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9 year old US girl kills.WHat's wrong with American society?

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9 year old US girl kills.WHat's wrong with American society?

Postby CNN News » Wed, 01 Jun 2005 10:00 pm

These news are aplenty. Like teenagers shooting up their school a la Columbine slayings.
Now the question is what is wrong with American society. Is this becos they are more evolveD?????

:shock: :shock: :shock:
.............................................
Neighbors Saw Anger in Girl, 9, Accused in Killing

The New York Times
June 1, 2005

The 9-year-old girl's mother was gone only briefly Monday, running upstairs to the 11th floor to borrow a hair-straightening comb to help give the girl braids before a barbecue downstairs in the courtyard.

The girl was playing with one of her closest friends, with whom she spent so much time that some thought they were related, an 11-year-old named Queen Washington. Everyone called her Queenie. In the 9-year-old's apartment on the seventh floor of the Linden Houses in East New York, Brooklyn, the two girls began to fight over a ball, the police said.

As any parent will tell, even the gentlest child has an occasional tantrum. But the 9-year-old, while bright and inventive, struck some of her neighbors as a different kind, a girl who often showed flashes of nasty, violent anger when she did not get her way.

"As long as things go in her favor, she was a sweet, beautiful young girl," said Kahindà Lannigan, 42, a retired home care worker who lives in the girl's building. "But when the tides were in favor of other children, she'll hit, kick, scratch, scream and spit. She'd hit anyone on the head with a bottle if she was fighting. She'd beat them any way she could."

Still, the adults who knew her said yesterday, no one would imagine her capable of killing.

The police said the 9-year-old stabbed Queenie in the chest with a steak knife. The blade perforated the older girl's heart, killing her as she stumbled out of the apartment and tried to make it to the elevator down the hall, the police said.

The 9-year-old appeared in court yesterday afternoon in a white T-shirt and blue jeans and with her hair pulled up, mistakenly taking a seat at the prosecution's table until she was directed to the defense table next to her mother. In a quiet voice, she stated her name and her age for the record.

Her defense lawyer, Nicole Barnum, said she expected that the girl would be formally charged with manslaughter. The girl was taken to a juvenile detention center.

After she was stabbed on Monday, Queenie made it about 40 feet down the narrow hall before she collapsed onto the pale linoleum. A neighbor, Dakim Hunter, 24, was at home when a friend knocked on the door and asked, "Why is that little girl lying on the ground?" Mr. Hunter immediately recognized Queenie, her chin to the ground, and when the two men prodded her and tried to lift her up, they saw blood on her shirt and called 911.

"When I called her name, all she said was, 'Uh,' " Mr. Hunter said. "Those were her last words."

Meanwhile, the 9-year-old girl seems to have walked past her fallen friend and stumbled, dazed and barefoot, outside, standing for a time beside a police and fire call box on Wortman Avenue in front of her building at No. 185, neighbors said.

"She looked very scared and confused," said one neighbor, Michelle Figgs.

Inside the building, her older brother, who is 15, ran out of the apartment and upstairs to the 11th floor and told his mother that his sister had stabbed Queenie. The two rushed back downstairs to their apartment, with the girl's mother hysterical, crying and vomiting, Mr. Hunter said. The girl's mother had been in the upstairs apartment for only four minutes or so, said Thomas Davis, 23, the neighbor who had lent the comb.

The two girls mostly got along fine, neighbors said, although Mr. Davis said that they scrapped at a birthday party two months ago, and that the 9-year-old's mother had told Queenie's mother, " 'If you keep bringing her over here, they're going to keep fighting.' "

And yet, as recently as Sunday, the two girls could be seen playing together. They stopped Kiara Scott, 19, a former baby sitter for the 9-year-old, and asked her to help them make up a dance to a hip-hop song. "They said 'Come back later,' and I didn't," Ms. Scott said. "Anything can happen in the blink of an eye."

The baby sitter, and others, described the 9-year-old as a bright and pleasant girl when things were going her way. She liked playing a children's game on the family Nintendo, and otherwise spent her free time as many other girls do: "Listen to music, dance, or go to a friend's house in the building or go outside in back of the building and play," Ms. Scott said. The 9-year-old and her older brother were close, and she took care of her younger brother, neighbors said.

But considering that anonymity is the norm in most New York apartment buildings, the girl made an impression on a remarkable number of her neighbors, largely because of her outbursts.

Ms. Lannigan, the neighbor, repeated a story circulating in the building about a confrontation between the girl and a teacher over a stolen cellphone. Teachers and others at the girl's school would not discuss her yesterday.

