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When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

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byseeksconseil1
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When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

Postby byseeksconseil1 » Fri, 09 Feb 2018 1:17 pm

My original plan was to inform my supervisors of my intention to resign in the first 2 weeks of April, and submit my formal resignation to HR in the same period. This will allow me to leave Singapore in early July (we have a 3-month notice requirement).

However, there is an annual performance appraisal meeting coming up next month. During that meeting, I will discuss with the supervisors my work in the past year, and also my plans for the next few years.

Now I am torn between three options (although 2a and 2b are related):
1) Sticking to the original plan. During the appraisal meeting, I will discuss the "future" as if I were to remain the same company. The disadvantage of this plan is that I essentially will have to lie about my "future plans", and they will shortly find out a few weeks later when I resign. The advantage of this plan is that I will only deal with 3 months of discomfort and awkwardness that arises after you resign.

2a) Inform them of my intention to resign before the appraisal meeting in March (but submit the formal resignation to HR as originally planned – in early April). Then, they can decide whether to even conduct the appraisal for me.

2b) Inform them of my intention to resign DURING the appraisal meeting (but submit the formal resignation to HR as originally planned - in early April). The disadvantage of this approach is that it will come as as shock to them during the meeting, so probably not a good idea.

I think 2a is the better approach, but I would like to collect other people's opinions on this issue as well. Thanks.

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Re: When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

Postby PNGMK » Fri, 09 Feb 2018 2:49 pm

Are you likely to be put on garden leave for the three months?
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byseeksconseil1
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Re: When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

Postby byseeksconseil1 » Fri, 09 Feb 2018 5:25 pm

PNGMK wrote:Are you likely to be put on garden leave for the three months?


No, I don't think so, although I wish it would be the case.

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Re: When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

Postby PNGMK » Sun, 11 Feb 2018 8:23 am

byseeksconseil1 wrote:
PNGMK wrote:Are you likely to be put on garden leave for the three months?


No, I don't think so, although I wish it would be the case.


Tell them you are taking a job with a competitor. That may trigger it or at worse they may put you on minimal duties but they'd be idiots to keep you in the building in this case.
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Re: When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

Postby The Ref » Sun, 11 Feb 2018 8:56 pm

Both 2a and 2b options are good. That way the management has the ability to direct 100% of the bonus you would have received to the other staff who are staying, thus making them happier. Who cares if you get no bonus, you are leaving anyway.

byseeksconseil1 wrote:My original plan was to inform my supervisors of my intention to resign in the first 2 weeks of April, and submit my formal resignation to HR in the same period. This will allow me to leave Singapore in early July (we have a 3-month notice requirement).

However, there is an annual performance appraisal meeting coming up next month. During that meeting, I will discuss with the supervisors my work in the past year, and also my plans for the next few years.

Now I am torn between three options (although 2a and 2b are related):
1) Sticking to the original plan. During the appraisal meeting, I will discuss the "future" as if I were to remain the same company. The disadvantage of this plan is that I essentially will have to lie about my "future plans", and they will shortly find out a few weeks later when I resign. The advantage of this plan is that I will only deal with 3 months of discomfort and awkwardness that arises after you resign.

2a) Inform them of my intention to resign before the appraisal meeting in March (but submit the formal resignation to HR as originally planned – in early April). Then, they can decide whether to even conduct the appraisal for me.

2b) Inform them of my intention to resign DURING the appraisal meeting (but submit the formal resignation to HR as originally planned - in early April). The disadvantage of this approach is that it will come as as shock to them during the meeting, so probably not a good idea.

I think 2a is the better approach, but I would like to collect other people's opinions on this issue as well. Thanks.

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Re: When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

Postby Strong Eagle » Mon, 12 Feb 2018 4:51 am

The Ref wrote:Both 2a and 2b options are good. That way the management has the ability to direct 100% of the bonus you would have received to the other staff who are staying, thus making them happier. Who cares if you get no bonus, you are leaving anyway.


I hope that the Ref is joking or at least speaking with tongue in cheek, and I judge that he has a big tongue in a big cheek. Bonuses are awarded for past performance, not future performance. Why would you give up on a bonus if you are entitled to one? Let management come up with more $$$ to pay bonuses to others.

Therefore, if you are entitled to a bonus, I would choose the strategy that ensures you will collect yours.

Who cares if it "comes as shock to them"? Think about this: No matter when you tell them you are leaving, it will be a shock... or not. They would not hesitate to "shock" you if they decided to make you redundant.

Only you know all the circumstances, how good the company is, how trustworthy your bosses are. And, ALWAYS work for your own maximum advantage. If there is a bonus, figure out how to quit and get the bonus. In other words, get your appraisal and your bonus, then announce your intentions. If there is no bonus, then as PNGMK said, figure out how to convince them to let you leave early and pay you.

There is absolutely no point in leaving anything on the table when negotiating with a company. They would do the same if the tables were turned.

So, for me, option 1. Do the appraisal, then quit. You are under no obligation to make them happy happy, and in any event, you may be misreading their potential reactions.

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Re: When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

Postby Wd40 » Mon, 12 Feb 2018 8:35 am

OP hasn't spoken anything about the bonus. From his post it appears, he is talking about the appraisal setting for 2018 and "future plans" as he put it. I am pretty sure his bonus has been banked already.

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Re: When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

Postby Strong Eagle » Mon, 12 Feb 2018 9:29 am

Wd40 wrote:OP hasn't spoken anything about the bonus. From his post it appears, he is talking about the appraisal setting for 2018 and "future plans" as he put it. I am pretty sure his bonus has been banked already.

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Is that a SWAG?

byseeksconseil1
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Re: When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

Postby byseeksconseil1 » Mon, 12 Feb 2018 10:01 pm

Strong Eagle wrote:
The Ref wrote:Both 2a and 2b options are good. That way the management has the ability to direct 100% of the bonus you would have received to the other staff who are staying, thus making them happier. Who cares if you get no bonus, you are leaving anyway.


I hope that the Ref is joking or at least speaking with tongue in cheek, and I judge that he has a big tongue in a big cheek. Bonuses are awarded for past performance, not future performance. Why would you give up on a bonus if you are entitled to one? Let management come up with more $$$ to pay bonuses to others.

Therefore, if you are entitled to a bonus, I would choose the strategy that ensures you will collect yours.

Who cares if it "comes as shock to them"? Think about this: No matter when you tell them you are leaving, it will be a shock... or not. They would not hesitate to "shock" you if they decided to make you redundant.

Only you know all the circumstances, how good the company is, how trustworthy your bosses are. And, ALWAYS work for your own maximum advantage. If there is a bonus, figure out how to quit and get the bonus. In other words, get your appraisal and your bonus, then announce your intentions. If there is no bonus, then as PNGMK said, figure out how to convince them to let you leave early and pay you.

There is absolutely no point in leaving anything on the table when negotiating with a company. They would do the same if the tables were turned.

So, for me, option 1. Do the appraisal, then quit. You are under no obligation to make them happy happy, and in any event, you may be misreading their potential reactions.


Thanks. I didn't mention the issue of bonus as I didn't want to make the post longer than it already was. So the situation is this: our year for appraisal purposes runs from last July to the end of this June. Even without the issue of resignation, it is not the case that everyone will get a bonus. Apparently, the boss at the department ranks everyone, and then submits the ranking to HR who then has the discretion to make adjustments (based on what, I don't know) before assigning a final grade for everyone. Those who receive the lowest grade of ranking do not receive a bonus. The bonus is paid at the end of July.

However, our former boss said that if this is your last year, then they will automatically give you the lowest grade (He himself submitted his resignation in August).

This is all I know about performance bonuses. I do not know how to find out more without making them suspicious.

So the surest way to maximize the chance of receiving the performance bonus is to wait until the end of July to resign. However, that conflicts with my plan to leave Singapore in July.

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Re: When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

Postby PNGMK » Tue, 13 Feb 2018 6:48 am

IF you contract does not explicitly state a punishment (i.e. a payback or clawback clause). for not serving notice then I would risk giving notice after you get your bonus and not showing up (i.e. fly out). Your tax matters will be an issue but can be resolved remotely. I would state you are working for a competitor in your notice and you assume it's best for both parties sake you no longer have accesss to company data etc.
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byseeksconseil1
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Re: When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

Postby byseeksconseil1 » Wed, 14 Feb 2018 10:52 pm

PNGMK wrote:IF you contract does not explicitly state a punishment (i.e. a payback or clawback clause). for not serving notice then I would risk giving notice after you get your bonus and not showing up (i.e. fly out). Your tax matters will be an issue but can be resolved remotely. I would state you are working for a competitor in your notice and you assume it's best for both parties sake you no longer have accesss to company data etc.


My contract states that 3 months' notice needs to be served by either party to terminate the contract. If the notice is less than 3 months, then you have to pay the other party the corresponding amount of salary (1 month less= pay 1 month salary, etc). So, if I just give notice at the end of July and leave immediately, then I will need to pay 3 months' salary to them. In my line of work, credibility is very important, and I might need them to write reference letters in future. So I can't just leave and ignore everything. Also, the issue of joining a competitor and concerns over data access do not apply in my case.

You know, this is EXACTLY why I did not mention the issue of bonus in my original post. I had in my mind been resigned to not receiving my bonus, and was going to make my decision without regard to this issue. But now that it has been brought up and discussed, I feel quite upset about it ... I am even temped to write an (anonymous) email to previous colleagues who left last June to ask about his/her situation regarding the bonus at that time. Would this be a good idea at all? ](*,)

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Re: When should I inform my supervisor of my intention to resign?

Postby PNGMK » Thu, 15 Feb 2018 10:26 pm

Why anonymous? Just ask them.

As for one month pay back clause.... I've seen that one fought successfully before. You'll need a lawyer.
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