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fogging against Dengue mosquitoes

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ututu
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Re: fogging against Dengue mosquitoes

Post by ututu » Sun, 19 Oct 2008 8:22 am

[quote="cirkus"]Dear all,
I learned that here is a great deal of "fogging" at our and other condos here in Singapore. First we thought it is being done every once in a while, but now I found out they do it every week (at times when most people are at work). On a recent occasion, the fogging was very heavy, so that our fish in the aquarium on the balcony on the 6th floor keeled over!!!
What is this fogging stuff? I know it's against the mosquitoes, but the entire ground must be totally contaminated with that stuff. Is it safe to let children play outside on the lawns???
It seems to me that Dengue is a short term problem, but when people get sick in 20 years, no one will know it was the fogging...[/quote]

Quite a few insecticides are deadly to fish and amphibians with no to little effect on birds and mammals. So yes, insecticide is likely to take out your fish, frogs and other animals that have aquatic stage (and corresponding metabolism) in their lives.

Years ago Australia used to fog any incoming airplane with similar stuff, it can cause allergies and other unpleasant reactions in people with history of immune system disorders.

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Re: fogging against Dengue mosquitoes

Post by sierra2469alpha » Sun, 19 Oct 2008 7:51 pm

ututu wrote:Years ago Australia used to fog any incoming airplane with similar stuff, it can cause allergies and other unpleasant reactions in people with history of immune system disorders.
Incorrect. The chemicals used here in SIN are totally different than the sprays we used on equipment (aircraft). The spray used on inbound AUS a/c was not for mosquito - it was a general pesticide before the Customs peeps re-arranged the way you were allowed into AUS. It changed when the cross-border protection systems were put in place.

Inbound a/c to AUS were never "fogged". If you want to check it out, ask QF, CX, SQ.

Don't post crap, please. There are far too many people here who try to help people out, and postings like yours just make our lives more difficult.

Mr. P

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Post by micknlea » Sun, 19 Oct 2008 10:23 pm

It may not have been the same stuff (I'm sure we would all be dead by now if it was :P ) but that stuff they used to spray in the cabins was awful and affected people quite badly sometimes, didn't seem to do much good either, friend brought home a lovely african spider (not intentionally believe me!!! ) in her cabin luggage and it was quite alive and well despite the spraying of the cabin :shock: I did wonder then what the whole point of it was.
"My husband said it was him or the cat...I miss him sometimes." - Unknown

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Post by durain » Sun, 19 Oct 2008 10:28 pm

those spray on the airplane is usually for airbourne bugs and inserts.

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Post by micknlea » Sun, 19 Oct 2008 10:34 pm

...and humans *cough...choke...splutter* (insert sick smilie here)
"My husband said it was him or the cat...I miss him sometimes." - Unknown

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Post by road.not.taken » Mon, 20 Oct 2008 7:14 am

sierra2469alpha wrote:R.N.T - nah, Paris in Springtime is dog poopies! Almost as dangerous! Ms. C and I had our honeymoon there, and I almost "came a cropper" more than a few times!

Bless, P
Been a few times and I'd still take it over springtime here :)

That was such a hoot, flying into Australia the first time and getting sprayed. I think they have to do what they can, even if it isn't 100% effective.

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Re: fogging against Dengue mosquitoes

Post by ututu » Tue, 21 Oct 2008 3:59 pm

sierra2469alpha wrote:
ututu wrote:Years ago Australia used to fog any incoming airplane with similar stuff, it can cause allergies and other unpleasant reactions in people with history of immune system disorders.
Incorrect. The chemicals used here in SIN are totally different than the sprays we used on equipment (aircraft). The spray used on inbound AUS a/c was not for mosquito - it was a general pesticide before the Customs peeps re-arranged the way you were allowed into AUS. It changed when the cross-border protection systems were put in place.

Inbound a/c to AUS were never "fogged". If you want to check it out, ask QF, CX, SQ.

Don't post crap, please. There are far too many people here who try to help people out, and postings like yours just make our lives more difficult.

Mr. P
http://www.kefir.net/spray/sandiegouniontrib2.htm

Let me quote:

Most countries have since dropped the requirement, under pressure from the United States, after a spate of negative publicity in the early '90s. Australia and New Zealand, however, have remained adamant about the need for such spraying. That's caused some airlines, including United, British Airways and the Australian carrier Qantas, to switch to a "residual" application procedure allowed by those countries.

The method calls for permeating a plane's interior surfaces with a long-lasting insecticide at eight-week intervals while neither passengers nor crew members are on board. "Residual spraying" is done by workers in protective gear when planes are unoccupied.

In one case, a Los Angeles-based United Air Lines flight attendant (who spoke on condition of anonymity) first began to develop an unusual, burnlike irritation on her legs in 1996, the year after she began routinely working on flights to and from Sydney, Australia.

Do I need to highlight words "insecticide" "protective gear" "long-lasting" ?
I know, I know it would be something I shouldn't be expecting you to take your words back. F..king moron, don't post rude sh.t if you have sh.t for brains.

