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Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

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pj2629
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Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby pj2629 » Tue, 06 Oct 2015 3:37 am

Hello everyone. I'm new to this forum so apologies if I maybe in a wrong forum section. I'd appreciate it if you can direct me where I needed to be in for this topic.

But I will still share my query.

I have a friend who happens to found out two years ago that his dad is a singaporean citizen. And he is an illegitimate child.

His surname is different and he had found it out at age 21.
Through Facebook they were able to track the father which is in Jurong East Singapore and they met for the very first time. (He went to SG and he is from Philippines)

He wasn't introduced as a son to the family but a friend's son. But you can really see their similarities in facets etc.

Now on his third day the father suddenly told the family with his sister there who visited that day. Everyone was shocked and are speaking loudly in Mandarin and the father's wife cried and etc etc

The guy friend of mine has 4 siblings from that father. When he got back to PH from SG his father stopped communicating with him. And the other siblings were saying that his mom is a whore, etc.

Then 3months after he received a police report that he stole money from the household of his father filed by the wife of his father. Which is not true.

It was sent to him two years ago. It was only a police report. No invitation or whatsoever to go to court.

Now my friend wanted to go to Singapore again for travel. What is waiting for him there knowing there was a report filed on him two years ago???

I was reading some entries in the forum and read about canning etc which made me really scared for him.

We are not aware of how SG law is so we would really appreciate it if you can share what he has to face there.

He was thinking he'd be banned by the immigration and not permitted to go inside the territory of Singapore.
Or he will be arrested etc.

But he is not guilty and is not afraid to say so. Knowing him my whole life I know he is not like that. I think the family of his father doesn't want him to return to Singapore that's why they did it.

My friend doesn't need any money from them too.

We would appreciate responses so we would be enlighten. Thank you

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby ecureilx » Tue, 06 Oct 2015 12:38 pm

pj2629 wrote:Hello everyone. I'm new to this forum so apologies if I maybe in a wrong forum section. I'd appreciate it if you can direct me where I needed to be in for this topic.

But I will still share my query.

I have a friend who happens to found out two years ago that his dad is a singaporean citizen. And he is an illegitimate child.

His surname is different and he had found it out at age 21.
Through Facebook they were able to track the father which is in Jurong East Singapore and they met for the very first time. (He went to SG and he is from Philippines)

He wasn't introduced as a son to the family but a friend's son. But you can really see their similarities in facets etc.

Now on his third day the father suddenly told the family with his sister there who visited that day. Everyone was shocked and are speaking loudly in Mandarin and the father's wife cried and etc etc

The guy friend of mine has 4 siblings from that father. When he got back to PH from SG his father stopped communicating with him. And the other siblings were saying that his mom is a whore, etc.

Then 3months after he received a police report that he stole money from the household of his father filed by the wife of his father. Which is not true.

It was sent to him two years ago. It was only a police report. No invitation or whatsoever to go to court.

Now my friend wanted to go to Singapore again for travel. What is waiting for him there knowing there was a report filed on him two years ago???

I was reading some entries in the forum and read about canning etc which made me really scared for him.

We are not aware of how SG law is so we would really appreciate it if you can share what he has to face there.

He was thinking he'd be banned by the immigration and not permitted to go inside the territory of Singapore.
Or he will be arrested etc.

But he is not guilty and is not afraid to say so. Knowing him my whole life I know he is not like that. I think the family of his father doesn't want him to return to Singapore that's why they did it.

My friend doesn't need any money from them too.

We would appreciate responses so we would be enlighten. Thank you


Let me summarise this:

a) Your 'friend' who is 21 years old, found out two years ago that he has a Singaporean father, and tracked down his father and turned up at his house.
b) And your friend has 4 'step' siblings.
c) And then his father's legal family filed a police complaint and Police didn't invite him over for discussion
d) And now your friend wants to travel to Singapore but is worried:

Now I have a few Questions:
1) Did your friend do a DNA test to confirm the father or is facial features good enough ?
2) Where is your friend's mother in all of this ? What is / was her work anyway ?
3) And how did he end up with a robbery complaint ? did he stay in the father's house ?

