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Bike Crashes

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Bike Crashes

Postby Strong Eagle » Sat, 17 Sep 2005 7:41 am

This is a movie of the new Goldwing's airbag deploying.

What's interesting is the impact (in a bizarre sort of way!). Too bad they had to ruin two new Goldwings.

http://www.herbhost.com/waves/goldwing bag1.mpg

PS: That bike really had to be moving to push that car around like that.

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Postby Strong Eagle » Sat, 17 Sep 2005 7:45 am

This movie demonstrates why it really is a good idea to get some training before jumping on a motorcycle.

http://www.herbhost.com/miscimg/crashzuki.mpg

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Postby Strong Eagle » Sat, 17 Sep 2005 7:52 am

And this is a reminder to never ride faster than your guardian angel can fly.

Notice that every last bike is a sport bike? I went to a motorcycle salvage yard for parts. Of the 140 motorcycles there, 111 were sport bikes.

http://www.herbhost.com/waves/crashcollage.wmv

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Postby dot dot dot » Sat, 17 Sep 2005 9:54 am

Damn SE,

I just couldn't complete that one of all the bike accidents and the unskinned riders, too much on a Saturday morning for me. Pushed away my breakfast literally, really. Need to recuperate here and now.... :(

Fully agree though.... Always found it unbelievable to see some heroes on the highways doing more than 250 km/h on a bike.

Remember once in Germany on the Autobahn, I was driving in a Porsche GT2 with a friend (he driving, me sitting on the 'passenger' seat). We were driving about 290 km/h, sweat dripping from my back and hands, then there came this guy on a Ducati, overtaking us from the right (in Germany you are supposed to overtake on the left) on the emergency lane. I will never forget the moment he overtook us, looking at us and waving his left hand at us like: 'come on guys, faster'. He was doing more than 295 km/hr.....

No way I would ever ride a bike faster than a 150 km/hr. Not me.

Eric

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Postby beenhere10years » Sun, 18 Sep 2005 7:57 am

When I was quite young, I want to say 15 or 16 or so -- I was asked by a friend of my oldest brother's to help him out with a photo shoot in New York City. Now before you imagine Victoria's Secret lingerie ads, this was for educational film strips (does anyone remember those?) depicting verbs to use in primary schools in the US.

The photographer's name was Jerry and he was about 32, very promising career -- had already accumulated quite a portfolio. He was tall and handsome a rode a big bike, don't remember the make or model. For 2 days we zipped around the 5 boroughs of New York on his motorcycle: Manhattan, Brooklyn Heights, the Bronx to take photographs of me running, jumping, hopping, etc... Quite a heady experience for a young girl from the suburbs.

I was a bit rattled riding on the back of that bike, I have to tell you. In and out of traffic, splitting lanes, but figured he was in control and knew what he was doing. Sunday came and I hopped, skipped and jumped and onto the MetroNorth train to take me home -- and on Monday my brother claimed his body at the morgue. He was hit head-on by a truck.

Never got on a motorcylce since and never will.
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Postby k1w1 » Sun, 18 Sep 2005 9:37 am

beenhere10years wrote:When I was quite young, I want to say 15 or 16 or so -- I was asked by a friend of my oldest brother's to help him out with a photo shoot in New York City. Now before you imagine Victoria's Secret lingerie ads, this was for educational film strips (does anyone remember those?) depicting verbs to use in primary schools in the US.

The photographer's name was Jerry and he was about 32, very promising career -- had already accumulated quite a portfolio. He was tall and handsome a rode a big bike, don't remember the make or model. For 2 days we zipped around the 5 boroughs of New York on his motorcycle: Manhattan, Brooklyn Heights, the Bronx to take photographs of me running, jumping, hopping, etc... Quite a heady experience for a young girl from the suburbs.

I was a bit rattled riding on the back of that bike, I have to tell you. In and out of traffic, splitting lanes, but figured he was in control and knew what he was doing. Sunday came and I hopped, skipped and jumped and onto the MetroNorth train to take me home -- and on Monday my brother claimed his body at the morgue. He was hit head-on by a truck.

Never got on a motorcylce since and never will.


I have goosebumps! That is unreal - it is things like that that make me believe in guardian angels...

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Postby Pinky » Sun, 18 Sep 2005 8:00 pm

beenhere10years wrote:When I was quite young, I want to say 15 or 16 or so -- I was asked by a friend of my oldest brother's to help him out with a photo shoot in New York City. Now before you imagine Victoria's Secret lingerie ads, this was for educational film strips (does anyone remember those?) depicting verbs to use in primary schools in the US.

The photographer's name was Jerry and he was about 32, very promising career -- had already accumulated quite a portfolio. He was tall and handsome a rode a big bike, don't remember the make or model. For 2 days we zipped around the 5 boroughs of New York on his motorcycle: Manhattan, Brooklyn Heights, the Bronx to take photographs of me running, jumping, hopping, etc... Quite a heady experience for a young girl from the suburbs.

I was a bit rattled riding on the back of that bike, I have to tell you. In and out of traffic, splitting lanes, but figured he was in control and knew what he was doing. Sunday came and I hopped, skipped and jumped and onto the MetroNorth train to take me home -- and on Monday my brother claimed his body at the morgue. He was hit head-on by a truck.

Never got on a motorcylce since and never will.


