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sapphire
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Postby sapphire » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 3:13 pm

Vaucluse wrote:
Carpe Diem wrote:So do I...
French and American agreeing... now that is strange!



And to top it all of you two should give one another a Gallic embrace and do some kissy-kissies (three times each cheek!)

Can I take pics when you two give kissies to each other? :twisted:

Wham, you still calling them freedom fries or waiting for kisses from CD to say french fries again? :P
It's not getting any smarter out there. You have to come to terms with stupidity, and make it work for you.

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Postby Wham » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 3:16 pm

well... to tell you the truth... i never really could get into the whole FREEDOM FRIES thing - a bit too Ronny Raygun for my ears...
"He who makes a beast of himself gets rid of the pain of being a man." Samuel Johnson

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Postby Vaucluse » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 3:17 pm

...how do we get off topic so easily???



This isa question you pose only now? :lol:
......................................................

'nuff said Image

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Postby sapphire » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 3:19 pm

Haha, yeah a bit too late to pose that question. Ok Wham, so you never got into the whole Freedom fries thing, fine, we believe you...NOT!
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Postby Carpe Diem » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 3:23 pm

OK, time to bring the truth to all of you, bunch of ignorant people...

French fries

Potatoes that have been cut into thick to thin strips, soaked in cold water, blotted dry, then deep-fried until crisp and golden brown. They are called pommes frites in France and chips in Britain. The name does not come from the fact that their origin is French, but because the potatoes are "frenched" -- cut into lengthwise strips. Other versions of french-fried potatoes are shoestring potatoes (matchstick-wide) and steakfries (very thick strips).

How many of you did know that, honestly?
La vie est trop courte, profitons de chaque instant

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Postby sapphire » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 3:43 pm

I knew that you guys don't call them french fries, but the rest of the world does! Deal with it! :P
It's not getting any smarter out there. You have to come to terms with stupidity, and make it work for you.

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Postby Carpe Diem » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 3:46 pm

Can't you be honest, just once? :mrgreen:
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Postby sapphire » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 3:54 pm

Honesty is overrated, just as french fries are. :P
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Postby Carpe Diem » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 4:07 pm

Honestly I don't care what you think about the rating of potatoes cut into lengthwise strips.
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Postby Wind In My Hair » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 5:32 pm

Carpe Diem wrote:The name does not come from the fact that their origin is French, but because the potatoes are "frenched" -- cut into lengthwise strips.

which begs the question, why is cutting into lengthwise strips called 'frenching'? or am i the only one who doesn't know this? #-o

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Postby Carpe Diem » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 5:58 pm

Naming Things: Old Word Order

By Barbara Rosen International Herald Tribune

Friday, January 15, 1993

Ask for a Swiss steak in Zurich or a Russian salad in Moscow, and you're bound to get puzzled looks. But while they may not exist in the countries whose names they bear, there is a reason they're called what they are. A surprising number of foreign labels can be traced to explanations - some laudatory, some pejorative, some just plain wrong.

Often, said John Simpson, the co-editor of the Oxford English Dictionary, "the word for the country is just used to mean rather odd or peculiar." "French cricket," for example, applies to a form of the game that's just not the traditional one. "It's not intended as a great racial slur," Simpson said. "It's just they do things in a slightly different way than we do."

Across the Atlantic, it's typically "Chinese." " 'Chinese' is a word that's used for a lot of things that just mean foreign," said David Weeks, a senior editor at The American Heritage Dictionary. "In olden days, 'Chinese' was practically a synonym for 'funny' or 'odd.' It doesn't actually mean that the thing comes from China."

It doesn't take much for the foreign-as-different label to slip into the slur. "French letter," which appeared as an English term for condoms in the mid-19th century, was employed to describe "slightly under-the-counter sort of things," Simpson said. "At the time, they were not the sort of thing to discuss in polite company," and therefore couldn't be claimed as one's own.

"Something like 'Chinese fire drill,' that's clearly derogatory," added Reinhold Aman, editor of Maledicta ("the international journal of verbal aggression"). "But 'Chinese checkers' is not."

English anti-Dutch compounds stuck after 17th-century conflicts, said Richard Lederer, a language writer based in New Hampshire, citing "Dutch courage" (courage because of intoxicants) and "Dutch treat" (no treat at all).

Of course, foreign labels can also add cachet. The American "French dry cleaning" technique, which involved hand-dipping clothing in a solvent, did originate in France in the early 1800s, said Dawn Adams, an instructor at the International Fabricare Institute in Maryland. But because of U. S. safety regulations, "you can't do it now," she added. Cleaners who claim to are "probably doing more of a spot-cleaning thing."