To give you a bit of info about Police here.
Unlike Philippines, if the person is out of the country, the police here are not so forgiving. And the police will not ask the person over for any clarification. So if there is a complaint of robbery, not much you can do, other than write back to The Police. And no, The police won't pay for travel expenses if they do need him over here.

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby JR8 » Tue, 06 Oct 2015 2:37 pm

pj2629 wrote:Then 3months after he received a police report that he stole money from the household of his father filed by the wife of his father. Which is not true.
It was sent to him two years ago. It was only a police report. No invitation or whatsoever to go to court.


A curious story.
- I'd want to know who sent him the report (i.e. is it genuine?)
- Do the SG police send 'reports of alleged crimes' to the accused* - whether the accused are in SG, or elsewhere abroad?
- If so for what purpose; to give the accused a right to respond, did the latter say anything like that?... don't know, it makes little sense to me.
- How did the police know where he lived?
- What did the report say; 'You have been accused of XYZ...' ??

My initial overall impression would be to check the report is real. Rather than something faked up by the step-mother, who might have an interest in seeing your friend (who turned up in SG for the first time and brought significant problems for the family) never enter SG again. ... :-k

* And until such time as it might be determined (judged) in court, it is only an accusation.

[I'm not a lawyer, but am trying to consider this with a 'fresh-eyes'/common-sense approach].
'Do it or do not do it: You will regret both' - Kierkegaard

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby ecureilx » Tue, 06 Oct 2015 2:48 pm

JR8 wrote:My initial overall impression would be to check the report is real. Rather than something faked up by the step-mother, who might have an interest in seeing your friend (who turned up in SG for the first time and brought significant problems for the family) never enter SG again. ... :-k


Step mother ? Does that term apply here for the legal wife of the father ?

Well, I too doubt the cops just sent a letter, unless there is more that what meets the eyes.

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby JR8 » Tue, 06 Oct 2015 3:52 pm

ecureilx wrote:Step mother ? Does that term apply here for the legal wife of the father ?


I briefly pondered that too, but (rightly or wrongly) concluded that she can't be anything else - at least not to my 'IANAL' knowledge. Can you suggest an alternative? :-k

i.e. Assuming the man IS his father, and say he was married to and later divorced his son's mother, and remarried, the 2nd wife would be his step-mother.
But what if the father had an affair outside of marriage, yielding this young man, what does this make any legal relationship to the then and now wife of his father? ... :-k

----------------
'stepmother
1. a woman who has married one's father after the death or divorce of one's mother
Collins English Dictionary

stepmother
the wife of one's father by a later marr
iage.
Webster's College Dictionary
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/stepmother
---------------

The above suggests that you're right.

----------------
': a woman that your father marries after his marriage to or relationship with your mother has ended'

And this does too... but it goes on to a 2nd definition which seems somewhat contradictory...

'Full Definition of STEPMOTHER
: the wife of one's father when distinct from one's natural or legal mother

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stepmother
------------------

Can a person be a 'wife of my father', without being the mother or step-mother? ... :-k

Anyway, irrespective of this point, I think much probably hinges on the nature of that letter.

p.s. Is my memory correct that you can't see a copy of your police record unless you physically present yourself to the authorities in SG? If that's correct it presents the subject with a bit of catch-22, how does he know if he can enter, without physically attempting to and risking refusal of entry? Rather than making such a trip on an SVP is there a relevant visa category he could apply for, where the application process would reveal if he does indeed have a police record in SG? Or, is there some other way out of the (apparent) catch-22?
'Do it or do not do it: You will regret both' - Kierkegaard

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby pj2629 » Tue, 06 Oct 2015 4:50 pm

I'm sorry for rushing with the whole story and not making the whole story clear.

The mom of my friend worked before in Malaysia. The father at that time is also in Malaysia he used to be a manager.
But the father is Singaporean.
The father presented himself as a not married man and courted the Filipina.
So she got pregnant and 4months down the road of pregnancy she learned the guy is not single and is married.
Having to not want to destroy the family, she went back to Philippines and evaded the father. She met another man which gave my friend his surname although he is not from him.