Had quite a bad accident about a month ago (and this is 10 years of riding on and off) along the AYE on my way to work.. Put me off riding for a while, and now I don't ride to work.. It is really dangerous and scary especially with all the big lorries / trailers around.

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Postby beenhere10years » Mon, 19 Sep 2005 7:01 am

I have a new found respect after my own little adventure a few months ago. The airbag saved my life, and of course the seat belt. I can't say I really needed a 'wake up call' I was always a pretty cautious driver. But I'll pay greater attention to the weather and road conditions ...
When you go in for a job interview, I think a good thing to ask is if they ever press charges.



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Postby Strong Eagle » Mon, 19 Sep 2005 7:42 am

There are very, very few situations where an "accident" cannot be avoided. An accident is the culmination of a chain of events and a series of decisions, and in that respect, is no "accident" at all. Rather, it is the logical outcome of a series of actions.

This is why it is so important to become a proficient motorcyclist... to be able to identify what is happening and to take the actions necessary to prevent the actions from culminating in an accident. From my motorcycle safety course I learned SIPDE:

Scan - continuously look for all the variables and happenings.
Identify - determine if any of the happenings can have negative consequences for you.
Plan - given the circumstances, what alternatives are available to you?
Decide - decide which plan of action you will take.
Execute - do what you have decided to do.

Combine this with a good understanding of factors which affect driving (and particularly motorcycling) and the chances of having an accident are no greater than having an airplane crash.

Lots of people insist that there is no way the accident could be avoided but I disagree with that. Even with my one and only accident (which was a whopper - http://www.herberts.org/wayne/valk/valkwreck.htm), in retrospect there were actions I should have taken to avoid the wreck. I did not pay enough attention to traffic coming the other way. I should have slowed even more when I saw the car begin to spin. I could have changed lanes. A split second is all it would have taken between a hit and a miss.

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Postby beenhere10years » Tue, 20 Sep 2005 9:33 am

Remind you of anyone?

Image
When you go in for a job interview, I think a good thing to ask is if they ever press charges.



-- jack handy

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 20 Sep 2005 9:38 am

beenhere10years wrote:Remind you of anyone?

Image


With all that fur around the face? :mrgreen:

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Postby beenhere10years » Tue, 20 Sep 2005 10:07 am

one more...

Image
When you go in for a job interview, I think a good thing to ask is if they ever press charges.



-- jack handy

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Postby beenhere10years » Tue, 20 Sep 2005 10:09 am

Strong Eagle wrote:There are very, very few situations where an "accident" cannot be avoided. An accident is the culmination of a chain of events and a series of decisions, and in that respect, is no "accident" at all. Rather, it is the logical outcome of a series of actions.

This is why it is so important to become a proficient motorcyclist... to be able to identify what is happening and to take the actions necessary to prevent the actions from culminating in an accident. From my motorcycle safety course I learned SIPDE:

Scan - continuously look for all the variables and happenings.
Identify - determine if any of the happenings can have negative consequences for you.
Plan - given the circumstances, what alternatives are available to you?
Decide - decide which plan of action you will take.
Execute - do what you have decided to do.

Combine this with a good understanding of factors which affect driving (and particularly motorcycling) and the chances of having an accident are no greater than having an airplane crash.

Lots of people insist that there is no way the accident could be avoided but I disagree with that. Even with my one and only accident (which was a whopper - http://www.herberts.org/wayne/valk/valkwreck.htm), in retrospect there were actions I should have taken to avoid the wreck. I did not pay enough attention to traffic coming the other way. I should have slowed even more when I saw the car begin to spin. I could have changed lanes. A split second is all it would have taken between a hit and a miss.


On a more serious note, I don't think your family will give rat's ass about any of this when they are throwing fistfuls of dirt on your coffin...
When you go in for a job interview, I think a good thing to ask is if they ever press charges.



-- jack handy

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Postby Strong Eagle » Tue, 20 Sep 2005 10:33 am

beenhere10years wrote:On a more serious note, I don't think your family will give rat's ass about any of this when they are throwing fistfuls of dirt on your coffin...


BH10Y, I can only say that I know lots of bikers who have travelled 100,000 to 500,000 miles without incident. And I know bikers who have wrapped themselves around a tree trying to negotiate a curvy road.

In examining the accidents, the differences are obvious. The accident free people are conservative riders. They are experienced and know how to ride the bike. They are 100 percent focused on riding. There is a cardnial rule... you can go fast but never be in a hurry... that will almost guarantee that you take a short cut that may cost you your life.

And the folks who had the wrecks? A lot of them rode beyond their ability. Still more had insufficent experience and really didn't know how to ride. I cringe when I see a guy on a Harley dog paddling to a stop. It means he is barely in control of the bike. I've seen guys on group rides who could not stay in the lane around a turn... marginally in control of the bike. I've seen guys more interested in twisting the throttle than checking for cars coming out of a side street. The list goes on, and every accident was avoidable.

So, it comes down to probabilities. And I can assure you that a trained, conservative, experienced rider has a far lower probability of a wreck than the motorcycling public in general.

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Postby Baron Greenback » Tue, 20 Sep 2005 10:36 am

Don't most accidents happen in the home - especially the kitchen? what are these people doing riding their bikes around indoors? Just asking for trouble if you ask me. :?
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