Ms. Lannigan said Queenie looked out for her younger friend: "Queenie would jump in and fight for her." For that reason, the killing stunned her all the more, she said. "I can't believe it would happen to her, because she was the only one who would tolerate and play with her," Ms. Lannigan said.

Another neighbor, Diva McPhatter, 44, a food pantry worker who lives on the same floor as the 9-year-old and her family, said she saw the girl break a glass juice bottle and use it to threaten another girl in the park near the building last summer. "She broke it and told the girl she was going to kill her," and called her an obscenity, Ms. McPhatter said.

One schoolmate, a 10-year-old boy, said the girl gave him his first and only black eye.

On average, about six children under the age of 10 have committed murder or non-negligent homicide a year in the United States since 1976, said James Alan Fox, a professor of criminal justice at Northeastern University in Boston. "They do occur," he said, "but they are rare."

The girl eventually left where she was standing by the call box, went back in the building and, still barefoot, went to Mr. Davis's apartment on the 11th floor, looking for her mother, Mr. Davis said. She told the man, " 'I had a fight with my cousin. I just stabbed her,' " he said. He asked her where, and she said she did not know. A neighbor arrived to take her downstairs.

By the time she returned to the seventh floor, the police were there, and they would not allow her into the apartment, Mr. Hunter said. "She was crying. She was saying, 'I want my mother,' " he said.

Yesterday in court, mother and daughter embraced for more than 10 seconds as the hearing began, with the girl's mother saying, "Oh, my baby." And after, they hugged again, the mother telling her daughter, "I love you, baby."

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Postby Strong Eagle » Wed, 01 Jun 2005 10:27 pm

Why do the actions of one small child, whose mental condition, upbringing, and history are unknown to us, have any bearing upon American society?

For every sensationalistic negative that you see, there are hundreds more positives that go unreported.

I'm not saying that there aren't problems, like poverty, inadequate parenting skills, and institutionalized attitudes that need to rectified.

I am saying that it is pathetic for an individual to take one tragic incident and broadbrush smear 300 million diverse people with it. You display an abominable ignorance.

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Postby Mr`joker » Fri, 03 Jun 2005 3:13 am

so whats new?
is there anything can be done about it?

just so you know that happens in many countries too :roll: not just America

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Postby onggie » Fri, 03 Jun 2005 5:24 am

Well.. for one... as a singaporean.. i have to say.. our society is very sheltered... prob that's why this is like a shocker to u..
Well mr joker is right.. happens everywhere else as well... just not on our small lil island :P

Guest102

Postby Guest102 » Fri, 03 Jun 2005 3:38 pm

Yep doesn't say much about American Society. This week in the UK some 11 year olds were arrested for the attempted murder of a 5 year old.

Guest

Postby Guest » Fri, 03 Jun 2005 4:35 pm

Competing is a primitive instinct mould in our brains by evolution.

non-flame

Postby non-flame » Mon, 06 Jun 2005 4:00 pm

All flames aside, I'm speaking as objectively and neutral as possible.

I think American society should seriously take a good, hard look at the situation when parents and teachers are not allowed to use physical punishment on their children; and parents are prone to sue the schools for punishing their kids and again for not keeping order in the schools.

Also, all other countries (yes, that includes Singapore) should think carefully whether we want to go down that road.

That brings to mind an earlier thread on this forum quibbling over the case of the police handcuffing an uncontrollable little girl, who had brought a whole school to a standstill for the whole day. Any sensible person would have handed out a good careful slap and that would have ended the matter quick and sharp.

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Postby Guest » Mon, 06 Jun 2005 5:40 pm

non-flame wrote:All flames aside, I'm speaking as objectively and neutral as possible.

I think American society should seriously take a good, hard look at the situation when parents and teachers are not allowed to use physical punishment on their children; and parents are prone to sue the schools for punishing their kids and again for not keeping order in the schools.

Also, all other countries (yes, that includes Singapore) should think carefully whether we want to go down that road.

That brings to mind an earlier thread on this forum quibbling over the case of the police handcuffing an uncontrollable little girl, who had brought a whole school to a standstill for the whole day. Any sensible person would have handed out a good careful slap and that would have ended the matter quick and sharp.


I am afraid Singapore is heading in the same direction. Nowadays, our kids are not afraid of teachers any more. They know their rights and will make a report to the police or the ministry with the slightest punishment from their teachers. Most teachers are afraid to punish the students even if they misbehaved.

To make matter worse, most parents are siding with their kids. They won't want anybody to touch their kids. So, who is able to control them?


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