21years later my friend learned about this secret and he was invited by the Singaporean father to come over to his house for 4days 3nights. He stayed in his father's house with the wife and the siblings.

The mother of my friend is still in the Philippines. She doesn't have work and is very sick for the past 12years now. My friend is a professional now and had finished his degree.

There was no DNA filed but when my friend was asked what his blood type is, he said he is Type AB which the whole bloodline happened to be. There was a day there of crying and shouting and everyone was shocked when the father suddenly blurted that my friend is his son. They have the same eyes, the family's big arms, and the blood type ad it was enough for them to acknowledge that he is really the father's son.

I believe the family had made the father give the address of my friend in the Philippines. The police report was filed one day after he returned to Philippines and only came after 3months because of the slowness of shipping parcels.

As far as he can remember, it was two parcels which contained a photocopy of the police report. He threw it that day because of so much hurt that he was accused. But he said the letter said that the complainant is the wife, (whole name) and that the alleged stayed in their house for 4days. And that when the wife came home and checked the drawer of one of her daughter (my friend stayed in that room) there was the following missing items:

A bunny purse containing coins worth around 30++ SGD
An envelope containing around 300sgd
Some necklace of some sort
And the list was a bit long but none of those he really remember seeing nor anything.

There wasn't really an invitation to come or to respond as far as he can remember.
It was a copy that the wife filed a complaint to him. And maybe the wife photocopied the report and sent it over to PH so it wasn't really from the police. (The handwriting of the envelope is from the wife as far as he can tell)

He also received lots of messages before from the wife and the children that he father would never contact him anymore, that his mother is a dirty woman, etc.

We just wanted to ask so he knows what to expect if ever he presented himself at the border of Singapore again. I am afraid he won't be given any equal justice because he is a foreigner technically or he will be charged thousands of Singaporean dollars.

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby JR8 » Tue, 06 Oct 2015 6:10 pm

Don't worry, it is normal for a complicated story to develop as it gets discussed, since I don't think many people could pre-emptively provide every possible relevant detail in their first post.

The question for me right now would be to what extent a police report (which is just an allegation) can/might prejudice a person's ability to enter Singapore?

For example, if I lived in Singapore (and was unmarried), and had my BF/GF visit from abroad, and we had a huge fight, could I simply file a false police report on them that would forever prejudice their ability to enter SG? I'm not convinced that that would make sense; but Ecu perhaps knows more clearly.

---
I once had a very dramatic bust-up with someone, who then was set of getting revenge against me. Note though this was in the US, not SG. A few weeks later they gleefully told me that they had filed a police report against me alleging XYZ. I braced myself and visited the police and requested a copy of the report. Reading it was one of the more surreal moments of my life. Surreal, completely fabricated, extremely malicious, and in great detail which made it quite frightening to realise the er... magnitude of what I was up against.

As I recall I had a right to file my observations on that report, which after I'd mentally picked myself up off the floor a few days later I did in a calm-headed and clinical way. But I was still in the US at that time, and so could do so in person at the police station and 'under oath'.

At that time a person from the EU could visit the US under the Visa Waiver Programme (similar to SGs SVP). One thing using the VWP instead of a full visa required was that you had essentially no criminal record. The question on the VWP entry card was roughly 'Have you ever been convicted in a court of law of a Misdemeanour or higher offence?'. If you had you were not eligible for the VWP; you had to go to the embassy for a full visa.

I simply mention this anecdote because it's my understanding that that simple allegation, the police report from a few years earlier, would not have prejudiced my right to use the SVP, since I'd never been found guilty by a court. I.e. I had an allegation recorded against me, but it had never been judged by a court and found to be true. I see parallels there at that time between my position vs the US, and your friends now vs SG.

