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fighting the urge to correct that which is wrong

Posted: Fri, 18 Mar 2016 4:18 pm
by Sporkin
Musing about "doing the right thing" vis-a-vis an overheard conversation where erroneous information is being passed on. What is the socially acceptable etiquette in this case? It is none of my business, I didn't mean to eavesdrop, but its a public place and the subject matter is something i know about, and it's outright wrong, as wrong as describing how similar a mole on the buttocks is to the Eiffel tower.

As much as it is rude to intrude, i do feel in this age where misinformation spreads far quicker than truth that it is everyone's responsibility to arrest this infestation wherever one encounters it.

Say ye yea or nay?

Re: fighting the urge to correct that which is wrong

Posted: Fri, 18 Mar 2016 4:21 pm
by bro75
I wouldn't.

But what was the topic anyway?

Re: fighting the urge to correct that which is wrong

Posted: Fri, 18 Mar 2016 4:26 pm
by Sporkin
Its something about software development methodology. They look like they're having an informal interview to me.
bro75 wrote:I wouldn't.

But what was the topic anyway?

Re: fighting the urge to correct that which is wrong

Posted: Fri, 18 Mar 2016 4:34 pm
by Barnsley
Get your phone out ... Have a pretend phone call about the subject matter , loud enough so they can hear :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

Re: fighting the urge to correct that which is wrong

Posted: Fri, 18 Mar 2016 4:38 pm
by Sporkin
Lol great idea!
Barnsley wrote:Get your phone out ... Have a pretend phone call about the subject matter , loud enough so they can hear :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

Re: fighting the urge to correct that which is wrong

Posted: Fri, 18 Mar 2016 5:10 pm
by x9200
Sporkin wrote:Musing about "doing the right thing" vis-a-vis an overheard conversation where erroneous information is being passed on. What is the socially acceptable etiquette in this case? It is none of my business, I didn't mean to eavesdrop, but its a public place and the subject matter is something i know about, and it's outright wrong, as wrong as describing how similar a mole on the buttocks is to the Eiffel tower.

As much as it is rude to intrude, i do feel in this age where misinformation spreads far quicker than truth that it is everyone's responsibility to arrest this infestation wherever one encounters it.

Say ye yea or nay?
IMHO it's up to you. "I am sorry, but I couldn't help and overheard a part of your conversation....". I think this would be polite enough. And than you may hear a response that this is not your *beeeeeeeeep* business and you will learn to stay away for some time. Or your comment will be appreciated and you will like it. Or many shades of responses in between. It's a complex situation and if you don't like to take risk than don't do it.

Re: fighting the urge to correct that which is wrong

Posted: Fri, 18 Mar 2016 6:33 pm
by PNGMK
Just roll your eyes at the passive listener who is being BS'd and see if he/she rolls his/hers back at you in acknowledgement. Like a masonic handshake.

Re: fighting the urge to correct that which is wrong

Posted: Fri, 18 Mar 2016 7:46 pm
by JR8
Sporkin wrote:Its something about software development methodology. They look like they're having an informal interview to me.
Formal conversations are more than just exchanges of base information, they're almost always reinforcements of relative social position. There is an unspoken but mutually recognised script as to how they usually play-out. That clearly applies in the circumstances of a job interview.

So as a by-stander you have no place within that 'game' [x-ref for example the behavioural psychology book: 'Games people play']. If you were to interrupt to correct the dominant party in the conversation, and publicly correct him that would belittle his relative position and hence certainly not be welcome.

[Apols - this is deep to the 3rd-espresso level man lol]