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Status of Children of PR Parents

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kn1ghtx
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Status of Children of PR Parents

Postby kn1ghtx » Mon, 15 Jun 2009 11:16 am

Hi,

My pregnant wife and I are both SG PR. so, I'm sure our baby boy can be SG PR as well. However, he'll have to serve the army later on. and is there any benefit of having PR status on the baby??

so another way, can my baby NOT be an SG PR?? if so, what would his status be then??

anyone here ever got in the same shoes??

Thanks

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Vaucluse
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Postby Vaucluse » Mon, 15 Jun 2009 1:05 pm

Well, you have 18 years or so to decide . . . and I guess one of gthe considerations you need to ponder is what you want out of Singapore . . . are you just there for the advantages, leeching from the country, or do you really want to be a part of society?
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Re: Status of Children of PR Parents

Postby nushk » Mon, 15 Jun 2009 1:17 pm

kn1ghtx wrote:Hi,

My pregnant wife and I are both SG PR. so, I'm sure our baby boy can be SG PR as well. However, he'll have to serve the army later on. and is there any benefit of having PR status on the baby??

so another way, can my baby NOT be an SG PR?? if so, what would his status be then??

anyone here ever got in the same shoes??

Thanks


I think one of the few benefits of PR status is that, you would have higher priority in school choices for your kid than non-citizens or non-PRs. of course if you are going to put your kid in International Schools (which cost a lot!!), then it isn't a concern.

yes your baby can NOT be a PR. I think his status would be as a depedent of his parents.

do a search. many threads do discuss this.. one of them:
http://www.singaporeexpats.com/forum/ftopic60242.html

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Postby kn1ghtx » Mon, 15 Jun 2009 1:32 pm

Vaucluse wrote:Well, you have 18 years or so to decide . . . and I guess one of gthe considerations you need to ponder is what you want out of Singapore . . . are you just there for the advantages, leeching from the country, or do you really want to be a part of society?


well, say we leave SG and our 18-yr-old baby abandons the SG PR. but IF in the future, he'll get some great opportunity to be expat in SG, I'm afraid SG government will 'black-list' him, and thus not give him any employment pass... :(

I dont want this to happen either...
so I'd rather have the baby as a dependant, not a PR...

but I'm just not too sure what's the pros & cons between PR & dependant...
I think nowadays, SG government doesn't have many benefits for PRs... all the benefits go to SG Citizens... since none of us want to be SG citizen anyway, we're weighing our baby status (PR vs. dependant)...

PR pros:
- priority to public school??
- anything else?

PR cons:
- Army
- anything else?

Dependant Pass pros:
- NO Army
- anything else?

Dependant Pass cons:
- more expensive for school maybe??
- anything else??

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Postby Vaucluse » Mon, 15 Jun 2009 2:08 pm

Fair enough, thanks for the answer.

Our littlest one is a PR, but she is a girl, the otehrs are not PRs, it just seemed like the thing to do at the time.

I'd say the major negative impact would be in schooling.
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Postby kn1ghtx » Mon, 15 Jun 2009 2:12 pm

Vaucluse wrote:Fair enough, thanks for the answer.

Our littlest one is a PR, but she is a girl, the otehrs are not PRs, it just seemed like the thing to do at the time.

I'd say the major negative impact would be in schooling.


so your son(s) are under dependant pass??
if you dont mind, how old are they? are they in pre-school? or primary school?

I heard primary school here is quite cheap (be it for PRs [$10/mo] or foreigners [$100/mo?] - ie. dependant pass holders). but how about pre-school? is it big difference between PRs and foreigners??

thanks a bunch...

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Postby kn1ghtx » Mon, 15 Jun 2009 2:57 pm

actually, from MoM website about dependant's pass:

Employment Pass holders (P1, P2 and Q1) and S Pass holders (whose fixed monthly salary is more than $2,500) may apply for Dependant's Passes (DPs) for their:
* Spouse; or
* Unmarried/legally adopted children under 21 years of age, including new borns*.


However, both my wife and I are SG PRs. so, can we apply dependant's pass for our baby then??

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 15 Jun 2009 3:13 pm

No. You can give them PR or..... You can apply for a LTSVP (Long term social visit pass) which will have to be periodically renewed (3, 6, 9, 12 month intervals - I think it depends). Once the child becomes school aged you can apply for a Student Visa for the child which will last considerably longer. However, be prepared to pay considerably more for schooling this way.

There aren't any cons frankly to having PR. The only one some people ever think of is NS and that is definitely a PRO as the networks a person will build while there will last a lifetime and with Singapore being a global hub, those links will stretch around the world. Something to really give serious thought to.

