Singapore Expats

Benefits of Singaporean PR?

Moving to Singapore? Ask our regular expats in Singapore questions on relocation and their experience here. Ask about banking, employment pass, insurance, visa, work permit, citizenship or immigration issues.

Sponsored by:

Utrust Immigration
Post Reply
calebys

Benefits of Singaporean PR?

Post by calebys » Mon, 13 Jun 2005 5:34 pm

I am a US citizen and have recently received my employment pass here in Singapore. I was wondering if anyone can tell me is there any benefit for me to apply for a PR here in Singapore? I will be considered a "resident" when I am filing for taxes as I will have worked here greater than 1/2 year regardless of my PR status. I couldn't find anything as to the benefit of a foreign working being a Singaporean PR?

Thanks.

Javaguy
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed, 01 Jun 2005 1:52 pm
Location: Singapore

Post by Javaguy » Tue, 14 Jun 2005 1:27 pm

But in the first place you need to worry whether the government approve your PR application. Not everyone can get PR. Besides that, every Spore PR needs to contribute a certain percentage off the salary and additional contribution from the company you work for into CPF account.

User avatar
Strong Eagle
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 11667
Joined: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 12:13 am
Answers: 10
Location: Off The Red Dot
Contact:

Post by Strong Eagle » Tue, 14 Jun 2005 2:49 pm

The primary benefit of PR is that you are no longer tied to one company by your EP. You are free to change jobs, start your own business, etc. PR is renewed every 5 years, whereas EP is every three.

Conceivably, but somewhat unlikely, your EP could be pulled or not renewed if MOM were to determine that your particular job could now be filled locally. About the only way to lose your PR is to remain unemployed for an extended period of time.

As an EP you pay income tax but cannot contribute to CPF. As a PR, you must contribute to CPF, a small amount in the beginning but it will grow gradually. You get it all back, with accrued interest, when you give up your PR and leave the country. Some however, say that CPF is not a very good rate of return and you'll do better making your own savings plan.

As for the probability of getting PR: My sense is that if you are in a professional position, paying taxes, with the likelihood that you will continue to contribute to the economy, you'll get EP. It's supposed to be at least one year here, more often three, and some have gotten it in as little as 6 months.

calebys

Post by calebys » Tue, 14 Jun 2005 6:00 pm

Thanks. The info is most helpful. Yes, I did know about contributing to the long-term social security should I become a PR. Yes, the return on it is ridiculously low (I think right around inflation). Though, as a bonus, I suppose, my company will have to match my contributions (is that correct? dollar for dollar matching? is there an annual cap?).

So basically, from what I can gather, there are only three differences between EP and PR: 1) length of stay is 3 years (or rather, I have a 2 year EP) vs. the 5 years for PR, 2) contribution to the government's long-term savings plan and 3) I can switch jobs with a PR. Are there any additional tax or healthcare or whatever benefits that a PR can get that an EP holder is not qualified for?

Thanks.

User avatar
Yutenji
Chatter
Chatter
Posts: 180
Joined: Tue, 15 Jun 2004 5:50 pm
Location: Singapore

Post by Yutenji » Tue, 14 Jun 2005 11:42 pm

calebys wrote:Though, as a bonus, I suppose, my company will have to match my contributions (is that correct? dollar for dollar matching? is there an annual cap?).
So basically, from what I can gather, there are only three differences between EP and PR: 1) length of stay is 3 years (or rather, I have a 2 year EP) vs. the 5 years for PR, 2) contribution to the government's long-term savings plan and 3) I can switch jobs with a PR. Are there any additional tax or healthcare or whatever benefits that a PR can get that an EP holder is not qualified for?
Hi,
- Although your first PR is 5 years, subsequent ones can be for ten years.
- It's not dollar-for-dollar. Check the official website, but basically it's a percentage upto a cap. Currently the %-ages are 20% of your salary and (i think) 13% contribution by the company, UPTO THE FIRST S$5k. So you get S$1000 deducted (being 20% of 5k) which goes into CPF and the ompany adds another S$650 (being 13% of 5k). Note that both the cap and the company %-age are slowly dropping over the next few years. These are tax-free, so the company contribution should really be percieved as tax-free money-in-pocket.
- It's tough to quantify the benefits of PR (beyond those described above). It just makes life easier and opens a few more doors (or perhaps less close in your face). Perhaps the best argument is "why not?".

Good luck

calebys

Post by calebys » Wed, 15 Jun 2005 4:33 pm

Thanks. The company matching figures are good to know. Perhaps I'll try to get a PR. Anyone have any idea of how long the process will take? I've already had a couple of rather beaurocratic experiences during my brief time here, so I'd imagine it to take a bit longer. Theoretically, if I am a good candidate, would that help in terms of speeding up the process relative to other applicants? I'm not talking about preferential treatment, just whether it goes through more quickly.

I'm a single Chinese American with an MBA degree from a top school working at a financial MNC. Easier/faster to get approved? Yes? No? Makes no difference whatsoever?

calebys

Post by calebys » Wed, 15 Jun 2005 4:35 pm

Thanks. The company matching figures are good to know. Perhaps I'll try to get a PR. Anyone have any idea of how long the process will take? I've already had a couple of rather beaurocratic experiences during my brief time here, so I'd imagine it to take a bit longer. Theoretically, if I am a good candidate, would that help in terms of speeding up the process relative to other applicants? I'm not talking about preferential treatment, just whether it goes through more quickly.

