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Should we bring our own bicycles?

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x9200
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Postby x9200 » Wed, 20 Aug 2014 8:47 pm

CaptainBullus wrote:Having been 'in country' for a month now one of my little annoyances is that everyone cycles on the pavement! Almost everyday I hear the ringing of a bike bell and everyone scatters (well, saunters mostly) as some cyclist shoots by. Has anyone told these people they're not allowed on the pavement?


Yes, I did to one guy and now when he sees me he makes an enormous arc to pass me by and does not use ring for me any longer. I tried some more but they accelerated.

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Postby ecureilx » Wed, 20 Aug 2014 10:41 pm

Barnsley wrote:[.

Rant over ... sorry


talking about electric bicycles last week in East Coast Park, I saw an electric bicycle flying pretty fast being closely followed by ..

a

guy in office dress

and

tie

in

a

..... electric scooter (those folding things)

scary to even cycle in East coast park now .....

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Postby aster » Wed, 20 Aug 2014 10:45 pm

CaptainBullus wrote:Having been 'in country' for a month now one of my little annoyances is that everyone cycles on the pavement! Almost everyday I hear the ringing of a bike bell and everyone scatters (well, saunters mostly) as some cyclist shoots by. Has anyone told these people they're not allowed on the pavement?


If you've only been around for a month you might still be under the impression that there are high driving standards here.

Once you see how badly people drive and how openly they break the law (jumping red lights is perfectly normal here unless there is a traffic light camera present) you won't be surprised that cyclists prefer to escape to the pavements to prevent endangering their life span.

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Postby JR8 » Wed, 20 Aug 2014 10:56 pm

^+1

Hence why I hate the arrogance of local cyclists so much.

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Postby taxico » Wed, 20 Aug 2014 11:50 pm

curiousgeorge wrote:...Seriously, every* condo I have ever been in here has a collection of locked bikes covered in rust with flat tyres that have probably been there since the original owners moved out 10 yrs ago. Seems expats like the idea of cycling more than actually cycling in Singapore.

*except the condo I visit on Sentosa.


sentosa cove security goons will cut the lock and stuff any bike that looks like it's ABOUT to rust into their patrol car and dump it at a mainland coffeeshop.

either that, or we have super idiotic rules relating to facades and common areas...

no, a bit of both!
Aut viam ad caelum inveniam aut faciam

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Postby beppi » Thu, 21 Aug 2014 12:36 am

I have even been stopped by the police, while cycling on Orchard Road (of all places!), who then told me that I should cycle on the pavement.
After some discussions, because I insisted that I not only have the right but also the duty to cycle on the road, they let me continue as I wished.
They probably wondered for weeks about the strange Ang Moh insisting to endanger himself (and, despite everything, I am still alive).

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Postby zzm9980 » Thu, 21 Aug 2014 12:44 am

curiousgeorge wrote: Besides, what the cost of shipping them Vs the price to buy here? Can get a cheap one at Giant for $120.


Do you buy your underwear and dress clothes at Giant too? What about **insert higher quality thing you like**? OP should bring them if they cost more than about $1000 each, which would make them slightly-below mid end bicycles.

And back to the OP, there are plenty of places to ride safely and enjoyably. Ride in the evening (after 6pm) or in the morning (before 8am). It's much better if you live near a big park or one of the many park connectors. Road riding is do-able if you've done it in any other major non-bike friendly city in the world. While people drive terribly in Singapore, they're also fairly predictable and it's not terribly hard to ride defensively.

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Postby x9200 » Thu, 21 Aug 2014 6:18 am

I know a number of people commuting (or used to) every day shorter or longer distances to/from work and the consensus is, it is not more dangerous than in the more traffic civilized countries. Some even say the drivers here pay more attention to the cyclists.

I don't (bi)cycle but I strongly suspect this is exactly like with the motorcycles and cars. The traffic does not really follow the regulations but it is not erratic. It's generally enough to be careful and learn the patterns to stay safe.

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Postby bgd » Thu, 21 Aug 2014 10:47 am

x9200 wrote:I know a number of people commuting (or used to) every day shorter or longer distances to/from work and the consensus is, it is not more dangerous than in the more traffic civilized countries. Some even say the drivers here pay more attention to the cyclists.