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Postby kn1ghtx » Mon, 15 Jun 2009 3:26 pm

sundaymorningstaple wrote:Once the child becomes school aged you can apply for a Student Visa for the child which will last considerably longer. However, be prepared to pay considerably more for schooling this way.


how old is school aged? like pre-school? or primary school?
and, how much more for schooling?? maybe you can share the amount in SGD (PR vs. Student Visa)...

if it's $10 vs $100, I can live with $100/month..
but if it's $100 vs $1000, then I'd need to consider this a lot more... :(

If NS for PR is only 2-3 yrs, maybe it's fine... but the annoying part is the re-service... I know for SG male citizens, every 2 yrs, they have to re-service the army (or something like that) until 40 yrs old??

so if he (the baby) in adulthood no longer lives in Singapore, but still have the SG PR status, does he have to go back for re-service??

or if he let go the PR status (for being away from SG for a while) after serving NS (and hopefully no re-service cuz he doesnt hold SG PR anymore), can he go back to SG in the future (should any opportunity arise)?

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Postby sundaymorningstaple » Mon, 15 Jun 2009 3:58 pm

kn1ghtx wrote:
sundaymorningstaple wrote:Once the child becomes school aged you can apply for a Student Visa for the child which will last considerably longer. However, be prepared to pay considerably more for schooling this way.


how old is school aged? like pre-school? or primary school?
and, how much more for schooling?? maybe you can share the amount in SGD (PR vs. Student Visa)...

if it's $10 vs $100, I can live with $100/month..
but if it's $100 vs $1000, then I'd need to consider this a lot more... :(

See the article at bottom.......

If NS for PR is only 2-3 yrs, maybe it's fine... but the annoying part is the re-service... I know for SG male citizens, every 2 yrs, they have to re-service the army (or something like that) until 40 yrs old??

Active Duty for NS is currently around 21 months (unless boy is a fatty) then it will be a couple months more while they knock the fat off'n him.
If the boy gives up his PR subsequently it's of no concern and will be no penalties in the future and no it would not have to return to do the annual training. However if he does stay here, he would just be building up stronger networks in the future.


so if he (the baby) in adulthood no longer lives in Singapore, but still have the SG PR status, does he have to go back for re-service?? If he no longer lives in Singapore he won't have PR as once his re-entry permit expires his PR will lapse.

or if he let go the PR status (for being away from SG for a while) after serving NS (and hopefully no re-service cuz he doesnt hold SG PR anymore), can he go back to SG in the future (should any opportunity arise)?

If he gives up his PR, and subsequently returns in the future if an opportunity arises, most likely, if he's under 40 he will have to fulfill his obligation and rightly so as it would appear that he gave up his PR in order to avoid doing any further duty. I don't have any confirmation of that but it would stand to reason don't you think?


The following from an article in Dec 2006:

From next year, permanent residents (PRs) in government-aided schools, junior colleges and centralised institutes will have to pay about 20% more for school fees.

They currently pay the same fees as citizens at the secondary and pre-university levels.

Foreign students, whose fees are already higher than those for citizens and PRs, will have their fees increased by about 30%.

But the new fees for foreign students will take effect in 2009 so as to give them time to decide if they wish to apply to become permanent residents.

For the independent schools, they will continue to decide on their own fees but will ensure that fees for PRs are 20% or more above those for citizens; fees for foreign students will be 50% or more above those for citizens, and not lower than fees for PRs.

The revisions follow an announcement by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong earlier this month that the government is introducing a clearer differentiation of fees paid for education by Singapore citizens, permanent residents and foreigners.

The new fees for PRs and foreign students will however remain competitive compared with International Schools and comparable universities overseas, says the Ministry of Education.

The government will ensure that Singapore's fee structures allow the Republic to continue to attract quality students, add diversity in the educational environment and keep our institutions' international standing high.

With the revisions, a Singaporean in a government- or government-aided secondary school will continue to pay $60 a year in school fee but a PR will pay $72.

A foreign student from an ASEAN country will pay $1,860 while foreigners from other countries will pay $2,040, both up from the current $1,560.

For the polytechnics, currently, PRs pay the same tuition fees as citizens while foreign students pay fees that are 10% more than citizens.

From the academic year 2008, PRs who are admitted to polytechnics will pay fees that are 10% more than citizens. For foreign students, their fees will be 50% higher than those for citizens.

Existing PRs and foreign students in polytechnics will not experience these adjustments in fees.

For the Institutes of Education (ITE), currently PRs pay the same tuition fees as citizens.

From the 2008 academic year, PRs will pay fees that are 10% more than citizens.

But ITE fees for foreign students will be 80% higher than the current rates.

As foreign students' fees in ITE are currently significantly lower than those in schools and JCs, the increase will bring them closer, says the MOE.

For the universities, currently PRs in the autonomous universities pay the same tuition fees as citizens while foreign students pay fees that are 10% more than citizens.

From the academic year 2008, PRs will have to pay fees that are 10% more than citizens.

For foreign students, fees will be 50% higher than those for citizens.

The fee adjustments will not apply to existing PRs and foreign students in universities.


sms

kn1ghtx
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Postby kn1ghtx » Mon, 15 Jun 2009 5:01 pm

wow... that article is very useful... thanks a bunch...
and to think that the tuition difference between PRs and Student Visas is more than $1k/month, is a lot!!


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