrent it is or isn't, you and I are in no position to say unless its proven otherwise by actual stats when and if the death penalty is ever abolished.
Last edited by Global Citizen on Sat, 10 Dec 2005 8:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
One man's meat is another's poison.

User avatar
Mary Hatch Bailey
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1579
Joined: Thu, 06 Oct 2005
Location: Bedford Falls

Postby Mary Hatch Bailey » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 9:06 am

Woah, woah, woah! GC you're giving a $50 response to a $.20 comment.

I wasn't in anyway referring to your personal stance at all -- to tell you the truth I lost track a long time ago: who stood where on this issue.

It was just a general statement on how the deterrent argument, in my opinion, falls apart in cases like this.

So of course it is deja vu allover again, people will contnue to take and therefore deal drugs, death penalty or no death penalty.

User avatar
samantha
Chatter
Chatter
Posts: 226
Joined: Sat, 23 Jul 2005
Location: Singapore

Postby samantha » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 9:09 am

So of course it is deja vu allover again, people will contnue to take and therefore deal drugs, death penalty or no death penalty.


Sooooo... any suggestions for a better deterent? :wink:
I'm so stupid that I surprise myself sometimes...

User avatar
Mary Hatch Bailey
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1579
Joined: Thu, 06 Oct 2005
Location: Bedford Falls

Postby Mary Hatch Bailey » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 9:26 am

Yes of course!

Better schools
Better parenting
Not allowing maids to raise children
Mandatory community service in prisons
Mandatory community service in rehab centers
More funding for rehabilitation
Re-classification of types of drugs
No mandatory minimum sentences

I could go and on. Samantha, I'm no drug czar but I think its obvious the plan in place is not working.

User avatar
CardZeus
Chatter
Chatter
Posts: 340
Joined: Fri, 07 Oct 2005
Location: Singapore
Contact:

Postby CardZeus » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 9:28 am

Legalise it :cool:
The most incomprehensible thing about the world is that it is at all comprehensible.

User avatar
k1w1
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 680
Joined: Mon, 30 May 2005

Postby k1w1 » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 9:37 am

Agree with your list, Mary. I would also add:

* Tougher sentencing (although not here - don't think it gets much tougher)
* Acknowledgement of the problem (by the govt) and the extent of such
* Longer rehabilitation periods, including counselling sessions with ex-addicts or families of drug addicts (studies in New Zealand have shown this to be extremely effective in rehabilitation of sex offenders who are then forced to see how much these actions have affected another person/group of people :cry: )

Actually, yeah I could go on and on too.

User avatar
Global Citizen
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 675
Joined: Mon, 07 Mar 2005
Location: Still looking for Paradise

Postby Global Citizen » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 9:41 am

CardZeus wrote:Legalise it :cool:


Yeah CZ, I've heard this but my question is, how has this lessened the problem of smuggling in the Netherlands? I know marijuana, hash is legalised but not the harder drugs? (I'm asking)

My understanding of the issue is not in depth but I believe that because of the loopholes in Dutch law for this provision, smugglers from overseas are bringing in harder drugs. Eric should be able to confirm this first hand.

Do you really believe that legalising all drugs will minimise the problem or just eliminate the criminal element of it? Alcohol is legal and drinking and age limits set in place for drivers yet we still have drunk drivers who kill others. Would be interested to how you think this would work given Singapore's geograhical postion within the Golden Triangle.
One man's meat is another's poison.

User avatar
samantha
Chatter
Chatter
Posts: 226
Joined: Sat, 23 Jul 2005
Location: Singapore

Postby samantha » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 9:47 am

Do you really believe that legalising all drugs will minimise the problem or just eliminate the criminal element of it?


I think it 'll just eliminate the criminal element of it...

Not allowing maids to raise children


Are you saying that the maids play a big part in influencing children to take drugs? :shock: :shock:
I'm so stupid that I surprise myself sometimes...

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 34785
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004
Location: Still Fishing!
Contact:

Postby sundaymorningstaple » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 9:59 am

As I said on another thread recently, legalizing it will not stop the problem or even slow down the illegal trade. Once you legalize something, like alcohol, tobacco, or drugs it then is subject to taxes of one sort or another as a form of control by the imposing government.

Once it is taxed then the bootleg trafficking starts all over again trying to avoid the taxes. Witness the amount of ciggies confiscated coming across the causeway buried in Pork or Vegetables. Witness the amounts of cheap brandy poured into old Hennessy, Otard bottles and resealed and sold to unsuspecting fools at a so-called discount.

The legalization of anything won't eliminate the problem that's why the ATF squads are so busy in the US even today. People are still dying of Alcohol poisioning from bad moonshine liquour.

User avatar
Mary Hatch Bailey
Manager
Manager
Posts: 1579
Joined: Thu, 06 Oct 2005
Location: Bedford Falls

Postby Mary Hatch Bailey » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 9:59 am

I'm saying it's the parents job, not a maids. A parents.

User avatar
CardZeus
Chatter
Chatter
Posts: 340
Joined: Fri, 07 Oct 2005
Location: Singapore
Contact:

Postby CardZeus » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 10:56 am

Yeah CZ, I've heard this but my question is, how has this lessened the problem of smuggling in the Netherlands? I know marijuana, hash is legalised but not the harder drugs? (I'm asking)


My post was somewhat tongue in cheek, however there are double standards here. Tobacco and alcohol have a huge detrimental effect, yet they are legal. I believe education is the way forward. Softer drugs like cannabis should be decriminalised (which I believe is the case in Holland - it is not 'legal'). People know the dangers of tobacco and alcohol and still choose to use them. I also believe in freedom of choice - but it should be an educated choice. It's obvious that criminalisation is not working; would the situation be better if certain drugs were decriminalised? I'm not sure. However I think I'd rather have a situation where if a heroin addict, for example, needs a fix then he can legally obtain one from a registered clinic, and not feel the need to commit another crime to obtain the money required.
The most incomprehensible thing about the world is that it is at all comprehensible.

User avatar
Global Citizen
Reporter
Reporter
Posts: 675
Joined: Mon, 07 Mar 2005
Location: Still looking for Paradise

Postby Global Citizen » Fri, 09 Dec 2005 11:16 am

CardZeus wrote: However I think I'd rather have a situation where if a heroin addict, for example, needs a fix then he can legally obtain one from a registered clinic, and not feel the need to commit another crime to obtain the money required.


If I'm to understand what you're saying correctly here, is that the heroin addict should be able to obtain his fix, that is feed his addiction free or rather at taxpayeers expense. I don't think that's gonna fly; (excuse the pun) nope not by a long shot.
One man's meat is another's poison.


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “General Discussions”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests