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PR processing time

Relocating, travelling or planning to make Singapore home? Discuss the criterias, passes or visa that is required.
xpucu
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PR processing time

Postby xpucu » Mon, 04 Jan 2016 3:55 pm

Hi all,

I have read a few of the recent posts suggesting that PR application times are getting longer. When we applied in July last year we got the standard form letter saying we should get a response in 4-6 months (which are up in a couple of weeks).

This is our profile and our application is currently listed as "pending"

race: Caucasian
marital status: married 2.5y
children: none
current status: both on P1 EPs
industry: finance (main applicant) oil&gas (dependent)
education level: both post-graduate degree holders from US universities
income: 100k (main applicant) 300k (dependent)
time in Singapore: 3.5y (main applicant) and 1.5 years (dependent) at time of application
tax evaluations: 2013, 2014 and 2015 (main applicant spent 2012 getting an MBA from INSEAD)

Two questions:
1. What do you think our chances are and how much longer till we hear back?
2. The dependent applicant has just left his job, do we need to report that and how would that impact our application?

Thanks in advance

tomtomtom
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Re: PR processing time

Postby tomtomtom » Mon, 04 Jan 2016 4:23 pm

I applied in July as well, still Pending. Looking forward to see a status update .. either Approved or Rejected.

xpucu
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Re: PR processing time

Postby xpucu » Tue, 05 Jan 2016 9:12 am

What is your profile tomtomtom?

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Strong Eagle
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Re: PR processing time

Postby Strong Eagle » Tue, 05 Jan 2016 10:23 am

xpucu wrote:Two questions:
1. What do you think our chances are and how much longer till we hear back?


Poor chances, and probably within 3 to 6 months. You're in the finance industry and Caucasian... you're not really going to hang around... you'll either get a promotion and leave, or you'll be made redundant and need to leave anyway. And... the gahmen probably figures you're never going to fit in to the neat racial boxes they've set up anyway.

2. The dependent applicant has just left his job, do we need to report that and how would that impact our application?


See? Item 2 lends credence to what I said in Item 1. Maybe if he left, got a new job, and he's now making 400K, no problem... otherwise...

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Re: PR processing time

Postby xpucu » Tue, 05 Jan 2016 10:42 am

Harsh words :)

I am fluent in Mandarin and working for a local company (yes still finance but not an investment bank that will churn people - been there, done that). My husband has quit his job because he was supposed to be relocated and he prefers to start his own company here in Singapore, so we really aren't planning on going anywhere.

Not sure if this makes any difference. I would hope if they were going to ding us, they would do so quickly rather than drawing it out for a year, but who knows. Anyways, appreciate your two cents.

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Re: PR processing time

Postby BBCWatcher » Tue, 05 Jan 2016 11:10 am

I don't think Strong Eagle answered the first part of your second question, so I'll try.

xpucu wrote:2. The dependent applicant has just left his job, do we need to report that and how would that impact our application?

Yes. If there's a job switch then the applicant submits to ICA his new work pass (unless still on a current PEP) and a new Annex A from the new employer. Otherwise the applicant submits his new DP.

What's done is done -- there's no use worrying about it now -- and I'd only be guessing, so I'll refrain from commenting much on the second part of your second question. However, I don't see how it could hurt if the truth is that your husband left his job primarily or exclusively because his employer wanted to transfer him out of Singapore and if he includes a short letter stating that fact along with the other information he's required to provide to ICA.

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Re: PR processing time

Postby xpucu » Tue, 05 Jan 2016 11:22 am

Thanks BBCwatcher. I understand that I need to update the ICA if the main applicant (ie me) changes jobs, but I wasn't clear if that applies to the dependent ones. Since my husband was a dependent applicant we never submitted any Annex A for his job, it was only from my employer. His employment details are only listed in Part B of Form 4A.
If I understand correctly, what you are saying is that I should send them a letter explaining that he has left his job and submit a copy of his DP when that is issued.

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Re: PR processing time

Postby BBCWatcher » Tue, 05 Jan 2016 11:43 am

That's my understanding, yes. His change of status will not be a secret, so it's probably best coming from him anyway.

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Re: PR processing time

Postby Strong Eagle » Tue, 05 Jan 2016 12:22 pm

Never say never... and... just my estimation based upon highly qualified persons, high income, many years in Singapore, being rejected.

I got PR in 2007 after a stint as EP, renewed for 5 years in 2012, no longer on the island, considering packing in PR in order to collect CPF, which continues to be a losing proposition in the world of currency exchange rates.

PR realistically provides exactly two things for you... a) cheap(er) golf at Marina Bay, and b) no worries about being immediately kicked out of the country when you lose your job. There are other benefits but they have been steadily declining since I got my PR.

