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PR Approval Chance (2022)?

Relocating, travelling or planning to make Singapore home? Discuss the criterias, passes or visa that is required.
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AquaLapis0
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PR Approval Chance (2022)?

Post by AquaLapis0 » Sat, 12 Mar 2022 1:02 am

Hi everyone, first time posting here. Just wanted to try to get some insight onto the chances of PR approval:
Ethnicity: Indian (born in India)
Age: 24
Length of Stay: Continuous 19 years in Singapore, came here when I was 5 years old
Education: International School for all years of education + NUS BBA Accounting + BComp Information Systems, First Class Honours
Work experience: 3 years related to Fintech industry, 7.2k a month
Unmarried
If it matters, other information: Parents also stayed in Singapore as a family for 19 years, applied for PR 4 times (all rejected), latest attempt 2016. I speculate that Indian quota has something to do with it, but my father was 51 at the time of first application itself, so too old (salary was 168k per annum in Marine Engineering). They both still reside in SG, Father on EP and mother DP.

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Re: PR Approval Chance (2022)?

Post by Ignorant1 » Sat, 12 Mar 2022 10:49 pm

this is quite surprising. Any chance that your family got invite for Pr in 2005-2007 and they dint respond or said no ?

AquaLapis0
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Re: PR Approval Chance (2022)?

Post by AquaLapis0 » Sun, 13 Mar 2022 12:13 am

Ignorant1 wrote:
Sat, 12 Mar 2022 10:49 pm
this is quite surprising. Any chance that your family got invite for Pr in 2005-2007 and they dint respond or said no ?
Asked my father once again, he said no, he never received any invitation. If I remember correctly we did first apply around that same time. We too were quite surprised, because we applied in the time when they were still relatively lax in giving out PRs. But we never got it in the end. Starting to wonder if they'll see my application differently or not, as I've lived for nearly 2 decades and graduated from top local uni.

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sundaymorningstaple
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Re: PR Approval Chance (2022)?

Post by sundaymorningstaple » Sun, 13 Mar 2022 9:25 am

With regard to your parents rejections, if your father was 51 the first time he applied for PR, then the rejection and subsequent rejection are to be expected as anecdotally, it is extremely rare for someone over the age of 45 to obtain PR. As he is not in an industry that is "critical" in the eyes of where the government wants to go, his expertise is not in short supply here. And there is the possibility that racial quotas may have contributed but in this case, I think it was more age & industry related.

However, in your case, I see a different scenario, which is probably a fair bit of quota issues but i also see another potential issue that was not apparent to me for a long time but as I'm now 74 it is staring me in the face, not so much PR as I am already that for over a quarter of a century. Picture this. You parents are/were rejected 4x thus far and mainly age related. For whatever the reason, if they give you PR it is a good possibility that you will ultimately gain SGC (if you want it). With that comes the possibility of applying for citizenship for your parents who are now senior citizens and there is a category for aged parents of SGCs (check out the ICA site). I've thought about using that vehicle myself as I have two children, both married with kids here now so they can act as my sponsor. While I already have PR makes it a shoe-in, but where the stumbling block for you, becoming a PR, it's on the pathway of also opening themselves up for collateral damages in increased healthcare costs as your parents are around my age, I'm guessing. By giving you PR they are opening up a potential can of worms as they have enough medical issues right now without arbitrarily potentially adding more.

I'm not saying this is fact, or fiction, but you have been here and educated well for 2 decades. It is a feasible position for the government to take. Giving you PR is the starting step in that direction as they obviously have had a reason to reject 4x and I'm guessing it's age related.

The other problem is one of NS. If your father has been on an EP for all those years, and you were in International Schools, does this mean you have never been on a Dependent's Pass but on a Student's visa all those years? Also can I assume you didn't have any sort of grants to attend NUS? If your father did a number on you by keeping you off of a dependents pass so you could remain under the radar, it is going to be the straw that broke the camel's back as it were. You will not likely get PR because it will be potentially seen as you deliberately evaded NS and now want to eat you cake as well. Again, I am just pointing out 40 years of dealing with HR issues and my own in the process (I had two children born here with dual citizenship so had a lot of hurdles to deal with). I would still, in your case, apply for PR as it's is still worth a try but I wanted to try to help you see some of the pitfalls ahead. Good Luck.