I don't (bi)cycle but I strongly suspect this is exactly like with the motorcycles and cars. The traffic does not really follow the regulations but it is not erratic. It's generally enough to be careful and learn the patterns to stay safe.


I have commuted by cycle here and will again once I move offices. It is my favourite form of transport. And as you say, with any experience of cycling in other busy cites then Sg is fine.

My other form of transport is motor bike. I can confirm your suspions, drivers' skill level is pretty low but they are predictable and not (usually) aggressive. Riding a motorbike here, for me at least, is fine.

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Postby maneo » Thu, 21 Aug 2014 12:17 pm

zzm9980 wrote:Road riding is do-able if you've done it in any other major non-bike friendly city in the world. While people drive terribly in Singapore, they're also fairly predictable and it's not terribly hard to ride defensively.

The only thing predictable about the drivers here is that they are unpredictable. They will turn left into the driveway you are about to cross and without any hesitation. They will pull out into the intersection you are crossing as if you are not there. Lorry drivers and bus drivers think you should be on the sidewalk, so they won't give you any room as they pass.

So, yes, riding defensively on the roads is mandatory.
Best to ride in early morning or at night.
Or just ride fast, faster than the traffic to stay ahead of what's coming from behind.
Better to take advantage of the parks and connectors and stay away from the roads.

If you consider your bike to be special in some way, then sure, bring it.
Otherwise, there are quite a few bike shops here that can cater to your needs.

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Postby zzm9980 » Thu, 21 Aug 2014 1:44 pm

maneo wrote:
zzm9980 wrote:Road riding is do-able if you've done it in any other major non-bike friendly city in the world. While people drive terribly in Singapore, they're also fairly predictable and it's not terribly hard to ride defensively.

The only thing predictable about the drivers here is that they are unpredictable. They will turn left into the driveway you are about to cross and without any hesitation. They will pull out into the intersection you are crossing as if you are not there. Lorry drivers and bus drivers think you should be on the sidewalk, so they won't give you any room as they pass.



You just described predictable things they do (and to be wary of) to make my point :) It's Singapore, not Vietnam or India here. I guess the perspective really matters based on where one grew up and rode previously.

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Postby Dert42 » Fri, 22 Aug 2014 10:18 am

i ring my bell not necessarily to get people to move out of the way, but to warn them i am passing them so they don't jump around or yelp when i go by. i only cycle on the park connector or in the park though.

what really pisses me off is motorcycles taking shortcuts on the sidewalk. one of them almost hit a kid getting off the bus one day outside my condo. if i see it again, i'm going to grab his handle bar and yank.

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Postby x9200 » Fri, 22 Aug 2014 1:06 pm

Dert42 wrote:i ring my bell not necessarily to get people to move out of the way, but to warn them i am passing them so they don't jump around or yelp when i go by. i only cycle on the park connector or in the park though.

So in other words they have to modify their behavior because someone who does not suppose to be in this place as opposite to the pedestrians decided to go there. Still pretty arrogant.

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Postby JR8 » Fri, 22 Aug 2014 1:43 pm

Yep, that's the thing with a lot of commuter/cyclists these days, they think the sun shines out of their 'nobler than thou' derriere.

Meanwhile they break laws, and harass/bully pedestrians.

It's pretty simple, the right-of-way is derived from the relative ability to move or give way, plus the relative threat.

You have a pedestrian, who has right of way over ...
A horse, who has right of way over
A bicycle, who has a right of way over
A moped/motorbike ...
A car ...
A tractor...
A combined harvester or bloody great truck.

Lack of adherence to this natural and historic hierarchy is attempted p-taking.

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Postby bgd » Fri, 22 Aug 2014 2:12 pm

x9200 wrote:
Dert42 wrote:i ring my bell not necessarily to get people to move out of the way, but to warn them i am passing them so they don't jump around or yelp when i go by. i only cycle on the park connector or in the park though.

So in other words they have to modify their behavior because someone who does not suppose to be in this place as opposite to the pedestrians decided to go there. Still pretty arrogant.


He did say park connector which is shared use. Seems perfectly reasonable to let a pedestrian know that a cyclist is approaching.


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