Perhaps about 8 years later I started dating my now wife, who by chance lived in NYC. Hence I visited frequently, and being able to work remotely I spent a great amount of time there doing the US equivalent of 'maxing out my use of a SGn SVP'. Until it came to a point that Immigration (USCBP) at NYC started asking me questions whenever I showed up at JFK/EWR as to what I was doing there, was I working there etc. Ultimately one time I was taken off for 'Secondly Inspection', i.e. questioning in a back-room. That was an *extremely* hostile past-midnight encounter with a USCBP officer, who asked me 101 questions then tried to smash holes in my story. My point in recounting that is that he apparently had my entire 'record' relating to every time I'd visited the States, the period of time previously I had lived and worked there (all completely legally), and so on. But, despite the 101 questions at no point was the police report (the false allegations) ever mentioned. And really, if that USCBP officer could have additionally thrown that at me, 1000% sure he would have!

So, over to Ecu, or others who know. To what extent, if any, does a police report figure on an individuals record that is later used to determine eligibility for immigration purposes...?
'Do it or do not do it: You will regret both' - Kierkegaard

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby pj2629 » Tue, 06 Oct 2015 6:24 pm

JR8 wrote:Don't worry, it is normal for a complicated story to develop as it gets discussed, since I don't think many people could pre-emptively provide every possible relevant detail in their first post.

The question for me right now would be to what extent a police report (which is just an allegation) can/might prejudice a person's ability to enter Singapore?

For example, if I lived in Singapore (and was unmarried), and had my BF/GF visit from abroad, and we had a huge fight, could I simply file a false police report on them that would forever prejudice their ability to enter SG? I'm not convinced that that would make sense; but Ecu perhaps knows more clearly.

---
I once had a very dramatic bust-up with someone, who then was set of getting revenge against me. Note though this was in the US, not SG. A few weeks later they gleefully told me that they had filed a police report against me alleging XYZ. I braced myself and visited the police and requested a copy of the report. Reading it was one of the more surreal moments of my life. Surreal, completely fabricated, extremely malicious, and in great detail which made it quite frightening to realise the er... magnitude of what I was up against.

As I recall I had a right to file my observations on that report, which after I'd mentally picked myself up off the floor a few days later I did in a calm-headed and clinical way. But I was still in the US at that time, and so could do so in person at the police station and 'under oath'.

At that time a person from the EU could visit the US under the Visa Waiver Programme (similar to SGs SVP). One thing using the VWP instead of a full visa required was that you had essentially no criminal record. The question on the VWP entry card was roughly 'Have you ever been convicted in a court of law of a Misdemeanour or higher offence?'. If you had you were not eligible for the VWP; you had to go to the embassy for a full visa.

I simply mention this anecdote because it's my understanding that that simple allegation, the police report from a few years earlier, would not have prejudiced my right to use the SVP, since I'd never been found guilty by a court. I.e. I had an allegation recorded against me, but it had never been judged by a court and found to be true. I see parallels there at that time between my position vs the US, and your friends now vs SG.

Perhaps about 8 years later I started dating my now wife, who by chance lived in NYC. Hence I visited frequently, and being able to work remotely I spent a great amount of time there doing the US equivalent of 'maxing out my use of a SGn SVP'. Until it came to a point that Immigration (USCBP) at NYC started asking me questions whenever I showed up at JFK/EWR as to what I was doing there, was I working there etc. Ultimately one time I was taken off for 'Secondly Inspection', i.e. questioning in a back-room. That was an *extremely* hostile past-midnight encounter with a USCBP officer, who asked me 101 questions then tried to smash holes in my story. My point in recounting that is that he apparently had my entire 'record' relating to every time I'd visited the States, the period of time previously I had lived and worked there (all completely legally), and so on. But, despite the 101 questions at no point was the police report (the false allegations) ever mentioned. And really, if that USCBP officer could have additionally thrown that at me, 1000% sure he would have!

So, over to Ecu, or others who know. To what extent, if any, does a police report figure on an individuals record that is later used to determine eligibility for immigration purposes...?


Thank you for your story ! It was a very good one. I'm glad they didn't rip you off or anything.