Among other real origins, a 1937 article quoted in the Oxford English Dictionary describes "Russian roulette" being practiced among Russian troops in Romania. "Indian summer," says the Encyclopaedia Britannica, originated in the northeastern U. S. "and probably arose from the Indians' practice of gathering winter stores at this time." Such late warm seasons are called "All-hallown" or "old wives" summers in Europe.

"French leave," or unauthorized departure, actually dates from an 18th-century custom, popular in France, of leaving without saying good-bye to one's hostess.

THE roots of "French toast" are in the French dish pain perdu, according to The Dictionary of American Food and Drink by John F. Mariani, which also lists its names in other countries and notes that at various times in America it has been called "Spanish," "German," and "nun's" toast.

"Danish pastry," meanwhile, seems to have been a case of good marketing. According to "America's Table" by Joseph D. Vehling, the term was much in use in 1917-18 in connection with a single baker who was indeed from Copenhagen and who traveled to various American cities demonstrating his pastry-making techniques: "Nothing new or spectacular nor particularly 'Danish.' His 'Danish pastry' had been practiced for ages in Continental Europe, which he admitted."

Yet while deep-fried potatoes may be ubiquitous in France, the name "french fries" comes not from an assumption of origin but from the "frenching" method of cutting potatoes into narrow strips, according to The Dictionary of American Food and Drink.

THEN there's "in-the-style-of." A "Russian salad" of vegetables with mayonnaise originally contained beet root, which may have led to its association with things Russian, said the OED's Simpson. "Russian dressing," according to various gastronomic tomes, is an American invention, possibly so-named because it originally included caviar, or was thought to resemble Russian salad.

Lastly, there's the "was it just a slip of the tongue" category. Experts believe Great Danes came from Germany, according to "Misnomers," by Mark and Diane Kender Dittrick. And guinea pigs come from Guyana'

Foreign labeling, in all its forms, is not restricted to English. "Homard a l'américaine," or "lobster American-style," cooked in oil and tomatoes, was created in France by a French chef (though he had spent time working in America), according to the 1988 Larousse Gastronomique. Look up "French letter" in the Collins Robert English-French dictionary and you'll find "capote anglaise." Look up "French leave" and you'll find it's "à l'anglaise."

And while "unintelligible" may be "all Greek" to an English speaker, it's "Chinese" to a Greek, says Elias Petropoulos, a Greek writer who lives in Paris. He adds: "All mankind calls syphilis the 'French disease' - except the French, who say it's the 'illness of Naples.' "

Barbara Rosen is a free-lance journalist living in Paris.

Source: http://www.iht.com/bin/print_ipub.php?f ... 5/word.php
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Postby Wind In My Hair » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 6:02 pm

Carpe Diem wrote:Yet while deep-fried potatoes may be ubiquitous in France, the name "french fries" comes not from an assumption of origin but from the "frenching" method of cutting potatoes into narrow strips, according to The Dictionary of American Food and Drink.

thanks CD, interesting article. did not answer my question though. why is cutting into strips called 'frenching'?

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Postby Carpe Diem » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 6:17 pm

OK what about this:

"The consensus of opinion seems to be that Thomas Jefferson brought this method of cooking potatoes back from France in the late 1700's and he called it "the French method of frying potatoes", which was later shortened to "french fries".

Even if "french fries" came from "frenching", that word originally meant "cutting food into long strips in the method of the French," so either way it goes back to France.

We think the Thomas Jefferson story is the correct one. The French originated this method of cooking potatoes, so they were called FRENCH-FRIED POTATOES, later shortened to FRENCH FRIES.

Of course, the Belgians claim THEY invented this method of cooking potatoes before the French. However, there WAS no Belgium per se, in the late 1700's. That part of Europe was part of France back then..... "


Source: http://www.hungrybrowser.com/phaedrus/m012902.htm

This theory being written by an American, I would be careful about its validity...

And, just to avoid confusion, our cooking method is different from our kissing method! :P
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Postby micknlea » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 6:24 pm

You beat me to it Carpe...I was looking it up as I had never heard of that term, and this article says that "frenching" comes from "french fries"!

http://www.straightdope.com/mailbag/mfrenchfry.html

:D

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Postby Wham » Mon, 24 Oct 2005 9:28 pm

For the record - i like Mayonnaise on my Frites.
"He who makes a beast of himself gets rid of the pain of being a man." Samuel Johnson


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