I judge you should consider your PR application in light of your own long term plans. Unless you are very well off, with sufficient resources to live in high cost Singapore over the long term, PR really doesn't seem that useful. Unlike USA PR, which is really PERMANENT, Singapore PR is really just one more variety of temporary work permit, albeit with better conditions.


xpucu wrote:Harsh words :)

I am fluent in Mandarin and working for a local company (yes still finance but not an investment bank that will churn people - been there, done that). My husband has quit his job because he was supposed to be relocated and he prefers to start his own company here in Singapore, so we really aren't planning on going anywhere.

Not sure if this makes any difference. I would hope if they were going to ding us, they would do so quickly rather than drawing it out for a year, but who knows. Anyways, appreciate your two cents.

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Re: PR processing time

Postby BBCWatcher » Tue, 05 Jan 2016 2:22 pm

Strong Eagle wrote:b) no worries about being immediately kicked out of the country when you lose your job.

The Personalised Employment Pass (PEP) provides a substantially similar benefit to some, for a time. If you forecast a possible job loss in the near future, if you haven't had a PEP already, if you want to stay in Singapore for up to 6 months after loss of employment, and if you qualify, then you could apply for a PEP to solve this particular problem. PR expands on that PEP envelope since PR doesn't have the PEP's income and 6 month restrictions, and PR status is indefinite (not limited to 3 years once per lifetime). Even so, PEP can fit the bill for some -- it's like a "day pass" to the PR club on this score.

Unless you are very well off, with sufficient resources to live in high cost Singapore over the long term, PR really doesn't seem that useful.

Well, it's really only the housing costs that are well above developed country averages/means, with the assumption that you don't do something silly like get a private automobile. If you can manage housing costs well -- e.g. choose a modest home you can live in a good long time, buy it at a less than unreasonable price, and get the mortgage finished off -- the rest usually works out just fine. That's really what HDB is all about for Singaporeans: managing what would otherwise be extraordinary housing costs, the big ticket item in the household budget.

If you want a 40 acre farm (with or without the mule) -- if you have a strong personal preference for lots of residential space -- then that's not Singapore.

Unlike USA PR, which is really PERMANENT, Singapore PR is really just one more variety of temporary work permit, albeit with better conditions.

Conceptually they're quite similar; they only have different enforcement mechanisms. In both countries if you spend too much time "outside" you can lose your status. For the U.S. if you're outside 12 months or longer you put your green card at least at serious risk unless you've provided advance notice of your long absence. Once you hit the 24 month mark your PR status is nearly always lost. (But not necessarily your U.S. tax status. That's a separate matter.) Singapore has re-entry permits (REPs) to manage, but hypothetically you can stay "outside" as long as 4.99 years and still hang onto PR status. You just have to get back in before curfew, and you have to stay in until you're quite sure your mother will let you back into her home the next time you venture out. ;) It's the same basic idea, though. The U.S. places greater emphasis on frequency of physical presence within its borders, while Singapore is more concerned about recent duration.

There is another major benefit to Singapore PR status that applies to many: improved "chain" immigration options. That is, Singapore PRs enjoy some pretty generous privileges to bring family members into Singapore to stay indefinitely. U.S. PRs get almost nothing in that respect.

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Re: RE: Re: PR processing time

Postby ecureilx » Tue, 05 Jan 2016 3:20 pm

BBCWatcher wrote:There is another major benefit to Singapore PR status that applies to many: improved "chain" immigration options. That is, Singapore PRs enjoy some pretty generous privileges to bring family members into Singapore to stay indefinitely. U.S. PRs get almost nothing in that respect.


Really ? Do you have proof of the above ?

Or are you talking of how Singapore was 5++ years ago ?

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Re: PR processing time

Postby BBCWatcher » Wed, 06 Jan 2016 12:44 am

Compared to U.S. PRs? Still much, much better.

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Re: PR processing time

Postby bro75 » Wed, 06 Jan 2016 6:47 am

Bringing parents (or parents-in-law) on a LTVP is a privilege given to PRs but at this time it is difficult to get approved (for certain nationalities).

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Re: PR processing time

Postby BBCWatcher » Wed, 06 Jan 2016 8:36 am

OK, here's an amendment to my remarks upthread. I can think of one family member that a U.S. PR can sponsor for immigration that a Singapore PR cannot: a same sex legal spouse. That started in the latter half of 2013 after the U.S. Supreme Court decided United States v. Windsor.

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Re: PR processing time

Postby ecureilx » Wed, 06 Jan 2016 8:45 am

BBCWatcher wrote:OK, here's an amendment to my remarks upthread. I can think of one family member that a U.S. PR can sponsor for immigration that a Singapore PR cannot: a same sex legal spouse. That started in the latter half of 2013 after the U.S. Supreme Court decided United States v. Windsor.


In additiona -> US, you can sponsor a Fiance for Long term residency (whatever you call that .. ) without even getting married.

Singapore cannot one !

I will still say comparing SG with US - is like saying US has a 1% approval, SG has 1.1% approval, so SG is mucho mucho bettero ! :-k :-k


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