And yes my question boils down to yours as well:

To what extent, if any, does a police report figure on an individuals record that is later used to determine eligibility for immigration purposes...?

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby ecureilx » Tue, 06 Oct 2015 6:45 pm

pj2629 wrote:The mom of my friend worked before in Malaysia. The father at that time is also in Malaysia he used to be a manager.


Your friend never told what his mother was working as, in Malaysia, not that it matters much now anyway..

pj2629 wrote:Having to not want to destroy the family, she went back to Philippines and evaded the father. She met another man which gave my friend his surname although he is not from him.


And now 21 years later, the mother sent the son for closure ? I truly believe that she wanted to not to destroy his family.

Registering with a different surname ? That is a normal thing that happens in Philippines, including registering the child with the mother's surname. Now why didn't the child be registered with the mother's surname ?

pj2629 wrote:21years later my friend learned about this secret and he was invited by the Singaporean father to come over to his house for 4days 3nights. He stayed in his father's house with the wife and the siblings.


Siblings ? well, doesn't make it legitimate, as the legal children are not his siblings, just being frank there. While your 'friend' may want to see the other children as siblings, it's not gonna happen, I am sure of it.

pj2629 wrote:There was no DNA filed but when my friend was asked what his blood type is, he said he is Type AB which the whole bloodline happened to be. There was a day there of crying and shouting and everyone was shocked when the father suddenly blurted that my friend is his son. They have the same eyes, the family's big arms, and the blood type ad it was enough for them to acknowledge that he is really the father's son.


Yep, blood type is good enough. No, not so.

If there was even an iota of sincerity, your friend,being a 'professional', should have gotten a DNA Sample, and gotten a match. Similiar face features are not good enough, in Reality. Big arms ? how about tall like his father, colour of hair like his father ? How different are Asian Eyes ? Are they blue, green, purple ??

pj2629 wrote:I believe the family had made the father give the address of my friend in the Philippines. The police report was filed one day after he returned to Philippines and only came after 3months because of the slowness of shipping parcels.


Parcels only take 6 weeks, not 3 months, and seems your friend's father is being pushed to a corner. What will it do for your friend to turn up again, specially since your friend says he wants peace with the father ?

pj2629 wrote:We just wanted to ask so he knows what to expect if ever he presented himself at the border of Singapore again. I am afraid he won't be given any equal justice because he is a foreigner technically or he will be charged thousands of Singaporean dollars.


What justice ? Like allowed to enter Singapore ? Being allowed to enter Singapore is a Privilege, not a right. so being refused is not injustice. In fact, on a daily basis a few dozen, including filipinos/filipinas, get refused entry by ICA. No injustice there.

And equal justice ? mmmm, are you implying that, if ICA refuses entry to your friend, it will be injustice due to partial justice ? Nice ..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalyeserye

JR8 wrote:So, over to Ecu, or others who know. To what extent, if any, does a police report figure on an individuals record that is later used to determine eligibility for immigration purposes...?


From what I know, and seen, it is easy to blacklist a person, especially if the person is from Asean/Asian countries

The only chance for a successful appeal and entry is for the person to show due cause, or got a good job here, or can prove relations here, and had justification to squash whatever report that was made, if there was one such report.

I see no reason why the ICA folks see any reason for the person to be allowed, if a Police Record was made, and ICA notified.

Then again, unless there was a court hearing etc etc, unlikely for ICA to have been notified. Looks like a scare to keep the 'friend' away from Singapore ..

And, JR8, years ago, I was nearly in a similar soup. Long story short, but, let me put it this way, it did nearly drive me nuts till I figured out it was a form of vengeance by an Ex- including insisting the baby has the same colour eyes, skin tone (yes ... ) and on and on, and turned out she wasn't even anywhere she claimed to be- and faking it all up... so my response maybe slightly prejudiced.

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby pj2629 » Tue, 06 Oct 2015 11:41 pm

ecureilx wrote:
pj2629 wrote:The mom of my friend worked before in Malaysia. The father at that time is also in Malaysia he used to be a manager.


