Does the government consider race when granting PR?

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Cameron_
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Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by Cameron_ » Sat, 03 Jul 2021 3:52 pm

Does race influence whether or not you can be granted PR? If so, to what extent is it considered? Are certain racial groups given preference over others?

I've seen mixed answers and at this point I don't know what's correct.

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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by MOCHS » Sat, 03 Jul 2021 5:19 pm

There’s the CMIO race quota (Chinese, Malay, Indian, Others) to maintain the social fabric of Singapore. Majority of the quota is allocated to the Chinese, then Malays, followed by Indians, and the smallest percentage goes to Others.

So, imagine if you’re in the Others quota and (for example) 1000 PR spots are allocated to Others every year but 5000 Others applicants apply for PR in one particular year, then there’s only a 20% chance of success.

Then number of applicants applying for each racial group does matter.
Last edited by MOCHS on Sat, 03 Jul 2021 5:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by Cameron_ » Sat, 03 Jul 2021 5:22 pm

MOCHS wrote:
Sat, 03 Jul 2021 5:19 pm
There’s the CMIO race quota (Chinese, Malay, Indian, Others) to maintain the social fabric of Singapore. Majority of the quota is allocated to the Chinese, then Malays, followed by Indians, and the smallest percentage goes to Others.

So, imagine if you’re in the Others quota and (for example) 1000 PR is granted to Others every year but 5000 Others applicants apply for PR in one particular year, then there’s only a 20% chance of success.
Is there any data available on the the number of "Others" living in Singapore as non-residents, or any data on how many others apply for PR? I'm trying to get a rough idea of my odds of getting PR in the distant future, and I'm having a hard time finding any data. The SG gov's census website only showed ethnic data for residents, which makes it difficult to gauge how many people from a given ethic group apply per year.

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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by MOCHS » Sat, 03 Jul 2021 5:30 pm

The news only says how many PRs are granted per year, it does not say how many people applied or the breakdown of the race of the applicants/PRs granted.

This report states the percentage of citizens and non-residents amongst other things and gives race breakdown for citizens only but not for non-citizens.

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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by sundaymorningstaple » Sun, 04 Jul 2021 12:20 am

Cameron_ wrote:
Sat, 03 Jul 2021 5:22 pm
MOCHS wrote:
Sat, 03 Jul 2021 5:19 pm
There’s the CMIO race quota (Chinese, Malay, Indian, Others) to maintain the social fabric of Singapore. Majority of the quota is allocated to the Chinese, then Malays, followed by Indians, and the smallest percentage goes to Others.

So, imagine if you’re in the Others quota and (for example) 1000 PR is granted to Others every year but 5000 Others applicants apply for PR in one particular year, then there’s only a 20% chance of success.
Is there any data available on the the number of "Others" living in Singapore as non-residents, or any data on how many others apply for PR? I'm trying to get a rough idea of my odds of getting PR in the distant future, and I'm having a hard time finding any data. The SG gov's census website only showed ethnic data for residents, which makes it difficult to gauge how many people from a given ethic group apply per year.
Aside from Residents and SGCitizens, the rest are transient in nature. Why would they bother to keep track of failed applications. That is useless data that is of no use to anybody, yourself included. The same person may have applied every years (in fact, we have one recent post this week who made 6 application in 10 years. do you want to count that person as 6 people? Or the applicant who applied knowing he contract wasn't being renewed, so as a last ditch effort put in an application, "just because". You are clutching at straws. Also, there is the ebb and flow of transient bodies here depending on the economic conditions from one year to the next. Lots of people here applied over the past 1.5 years due to covid. Should open skies and borders happen in 2022, there will be as massive influx of Foreign Talent to replace those who left because their companies shut down and likely, closed for good or moved to another country. You are tilting at windmills.

Oh, in regard to you 5000/1000 example....... If you have lesser qualifications than the 1st 1000 who apply, you have zero chances. Not everybody applying had the same quals, experience, industry, nationality, race or religion OR can also easily assimilated into Singapore. There is more to it than just a numbers game.
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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by malcontent » Sun, 04 Jul 2021 1:44 pm

For “others” race, I’d say those from ASEAN might have a slight edge over non-ASEAN.

But keep in mind that money talks. The others pool includes some highly paid western expats, and like SMS said, an influx of them in 2022 could greatly impact the success of “others” applying for PR.
It’s not what happens to you, but how you react to it that matters ~ Epictetus

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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by tiktok » Sun, 04 Jul 2021 3:29 pm

MOCHS wrote:
Sat, 03 Jul 2021 5:19 pm
There’s the CMIO race quota (Chinese, Malay, Indian, Others) to maintain the social fabric of Singapore. Majority of the quota is allocated to the Chinese, then Malays, followed by Indians, and the smallest percentage goes to Others.
Hmm, what other countries have used racial quotas to "preserve the social fabric"?
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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by the observer » Sun, 04 Jul 2021 3:31 pm

tiktok wrote:
Sun, 04 Jul 2021 3:29 pm
MOCHS wrote:
Sat, 03 Jul 2021 5:19 pm
There’s the CMIO race quota (Chinese, Malay, Indian, Others) to maintain the social fabric of Singapore. Majority of the quota is allocated to the Chinese, then Malays, followed by Indians, and the smallest percentage goes to Others.
Hmm, what other countries have used racial quotas to "preserve the social fabric"?
Malaysia.
Thailand and Indonesia chose to assimilate one and all, in name at the very least.
Despite assimilating, 1997 was pretty devastating for the Chinese community in Indonesia.

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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by tiktok » Sun, 04 Jul 2021 9:39 pm

Fair point, but religion cannot be ignored in Indonesia's case. Singapore should adopt a first world merit based immigration policy. Race quotas do nothing for nation building, they only help the government stay in power.
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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by the observer » Sun, 04 Jul 2021 11:06 pm

Other than losing more seats, I foresee further racial tensions. It is what it is, if the existing racial compositions are done away.

The facilities are 1st world, but there’s a whole lot of people here (new and old) who are from the 3rd world.

There’s the saying, you can take a person out of the village, but you can’t take the village out of him/her.

And bulk of new immigrants, PRs, EPs, new citizens etc are from… 3rd world. So that mindset will be almost impossible to change.

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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by smoulder » Mon, 05 Jul 2021 2:01 am

the observer wrote:
Sun, 04 Jul 2021 11:06 pm
Other than losing more seats, I foresee further racial tensions. It is what it is, if the existing racial compositions are done away.

The facilities are 1st world, but there’s a whole lot of people here (new and old) who are from the 3rd world.

There’s the saying, you can take a person out of the village, but you can’t take the village out of him/her.

And bulk of new immigrants, PRs, EPs, new citizens etc are from… 3rd world. So that mindset will be almost impossible to change.
The flip side - if you bring in a whole lot of more affluent western new citizens (obviously not the riff raff), there would be a whole lot of gentrification which could lead to even more tension with some existing citizens. I guess this is the racial tension that you alluded to in the first sentence?

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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by the observer » Mon, 05 Jul 2021 7:25 am

Hypothesis. Probable.

But as is, you can allude that there’s a correlation between immigration numbers and paps vote share, which even the gahmen has acknowledged.

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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by tiktok » Mon, 05 Jul 2021 11:33 am

smoulder wrote:
Mon, 05 Jul 2021 2:01 am
The flip side - if you bring in a whole lot of more affluent western new citizens (obviously not the riff raff), there would be a whole lot of gentrification which could lead to even more tension with some existing citizens. I guess this is the racial tension that you alluded to in the first sentence?
Are you talking about riots when kopitiams are replaced by bistros and wine bars? :D

Seriously we already have tension from less than gentrified westerners - maskless MRT British guy for example. The solution is strictly merit based immigration. Let rule of law deal with societal issues.
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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by smoulder » Mon, 05 Jul 2021 12:02 pm

the observer wrote:
Mon, 05 Jul 2021 7:25 am
Hypothesis. Probable.

But as is, you can allude that there’s a correlation between immigration numbers and paps vote share, which even the gahmen has acknowledged.
Yes agreed. I think so too. As it is, even in the current scenario, you can see a lot of discontent about the present bunch of immigrants - the ones from the the 3rd world who are sometimes viewed as too snooty and some of the westerners like the unmasked British guy in the mrt. On the former category - the government is now trying hard to change the perception or correct it but we all know that it has been quite hard to do that.

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Re: Does the government consider race when granting PR?

Post by malcontent » Mon, 05 Jul 2021 12:24 pm

tiktok wrote:
Sun, 04 Jul 2021 9:39 pm
Singapore should adopt a first world merit based immigration policy. Race quotas do nothing for nation building, they only help the government stay in power.
Seems like a delicate balance. Too much merit and the locals feel they can’t compete. Too different in appearance or culture and the locals feel displaced. Too little merit and locals feel they are being burdened. The list goes on…
It’s not what happens to you, but how you react to it that matters ~ Epictetus

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