SMS
SOME PEOPLE TRY TO TURN BACK THEIR ODOMETERS. NOT ME. I WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW WHY I LOOK THIS WAY. I'VE TRAVELED A LONG WAY, AND SOME OF THE ROADS WEREN'T PAVED. ~ Will Rogers

AquaLapis0
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Re: PR Approval Chance (2022)?

Post by AquaLapis0 » Sun, 13 Mar 2022 11:37 am

sundaymorningstaple wrote:
Sun, 13 Mar 2022 9:25 am
With regard to your parents rejections, if your father was 51 the first time he applied for PR, then the rejection and subsequent rejection are to be expected as anecdotally, it is extremely rare for someone over the age of 45 to obtain PR. As he is not in an industry that is "critical" in the eyes of where the government wants to go, his expertise is not in short supply here. And there is the possibility that racial quotas may have contributed but in this case, I think it was more age & industry related.

However, in your case, I see a different scenario, which is probably a fair bit of quota issues but i also see another potential issue that was not apparent to me for a long time but as I'm now 74 it is staring me in the face, not so much PR as I am already that for over a quarter of a century. Picture this. You parents are/were rejected 4x thus far and mainly age related. For whatever the reason, if they give you PR it is a good possibility that you will ultimately gain SGC (if you want it). With that comes the possibility of applying for citizenship for your parents who are now senior citizens and there is a category for aged parents of SGCs (check out the ICA site). I've thought about using that vehicle myself as I have two children, both married with kids here now so they can act as my sponsor. While I already have PR makes it a shoe-in, but where the stumbling block for you, becoming a PR, it's on the pathway of also opening themselves up for collateral damages in increased healthcare costs as your parents are around my age, I'm guessing. By giving you PR they are opening up a potential can of worms as they have enough medical issues right now without arbitrarily potentially adding more.

I'm not saying this is fact, or fiction, but you have been here and educated well for 2 decades. It is a feasible position for the government to take. Giving you PR is the starting step in that direction as they obviously have had a reason to reject 4x and I'm guessing it's age related.

The other problem is one of NS. If your father has been on an EP for all those years, and you were in International Schools, does this mean you have never been on a Dependent's Pass but on a Student's visa all those years? Also can I assume you didn't have any sort of grants to attend NUS? If your father did a number on you by keeping you off of a dependents pass so you could remain under the radar, it is going to be the straw that broke the camel's back as it were. You will not likely get PR because it will be potentially seen as you deliberately evaded NS and now want to eat you cake as well. Again, I am just pointing out 40 years of dealing with HR issues and my own in the process (I had two children born here with dual citizenship so had a lot of hurdles to deal with). I would still, in your case, apply for PR as it's is still worth a try but I wanted to try to help you see some of the pitfalls ahead. Good Luck.

SMS
Thanks a lot for your insight into my situation! I appreciate it!

So about the potential issues that you point out: I was on a Dependent’s Pass for all 12 years of school, and my parents also included my own and my sister’s name in the application as we applied as a family (sister moved to Australia). My parents included our names in all the applications to make sure that the government knows that their children are willing to stay in SG as PR, and me willing to do NS. The only time I was on a Student Pass was during university.
And about my time in NUS, I actually was on a tuition grant, the MOE tuition grant for international students. I completed my bond for working in Singapore very recently, so I thought that now would be a good time to apply for PR, because I have paid taxes for 3 years and completed the bond.

And yes, I see that it is a potential liability that my aged parents will be adding onto the healthcare burden here. It’s a real problem, but the saving grace is that they have atleast lived here for a very long time, paid taxes and no criminal record, albeit being old.

Also just a small clarification; what occupations or industry sectors do you think the government actively seeks out? Unlike other countries that publish their list of skilled occupation shortages, Singapore (understandably) does not reveal its preferred occupations. I work in Fintech and am not sure if that comes under their preference list.

Anyways I’ll still try my luck, with the quota and all. At the minimum I do know that I’m not a very common applicant to come by, as I have been living my entire life in Singapore and been educated well here. But then again, who knows?

Thanks once again for the response!

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