Your friend never told what his mother was working as, in Malaysia, not that it matters much now anyway..

The mom used to work in a restaurant as a server.

pj2629 wrote:Having to not want to destroy the family, she went back to Philippines and evaded the father. She met another man which gave my friend his surname although he is not from him.


And now 21 years later, the mother sent the son for closure ? I truly believe that she wanted to not to destroy his family.

Some relative of his slipped the truth and not the mother. She did not sent the son for closure.

Registering with a different surname ? That is a normal thing that happens in Philippines, including registering the child with the mother's surname. Now why didn't the child be registered with the mother's surname ?

Because the husband of my friend's mother wanted the child to bear his surname and the mother doesn't want the son to grow being an illegitimate child

pj2629 wrote:21years later my friend learned about this secret and he was invited by the Singaporean father to come over to his house for 4days 3nights. He stayed in his father's house with the wife and the siblings.


Siblings ? well, doesn't make it legitimate, as the legal children are not his siblings, just being frank there. While your 'friend' may want to see the other children as siblings, it's not gonna happen, I am sure of it.

i said the wife and the siblings meaning the kids of my friend's father. I did not say that my friend and those other four children are siblings

pj2629 wrote:There was no DNA filed but when my friend was asked what his blood type is, he said he is Type AB which the whole bloodline happened to be. There was a day there of crying and shouting and everyone was shocked when the father suddenly blurted that my friend is his son. They have the same eyes, the family's big arms, and the blood type ad it was enough for them to acknowledge that he is really the father's son.


Yep, blood type is good enough. No, not so.

If there was even an iota of sincerity, your friend,being a 'professional', should have gotten a DNA Sample, and gotten a match. Similiar face features are not good enough, in Reality. Big arms ? how about tall like his father, colour of hair like his father ? How different are Asian Eyes ? Are they blue, green, purple ??

the father did not ask for it but yea had he known this will come to this he should've.

pj2629 wrote:I believe the family had made the father give the address of my friend in the Philippines. The police report was filed one day after he returned to Philippines and only came after 3months because of the slowness of shipping parcels.


Parcels only take 6 weeks, not 3 months, and seems your friend's father is being pushed to a corner. What will it do for your friend to turn up again, specially since your friend says he wants peace with the father ?

my friend just wanted to come visit SG to travel .not to make peace or anything with the family.

pj2629 wrote:We just wanted to ask so he knows what to expect if ever he presented himself at the border of Singapore again. I am afraid he won't be given any equal justice because he is a foreigner technically or he will be charged thousands of Singaporean dollars.


What justice ? Like allowed to enter Singapore ? Being allowed to enter Singapore is a Privilege, not a right. so being refused is not injustice. In fact, on a daily basis a few dozen, including filipinos/filipinas, get refused entry by ICA. No injustice there.

And equal justice ? mmmm, are you implying that, if ICA refuses entry to your friend, it will be injustice due to partial justice ? Nice ..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalyeserye

I may have used the wrong word but I meant is that maybe the SG government would suddenly condemn him and all. I am asking because we don't really know.

JR8 wrote:So, over to Ecu, or others who know. To what extent, if any, does a police report figure on an individuals record that is later used to determine eligibility for immigration purposes...?


From what I know, and seen, it is easy to blacklist a person, especially if the person is from Asean/Asian countries

The only chance for a successful appeal and entry is for the person to show due cause, or got a good job here, or can prove relations here, and had justification to squash whatever report that was made, if there was one such report.

I see no reason why the ICA folks see any reason for the person to be allowed, if a Police Record was made, and ICA notified. ----> This part is a bit confusing. Please explain.

Then again, unless there was a court hearing etc etc, unlikely for ICA to have been notified. Looks like a scare to keep the 'friend' away from Singapore ..

And, JR8, years ago, I was nearly in a similar soup. Long story short, but, let me put it this way, it did nearly drive me nuts till I figured out it was a form of vengeance by an Ex- including insisting the baby has the same colour eyes, skin tone (yes ... ) and on and on, and turned out she wasn't even anywhere she claimed to be- and faking it all up... so my response maybe slightly prejudiced.

