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The JB canal at the end of the causeway.

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PNGMK
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The JB canal at the end of the causeway.

Postby PNGMK » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 10:36 am

Every time I drive to JB across the causeway I can see more and more evidence of the work going ahead to build a canal around the end of the causeway *. The bridge that goes up and over the old JB immigration point is high enough for shipping to pass under. Last month I noticed some buildings being demolished that are in the way of such a canal.

I've been wondering if MY will ever even announce this. They had such a push back over Mahathirs "U Shape" bridge that I doubt they will. This time they've been smart enough to build it in purely MY sovereign territory with nothing touching the causeway or in the waters of the strait so Singapore cannot use the separation agreement to argue against it.

From an environmental and mariners perspective I personally would to see the strait opened again.... I don't think Pasir Gudang is the threat to Singapore shipping and ports that some may think.

My crude drawing below is what I think will happen.

http://goo.gl/k51yk4

Image

* Purely my personal conjecture.

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Postby bgd » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 11:43 am

What is the point of the canal?

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Sergei82
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Postby Sergei82 » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 12:26 pm

I too wonder...

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PNGMK
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Postby PNGMK » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 12:59 pm

To ease access for ships coming down from the west side of the penisular to the Pasir Gudang port and terminals.... and for ships coming down the east side of the peninsular they can avoid Singapore altogether by sailing through the straits of Johor.

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Postby Sergei82 » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 1:21 pm

I understand that. What I don't understand in whether there is a huge benefit out of it.

As often with women: I understand what is she doing (saying), but I don't understand why she is doing that.

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Postby PNGMK » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 1:35 pm

Sergei82 wrote:I understand that. What I don't understand in whether there is a huge benefit out of it.

As often with women: I understand what is she doing (saying), but I don't understand why she is doing that.


Malaysia has long wanted a bigger slice of Singapore's shipping and port derived revenue. By offering a shorter path around the Malacca straits and South China sea they can attract port, bunkerage, chandler and other shipping type customers to their Pasir Gudang and related ports.

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Postby Sergei82 » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 1:46 pm

So the point is: long-term Singapore is losing its advantages in all fronts - economically, geographically, politically etc. Is that what you meant? Have Malaysians already started building the channel? I haven't heard about it yet.

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Postby PNGMK » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 2:01 pm

Sergei82 wrote:So the point is: long-term Singapore is losing its advantages in all fronts - economically, geographically, politically etc. Is that what you meant? Have Malaysians already started building the channel? I haven't heard about it yet.


1. Yes.

2. No they haven't started cutting the canal but there's a lot of preparation taking place if you look closely as you cross the border. My point is that this appears to be a stealth move by MY.

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Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 2:33 pm

Sergei82 wrote:As often with women: I understand what is she doing (saying), but I don't understand why she is doing that.


:D

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Postby zzm9980 » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 2:34 pm

PNGMK wrote:
Sergei82 wrote:I understand that. What I don't understand in whether there is a huge benefit out of it.

As often with women: I understand what is she doing (saying), but I don't understand why she is doing that.


Malaysia has long wanted a bigger slice of Singapore's shipping and port derived revenue. By offering a shorter path around the Malacca straits and South China sea they can attract port, bunkerage, chandler and other shipping type customers to their Pasir Gudang and related ports.


How much time/distance does it save? Is there a huge advantage to avoiding Singapore? The straights there aren't very wide, and the canal would be quite narrow. I imagine it would require a pilot captain to come onboard to guide the ship through. That is not cheap, and would surely negate any other advantages I could think of.

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Postby PNGMK » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 3:18 pm

zzm9980 wrote:
PNGMK wrote:
Sergei82 wrote:I understand that. What I don't understand in whether there is a huge benefit out of it.

As often with women: I understand what is she doing (saying), but I don't understand why she is doing that.


Malaysia has long wanted a bigger slice of Singapore's shipping and port derived revenue. By offering a shorter path around the Malacca straits and South China sea they can attract port, bunkerage, chandler and other shipping type customers to their Pasir Gudang and related ports.


How much time/distance does it save? Is there a huge advantage to avoiding Singapore? The straights there aren't very wide, and the canal would be quite narrow. I imagine it would require a pilot captain to come onboard to guide the ship through. That is not cheap, and would surely negate any other advantages I could think of.


I think it's partly political (i.e. a middle finger to LKY etc) as much as economic. As I mentioned this is purely conjecture on my part. I've not been able to find any published material on whether this happening.

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Postby beppi » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 4:16 pm

Due to sea currents and geographical factors, there is currently a difference of 1 - 1.5 m in water level between the sides of the causeway. Cutting a small canal through will thus cause strong currents that normal ships might not be able to handle. They would need a lock big enough for sea-going ships (similar to what the Panama canal has). I don't see a scope for that.
The original plan of cutting a huge portion of the causeway (half or so) does not cause that problem - no bottleneck, no strong currents.

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Postby Sergei82 » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 4:20 pm

beppi wrote:Due to sea currents and geographical factors, there is currently a difference of 1 - 1.5 m in water level between the sides of the causeway.

What will happen to Singapore if sea level around it rises by 1.5 m?

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Postby JR8 » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 4:21 pm

It'd be one heck of an engineering project. Building/excavating a 'Johore shipping channel' underneath The Causeway. Let's hope the risk assessments are thorough eh!

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Postby x9200 » Wed, 05 Feb 2014 4:31 pm

A bit more insight:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johor-Singapore_Causeway
(Attempts to have the Causeway replaced)


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