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Post by boffenl » Tue, 21 Oct 2008 4:16 pm

Sorry, but isn't the fogging actually for cockroaches? The posters announcing fogging days in our neighborhood always mention cockroaches, not mosquitos. Locals don't seem to really mind the fog--I've seen old guys still drinking beer being fogged. Ugh. Also, tape your trash shoots (spelling?) so the bugs--BIG FLYING COCKROACHES--can't get into your place. Personal experience! It's not pretty in the garbage shoots during and immediately after the fogging.

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Post by sierra2469alpha » Tue, 21 Oct 2008 4:20 pm

Let me be a little more correct. I was saying that the pesticide used in aircraft WHILE PAX WERE ONBOARD was not the same as the "fogging" pesticide used here. I can see how my comment that aircraft were never "fogged" could have been mis-interpreted. I was talking about the spray used while PAX were aboard.

In reading the comment I quoted you on, it implied you were talking about, inter alia, "...fogging any incoming airplane with similar stuff..."

Always happy to make things clearer, even if your original post was not exactly a stunning piece of prose, nor was it entirely clear if you were talking about spraying of insecticide while PAX were O/B or treatment of the equipment while in scheduled maintenance (i.e. no pax onboard), that which you then conveniently "flip" to suit the purpose of flaming me because I disagreed with you.

As an ex airline pilot, I kinda know these things.

Besides, on a plane, if it's not the pesticide they spray, it's the food. Damn near killed me a few times!!

We clear, now?

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Post by ututu » Tue, 21 Oct 2008 4:57 pm

sierra2469alpha wrote:Let me be a little more correct. I was saying that the pesticide used in aircraft WHILE PAX WERE ONBOARD was not the same as the "fogging" pesticide used here. I can see how my comment that aircraft were never "fogged" could have been mis-interpreted. I was talking about the spray used while PAX were aboard.

In reading the comment I quoted you on, it implied you were talking about, inter alia, "...fogging any incoming airplane with similar stuff..."

Always happy to make things clearer, even if your original post was not exactly a stunning piece of prose, nor was it entirely clear if you were talking about spraying of insecticide while PAX were O/B or treatment of the equipment while in scheduled maintenance (i.e. no pax onboard), that which you then conveniently "flip" to suit the purpose of flaming me because I disagreed with you.

As an ex airline pilot, I kinda know these things.

Besides, on a plane, if it's not the pesticide they spray, it's the food. Damn near killed me a few times!!

We clear, now?
If you haven't used words like "post such crap" in your post believe I would have remained civil. But if someone uses language like that I'll return the favor. Anyway,
we are good. I'm sorry for outburst.

Here is a thing that is used to fog in SG
http://www.epa.gov/oppsrrd1/REDs/factsh ... red_fs.htm
I figured this based on summary of research paper from Vector Control & Research Department, Ministry of the Environment, Singapore.
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/b ... rmat=print

Here is a thing that is used on planes.
http://www.intox.org/databank/documents ... henoth.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permethrin

This is the same thing that you can buy in convenience store to kill off ants or cockroaches (less effective).

Google away on toxicity and cancerogenic effects of both.

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Post by sierra2469alpha » Tue, 21 Oct 2008 5:05 pm

Ututu - glad we're cool - as I said your original post was a little unclear so fault on both sides. Glad we could fix it up.

I'll log into my Boeing tech crew account - I seem to recall that permethrin was subject to an AD (Airworthiness Directive) quite a few years back - something to do with corrosion. If I find it I'll post a link.

In the mean time, be a helper and find out how all of us can avoid the problems associated with bloody airline food!!!!! :P We could save millions!!!

take care, Mr. P

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Post by QRM » Tue, 21 Oct 2008 5:10 pm

boffenl wrote: Also, tape your trash shoots (spelling?) so the bugs--BIG FLYING COCKROACHES--can't get into your place. Personal experience! It's not pretty in the garbage shoots during and immediately after the fogging.
If you tape it, then its a long trip down to the garbage collection point. We spray Baygon around the stainless steel chute bucket every evening.

I suspect roaches would use drains, gaps under the door, and lift shafts as a more suitable means of access to flats.

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Post by boffenl » Tue, 21 Oct 2008 5:39 pm

I pull the tape off the next morning--usually they're gone by then. If not, one of their antennae are stuck on the tape and I beat the hell out of it with my broom. But spraying works well too. :)

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Post by sundaymorningstaple » Tue, 21 Oct 2008 6:10 pm

As cockroaches are 99% pure protein, I just eat'em! :P

Just to keep it real. Fogging is done both for mosquitoes and cockroaches. The fogging of garbage chutes is for cockroaches and the noisy guys with the space invaders guns walking around estates shooting into the drains and gardens are fogging for mosquitoes.

And yes, fogging is/can be toxic after a while. That's why our workers are required by NEA to have 6 monthly bloodtests and cannot get their licenses renewed if the don't have the required number of tests over the three years before the license needs to be renewed.

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Post by sierra2469alpha » Tue, 21 Oct 2008 6:12 pm

Ahh so that's why airline meals are so high in protein.....

Sorry, couldn't resist... :lol:

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