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Re: RE: Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby ecureilx » Wed, 07 Oct 2015 12:09 am

pj2629 wrote:my friend just wanted to come visit SG to travel .not to make peace or anything with the family.


Sorry if this sounds terrible...

But why Singapore, of all places ?

To visit Sentosa and the Singapore flyer ?

Unless he has some other plans

And lastly, I do find it incredible that in Singapore somebody let your friend stay for few days without wondering who it was. It's an extreme rarity in Singaporeans.

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby JR8 » Wed, 07 Oct 2015 1:03 am

JR8 wrote:So, over to Ecu, or others who know. To what extent, if any, does a police report figure on an individuals record that is later used to determine eligibility for immigration purposes...?

ecureilx wrote: From what I know, and seen, it is easy to blacklist a person, especially if the person is from Asean/Asian countries


You mean to say that you can get a person blacklisted from SG simply on the basis of an unproven allegation? I don't get it... wouldn't that be an invitation for all kinds of malicious/falsified reporting by those out for revenge, and also see a lot of innocent people unjustly and unnecessarily being barred from Singapore based upon false but alleged petty crimes?

ecureilx wrote:The only chance for a successful appeal and entry is for the person to show due cause, or got a good job here, or can prove relations here, and had justification to squash whatever report that was made, if there was one such report.


Perhaps you could clarify what 'due cause' is, as it's lost on me and sounds like it could be important.
And how would you 'squash [the] report made'? It is often inherently difficult to disprove what is simply untrue; surely why Judgements tend to be arrived at based upon only proven facts.
But you make a good point, 'If there was such a report'; how can the subject concerned confirm whether the alleged report is in fact genuine? This fact is still unproven.

ecureilx wrote:I see no reason why the ICA folks see any reason for the person to be allowed, if a Police Record was made, and ICA notified.
Then again, unless there was a court hearing etc etc, unlikely for ICA to have been notified. Looks like a scare to keep the 'friend' away from Singapore ..


Maybe the perspective differs according to where you're from? I tend to assume I have a right to enter a country (naturally, this is as per their laws and discretion) unless there are reasons to disallow me. And if there are such reasons I'd expect some element of a right to know what those reasons are. Because if I had no such right, then I'd never be able to overturn a false allegation that say led to a potential refusal of entry.
So yes, that's an impression I have too, based upon the stated facts to date, that this is an attempted scare.... -> hence, how to disprove it, or confirm it has no actual power?

ecureilx wrote:And, JR8, years ago, I was nearly in a similar soup. Long story short, but, let me put it this way, it did nearly drive me nuts till I figured out it was a form of vengeance by an Ex- including insisting the baby has the same colour eyes, skin tone (yes ... ) and on and on, and turned out she wasn't even anywhere she claimed to be- and faking it all up... so my response maybe slightly prejudiced.


Yep, I know what you mean (and feel your pain!). Was their no 'just' route for you out of the situation, and hence the false allegations have stuck until today?
'Do it or do not do it: You will regret both' - Kierkegaard

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby the lynx » Wed, 07 Oct 2015 9:06 am

IIRC, if there is an arrest warrant (which is issued by the court), then ICA would have their antennae up for OP. Otherwise, it wouldn't be part of the ICA's database like Interpol wanted-list.

From my experience, I have seen/heard of many police reports made for bizarre reasons, and with equally-bizarre stories. From stupid stuff like I-didn't-know-she-has-penis cheating case to paranormal they-stole-my-chi or bomoh-and-toyol cases. The police force has better things to do and they have concerns of higher level other than filing away the report. For this case (where the accused is a non-citizen residing outside Singapore), there is nothing the accuser can do and I'd reckon the accuser would need to push to the court for police to act beyond receiving/filing the report.

Scare tactic definitely.

Police report is not the same as conviction. That's why the immigration officers always ask if you have been CONVICTED in Singapore or other country for any crime including immigration offences.

If OP needs to fly to Singapore for purely tourism or business (and definitely not to seek out the father), he can do so without fear.