I'm a single Chinese American with an MBA degree from a top school working at a financial MNC. Easier/faster to get approved? Yes? No? Makes no difference whatsoever?

Guest

Post by Guest » Wed, 15 Jun 2005 6:22 pm

calebys wrote:Thanks. The company matching figures are good to know. Perhaps I'll try to get a PR. Anyone have any idea of how long the process will take? I've already had a couple of rather beaurocratic experiences during my brief time here, so I'd imagine it to take a bit longer. Theoretically, if I am a good candidate, would that help in terms of speeding up the process relative to other applicants? I'm not talking about preferential treatment, just whether it goes through more quickly.

I'm a single Chinese American with an MBA degree from a top school working at a financial MNC. Easier/faster to get approved? Yes? No? Makes no difference whatsoever?
Hi, process is 'typically' about 2,3,4 months nowadays. I don't think being a good candidate makes the process faster, in fact maybe a little slower, because it's much faster to say 'No'! :lol: As a Chinese American with MBA ..... (imho) you'll get it with no problem!!
Good luck

Guest

Post by Guest » Wed, 15 Jun 2005 6:26 pm

malaysia no future to see wrote:For those who are already in oversea and live comfortably. There is no reason for you to come back to Malaysia. Life in Malaysia is getting tougher each day.

... ... ...

I'm sorry this sounds very racist but I think we have to be honest in discussion.
Dear malaysia no future to see,
Are you aware of the severe penalties for operating a PC while under the influence of mind-altering drugs? Your post, while fascinating, has NOTHING to do with the topic in hand. :? Have a nice day.

User avatar
Strong Eagle
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 11667
Joined: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 12:13 am
Answers: 10
Location: Off The Red Dot
Contact:

Post by Strong Eagle » Wed, 15 Jun 2005 6:32 pm

I believe there is one additional benefit of PR. You will be covered by Singapore's basic health care plan... which a lot of people supplement.

somethouht

Post by somethouht » Mon, 20 Jun 2005 1:51 pm

When I got my PR, my company deducted my pay to account for the Company's contribution to CPF.

I am not sure how other companies treat EP to PR conversion.

Have a nice day.

User avatar
jpatokal
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 3004
Joined: Tue, 09 Dec 2003 9:38 pm
Location: Terra Australis Incognita

Post by jpatokal » Mon, 20 Jun 2005 11:22 pm

calebys wrote:Theoretically, if I am a good candidate, would that help in terms of speeding up the process relative to other applicants? I'm not talking about preferential treatment, just whether it goes through more quickly.
I'm a single Chinese American with an MBA degree from a top school working at a financial MNC. Easier/faster to get approved? Yes? No? Makes no difference whatsoever?
You are precisely the kind of person they want and are almost certain to get your PR (plus an invitation to be a citizen a few years down the road). As processing time, there's also a country-based quota to complicate things, but Americans should be OK. One month if you're lucky, three if you aren't.

civon
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon, 12 Mar 2007 5:33 pm

Benefits of PR

Post by civon » Mon, 12 Mar 2007 5:51 pm

Have you heard of the latest incident about organ donation? I didn't know that Singapore PR have to have their organs removed for donation in the course of death by hospitals here......unless you want to opt out....
Information on this matter is not readily available.

User avatar
sundaymorningstaple
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 40437
Joined: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 1:26 pm
Answers: 21
Location: Retired on the Little Red Dot

Re: Benefits of PR

Post by sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 12 Mar 2007 6:35 pm

civon wrote:Have you heard of the latest incident about organ donation? I didn't know that Singapore PR have to have their organs removed for donation in the course of death by hospitals here......unless you want to opt out....
Information on this matter is not readily available.
And you don't have a clue as to what you are talking about.

http://www.moh.gov.sg/corp/systems/organ/hota/faqs.do

How is the public informed about HOTA?
Currently, Singaporeans and Singapore Permanent Residents who turn 21 years of age, or foreigners who obtain Singapore citizenship or permanent residence status will receive a letter from MOH informing them that they will be included under HOTA. They are also told that they can opt out if they object to having their organs removed upon death. MOH also informs the general public of HOTA twice a year through the main local newspapers in the 4 official languages.

With the passage of the Human Organ (Amendment) Bill, the Ministry embarked on a 6-month publicity campaign on the revised HOTA. The Ministry of Health also sent information brochures on the revised HOTA to every household.

For persons who have previously objected to the removal of their kidneys under HOTA, their objections are still valid. However, they would have to opt out for the other organs if they do not wish to donate them upon their death.
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

User avatar
Strong Eagle
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 11667
Joined: Sat, 10 Jul 2004 12:13 am
Answers: 10
Location: Off The Red Dot
Contact:

Post by Strong Eagle » Mon, 12 Mar 2007 7:17 pm

somethouht wrote:When I got my PR, my company deducted my pay to account for the Company's contribution to CPF.

I am not sure how other companies treat EP to PR conversion.

Have a nice day.
If the company is deducting their portion of CPF they are performing an illegal act.

CPF is capped at 33 percent of $4500 monthly salary. 13 percent is paid by the employer, 20 percent by the employee. Thus, if you were making $8,000, I would withhold 20 percent of your pay up to $4500 ($900), and write you a check for $7,100. I would have to pay 13 percent of $4500 ($585). The payment I make to CPF is $1,485.

I think you are being stiffed.

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “Relocating, Moving to Singapore”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests