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Mangled metaphors, scroowy sayings

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the lynx
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Postby the lynx » Thu, 09 Oct 2014 8:45 am

Brah wrote:So, while many of the posts here do in fact have examples of messed up English, that is nothing new for this forum.

I still haven't seen any of the many mixed sayings and clichés re the OP, except my poor example of one.

Stuff like "Don't put all your eggs in your pocket", or something like that, where they get half of it right..

Crikey there are tons of these out there!


Honestly I don't think there are genuine examples of English proverbs, idioms, sayings and cliches being mangled in Singapore, because they DON'T USE them here!

The only bunch of people I know how uses them here is the expats because even those born around here and educated in English missionary schools or abroad, seem to drop the use in regular conversations.

Now that I mentioned this, I know one place where Singaporeans do: TV commercials...

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Postby Barnsley » Thu, 09 Oct 2014 9:58 am

I read "walk the talk" here a lot ....

I had never heard that before until I came here

Walk the walk or Talk the Talk yes , but never a mix.

Is walk the talk or talk the walk particular to Singapore?
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Re: Mangled metaphors, scroowy sayings

Postby x9200 » Thu, 09 Oct 2014 10:36 am

Brah wrote:The sticky I asked for a few weeks back.

I'll start it off:

"...some inconsiderate driver some day will meet his marker..."
http://forums.hardwarezone.com.sg/eat-drink-man-woman-16/%5Bgvgt%5D-james-george-palins-road-rage-video-against-sinkie-couple-along-tanjong-katong-road-4829839-17.html

Typo? Possibly, but I doubt it.

Googling for this specific phrase to see the frequency I found this:
Went to meet his marker. Rest in peas.

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Re: Mangled metaphors, scroowy sayings

Postby nakatago » Thu, 09 Oct 2014 10:37 am

x9200 wrote:
Brah wrote:The sticky I asked for a few weeks back.

I'll start it off:

"...some inconsiderate driver some day will meet his marker..."
http://forums.hardwarezone.com.sg/eat-drink-man-woman-16/%5Bgvgt%5D-james-george-palins-road-rage-video-against-sinkie-couple-along-tanjong-katong-road-4829839-17.html

Typo? Possibly, but I doubt it.

Googling for this specific phrase to see the frequency I found this:
Went to meet his marker. Rest in peas.


http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1267 ... s-on-earth

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Postby JR8 » Thu, 09 Oct 2014 11:04 am

nakatago wrote:
ecureilx wrote:orientate?
heard that?

Aussies use it too, apparently. :shock:
I just keep using "to orient" and its conjugations to save a syllable.


I don't have a problem with 'orientate'. For example - 'He spent the morning walking around the factory floor, to orientate himself, and meet the various managers'.

What jars on me rather is 'orient' - 'I suggested he spent the morning walking around the factory floor, so he could orient himself, and meet the various managers'.

I don't think I heard the latter use until I lived in the US.

[I'm not saying it's 'right or wrong', and language does not have rules that are as black and white as that].

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Postby nakatago » Thu, 09 Oct 2014 11:42 am

JR8 wrote:[I'm not saying it's 'right or wrong', and language does not have rules that are as black and white as that].


Still not as bad as revert and shift.

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Postby QRM » Thu, 09 Oct 2014 12:30 pm

"I need your advise"
"I borrow you my book" ( lend )
"Choking the toilet" Even the SIA planes has a sign telling you not to "Choke" the bog.

and below its more of a accent issue:

"Ho-oh-co milo?"

Took me ages to work out the cashier at Jasons was asking if I had a "passion card"

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Postby ecureilx » Thu, 09 Oct 2014 1:45 pm

QRM wrote:"I need your advise"
"I borrow you my book" ( lend )
"Choking the toilet" Even the SIA planes has a sign telling you not to "Choke" the bog.

and below its more of a accent issue:

"Ho-oh-co milo?"

Took me ages to work out the cashier at Jasons was asking if I had a "passion card"


passion ?

if the cashier was a foreigner, they tend to say Pash-y-oon. not local accent

for ortientate ... I referred in the context of Orientate new employees ... :p

wonder if that does fit in there really ...

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Postby JR8 » Thu, 09 Oct 2014 1:48 pm

ecureilx wrote:for ortientate ... I referred in the context of Orientate new employees ... :p
wonder if that does fit in there really ...


Well if they can be given an 'orientation', then that would seem to serve to 'orientate' them.

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Postby Wd40 » Fri, 10 Oct 2014 10:43 am

This repeating of words is very common:
Just heard this in the last 2 days:

I think think think...
I change change change until cannot change anymore oredi
Last edited by Wd40 on Fri, 10 Oct 2014 12:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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the lynx
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Postby the lynx » Fri, 10 Oct 2014 11:28 am

Brah wrote:So, while many of the posts here do in fact have examples of messed up English, that is nothing new for this forum.

I still haven't seen any of the many mixed sayings and clichés re the OP, except my poor example of one.

Stuff like "Don't put all your eggs in your pocket", or something like that, where they get half of it right..

Crikey there are tons of these out there!


I found it! Overheard this in a train yesterday.

A: We broke up already. She said we moved too fast, especially on the *ahem* part. (Can't believe it. I like her so much for x years and when I finally got her, it only lasted y weeks.)*

B: I told you already ma. You cannot anyhow have a cake and eat it straight away.




*These were said in other parts of the same conversation. Not necessarily right before the "have a cake and eat it too" bit.

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Postby JR8 » Fri, 10 Oct 2014 2:36 pm

Q. Can or not?
A. Can can can!


---


'Jiak kantang' [Malay] => potato-mouth => putting on a bit of a western accent to try and sound cool.

Potato-mouth?! :lol: :lol:

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the lynx
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Postby the lynx » Fri, 10 Oct 2014 2:45 pm

JR8 wrote:Q. Can or not?
A. Can can can!


---


'Jiak kantang' [Malay] => potato-mouth => putting on a bit of a western accent to try and sound cool.

Potato-mouth?! :lol: :lol:


Jiak = Hokkien for "to eat"

Kantang = Straits Chinese Hokkien for "potato" after Malay word "kentang" (the actual Hokkien term is "huan chu")

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Postby Aragorn2000 » Fri, 10 Oct 2014 6:28 pm

Weightage :lol:

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Postby Brah » Sat, 11 Oct 2014 12:46 pm

the lynx wrote:
Brah wrote:So, while many of the posts here do in fact have examples of messed up English, that is nothing new for this forum.

I still haven't seen any of the many mixed sayings and clichés re the OP, except my poor example of one.

Stuff like "Don't put all your eggs in your pocket", or something like that, where they get half of it right..

Crikey there are tons of these out there!


I found it! Overheard this in a train yesterday.

A: We broke up already. She said we moved too fast, especially on the *ahem* part. (Can't believe it. I like her so much for x years and when I finally got her, it only lasted y weeks.)*

B: I told you already ma. You cannot anyhow have a cake and eat it straight away.


Finally! That's what I was talking about.


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