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby ecureilx » Wed, 07 Oct 2015 1:19 pm

Following, again, is my 2 cents (or 4 cents or 6 cents now)

JR8 wrote:You mean to say that you can get a person blacklisted from SG simply on the basis of an unproven allegation? I don't get it... wouldn't that be an invitation for all kinds of malicious/falsified reporting by those out for revenge, and also see a lot of innocent people unjustly and unnecessarily being barred from Singapore based upon false but alleged petty crimes?


Ok, you didn't hear this from me, but it is not hard to make a foreigner's entry to Singapore. If you know how, there is a high chance of success. Like blacklisting maids, and former work pass holders. Then again, I am sure ICA errs on the side of caution, and this being Singapore, most of the times, the person will be presumed to be guilty, before being cleared.

Then again, if and when the person gets stopped, try to recall when ICA gave any reason for the refusal of entry ?

JR8 wrote:Perhaps you could clarify what 'due cause' is, as it's lost on me and sounds like it could be important.
And how would you 'squash [the] report made'? It is often inherently difficult to disprove what is simply untrue; surely why Judgements tend to be arrived at based upon only proven facts.
But you make a good point, 'If there was such a report'; how can the subject concerned confirm whether the alleged report is in fact genuine? This fact is still unproven.


Catch 22: you don't know if somebody went the whole 9 yards to block your entering Singapore, until you try to enter

I am not sure if seeking clearence from Police will work in this case, and alas, I haven't even gotten close to seeing something like that.

And only if the person has been denied entry can he / she write to ICA to seek an exemption. That's what i know

JR8 wrote:Maybe the perspective differs according to where you're from? I tend to assume I have a right to enter a country (naturally, this is as per their laws and discretion) unless there are reasons to disallow me. And if there are such reasons I'd expect some element of a right to know what those reasons are. Because if I had no such right, then I'd never be able to overturn a false allegation that say led to a potential refusal of entry.


Well, the difference between carrying an Asian passport or a Western Passport

Many Asians get their visa applications rejected, and that includes Malaysians heading to US, who have produced all the documents, and more than enough proof of finance.

And even after that, upon arrival, they are 'randomly picked up' for secondary screening, (to quote a famous comedian) on each of their entry to US/UK, and again, randomly, quite a few are refused entry

Right ? What right ? I, again, have no recollection of anybody being told why they were refused a visa or entry

JR8 wrote:Yep, I know what you mean (and feel your pain!). Was their no 'just' route for you out of the situation, and hence the false allegations have stuck until today?


Nah, got over it, when her good friend ratted on her and told me the baby is somebody else' baby and she was just taking the opportunity to drive me mental, and she nearly succeeded.

I also got to see the baby's actual parents photos etc, in case I was told the baby was given up for adoption. People can be cruel beyond imagination, at times.

the lynx wrote:From my experience, I have seen/heard of many police reports made for bizarre reasons, and with equally-bizarre stories. From stupid stuff like I-didn't-know-she-has-penis cheating case to paranormal they-stole-my-chi or bomoh-and-toyol cases.


I didn't read that at all :D

the lynx wrote:If OP needs to fly to Singapore for purely tourism or business (and definitely not to seek out the father), he can do so without fear.


In a way, yes, you can file police reports for any unsubstantiated accusations, but unless there was a case/judgement, then unlikely it went further, or, as I said, the person went to great extremes to ensure one of the above was done.

Yep, I still agree it is more likely a case of scare tactics

But then again, I have this burning question to OP, again, if he doesn't plan to go near his father's other family (or legal family), what's the urgency to visit Singapore ?

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Re: Illegitimate child of a Singaporean Citizen needs help

Postby nakatago » Wed, 07 Oct 2015 1:22 pm

ecureilx wrote:But then again, I have this burning question to OP, again, if he doesn't plan to go near his father's other family (or legal family), what's the urgency to visit Singapore ?


Uh, job prospects? Tourism? Doy...

A Filipino can only go to so many countries without needing to apply for a visa.


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